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Establishment of a bone-anchored auricular prosthesis (BAAP) program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187722
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Dec 2;66(3):273-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2002
Author
Brian W Rotenberg
Adrian L James
David Fisher
Jim Anderson
Blake C Papsin
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Dec 2;66(3):273-9
Date
Dec-2-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bone and Bones
Child
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - diagnosis - surgery
Ear, External - abnormalities - surgery
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Ontario
Osseointegration - physiology
Patient Selection
Prognosis
Prostheses and Implants
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bone-anchored auricular prostheses (BAAPs) are indicated for treatment of congenital or acquired microtia in children. This paper reports on our experience in establishing a BAAP program, including treatment algorithms, protocols and a discussion of the methodology, complications and patient satisfaction.
Eleven consecutive children using BAAPs were reviewed. Outcome measures include patient selection criteria, long-term stability of the BAAP, skin reactions around the site, and patient satisfaction.
A patient selection program was developed and implemented, followed by a management protocol for surgery and follow-up. All children (100%) achieved osseointegration, with only one site revision necessary. A variable degree of skin irritation was noted in just over one third (39%) of cases. All children were satisfied with their prosthesis.
The use of BAAPs in a pediatric population is a safe and viable method to correct disfiguring microtia. The final result is generally very acceptable to the child.
PubMed ID
12443817 View in PubMed
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Impact of cleft palate type on the incidence of acquired cholesteatoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116390
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2013 May;77(5):695-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Luke Harris
Sharon L Cushing
Bradley Hubbard
David Fisher
Blake C Papsin
Adrian L James
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2013 May;77(5):695-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesteatoma, Middle Ear - epidemiology - etiology
Cleft Palate - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of acquired cholesteatoma in children with congenital cleft palate, and to determine the impact of various cleft palate types (cleft lip and palate, cleft palate alone, submucous cleft palate) on the development of acquired cholesteatoma.
This is a retrospective cohort study spanning a 25-year period from 1981 to 2005. The Cleft Palate Registry at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada was cross-referenced with the hospital's surgical pathology database to identify all children with cleft palate and acquired cholesteatoma. Accuracy and completeness of the datasets were confirmed by comparison with hospital records and other databases.
There were 2737 children who underwent palatoplasty over the study period, and 44 of these children developed an acquired cholesteatoma. Adjusting for censored data by Kaplan Meier analysis, the incidence of cholesteatoma was 2.2% between the ages 5 and 18 years, or 0.2% per year. Acquired cholesteatoma was 3 times more common in cleft lip and palate than cleft palate alone (p=0.002, Kaplan Meier Log-rank survival analysis).
The rate of acquired cholesteatoma in children with cleft palate is approximately 200 times the baseline rate. Children, especially teenagers, with cleft lip and palate appear to be at significantly higher risk for acquired cholesteatoma than children with cleft palate alone.
PubMed ID
23402698 View in PubMed
Less detail