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Exposing the "myth" of ABC, "anything but chrysotile": a critique of the Canadian asbestos mining industry and McGill University chrysotile studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183190
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Nov;44(5):540-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
David Egilman
Corey Fehnel
Susanna Rankin Bohme
Author Affiliation
Clinical Associate Professor, Brown University, Department of Community Health, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Nov;44(5):540-57
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Canada
Epidemiologic Research Design
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects
Mining
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Public Health
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced
Scientific Misconduct
Abstract
Beginning in the 1930s, the Canadian asbestos industry created and advanced the idea that chrysotile asbestos is safer than asbestos of other fiber types.
We critically evaluate published and unpublished studies funded by the Quebec Asbestos Mining Association (QAMA) and performed by researchers at McGill University.
QAMA-funded researchers put forth several myths purporting that Quebec-mined chrysotile was harmless, and contended that the contamination of chrysotile with oils, tremolite, or crocidolite was the source of occupational health risk. In addition, QAMA-funded researchers manipulated data and used unsound sampling and analysis techniques to back up their contention that chrysotile was "essentially innocuous."
These studies were used to promote the marketing and sales of asbestos, and have had a substantial effect on policy and occupational health litigation. Asbestos manufacturing companies and the Canadian government continue to use them to promote the use of asbestos in Europe and in developing countries. Am. J. Ind. Med. 44:540-557, 2003.
PubMed ID
14571518 View in PubMed
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