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A case of occupational peritoneal mesothelioma from exposure to tremolite-free chrysotile in Quebec, Canada: A black swan case.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141454
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Feb;54(2):153-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
David Egilman
Lelia M Menéndez
Author Affiliation
Brown University, Department of Family Medicine Health, Providence, RI, USA. degilman@egilman.com
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Feb;54(2):153-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos, Amphibole - toxicity
Asbestos, Serpentine - toxicity
Fatal Outcome
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
Tremolite contamination has been proposed as the cause of mesothelioma in workers exposed to commercial chrysotile. The asbestos industry and scientists it has sponsored, for example, have argued that commercial chrysotile does not cause peritoneal mesothelioma.
Case report of peritoneal mesothelioma in a mill worker from a tremolite free Canadian mine.
Reports from pathology and occupational health and safety panels conclude that this mill worker developed work-related peritoneal mesothelioma.
Chrysotile without tremolite can cause peritoneal mesothelioma.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Ind Med. 2011 Aug;54(8):64621630296
PubMed ID
20721899 View in PubMed
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Exposing the "myth" of ABC, "anything but chrysotile": a critique of the Canadian asbestos mining industry and McGill University chrysotile studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183190
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Nov;44(5):540-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
David Egilman
Corey Fehnel
Susanna Rankin Bohme
Author Affiliation
Clinical Associate Professor, Brown University, Department of Community Health, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Nov;44(5):540-57
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Canada
Epidemiologic Research Design
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects
Mining
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Public Health
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced
Scientific Misconduct
Abstract
Beginning in the 1930s, the Canadian asbestos industry created and advanced the idea that chrysotile asbestos is safer than asbestos of other fiber types.
We critically evaluate published and unpublished studies funded by the Quebec Asbestos Mining Association (QAMA) and performed by researchers at McGill University.
QAMA-funded researchers put forth several myths purporting that Quebec-mined chrysotile was harmless, and contended that the contamination of chrysotile with oils, tremolite, or crocidolite was the source of occupational health risk. In addition, QAMA-funded researchers manipulated data and used unsound sampling and analysis techniques to back up their contention that chrysotile was "essentially innocuous."
These studies were used to promote the marketing and sales of asbestos, and have had a substantial effect on policy and occupational health litigation. Asbestos manufacturing companies and the Canadian government continue to use them to promote the use of asbestos in Europe and in developing countries. Am. J. Ind. Med. 44:540-557, 2003.
PubMed ID
14571518 View in PubMed
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Scientists appeal to Quebec Premier Charest to stop exporting asbestos to the developing world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143585
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;16(2):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tim K Takaro
Devra Davis
Sue Janse Van Rensburg
Ruth Sara Arroyo Aguilar
Eduardo Algranti
John C Bailar
Fiorella Belpoggi
Mathis Berlin
Shelley Bhattacharya
Y V Bonnier Viger
James Brophy
Ray Bustinza
Robert B Cameron
John M Dement
David Egilman
Barry Castleman
Sanjay Chaturvedi
Martin Cherniack
Harlal Choudhury
Paul A Demers
Joseph Digangi
Ana Digon
John G Edwards
Anders Englund
Bjørn Erikson
Heleno Rodrigues Corréa Filho
Giuliano Franco
Arthur L Frank
Alice Freund
David Gee
Antonio Giordano
Michael Gochfeld
Marcel Gilberg
David F Goldsmith
Bernard D Goldstein
Philippe Grandjean
Morris Greenberg
Ivan Gut
Raul Harari
Marc Hindry
Christer Hogstedt
James Huff
Peter F Infante
Bengt Järvholm
David G Kern
Matthew Keifer
Kapil Khatter
Helge Kjuus
Margaret Keith
Linda C Koo
Arun Kumar
Joseph LaDou
Philip J Landrigan
Richard A Lemen
John M Last
Christopher W Lee
James Leigh
Stephen M Levin
Abby Lippman
Guadalupe Aguilar Madrid
Jock McCulloch
Melissa A McDiarmid
James A Merchant
Celeste Monforton
Tim Morse
David C F Muir
Debdas Mukerjee
Karen B Mulloy
J. Myers
Iman Nuwayhid
Peter Orris
David Ozonoff
Domyung Paek
Manomita Patra
Daniela Pelclová
Lew Pepper
Gerald V Poje
Qamar Rahman
Bernardo Reyes
Bruce W S Robinson
Eduardo Rodríguez
Cecile Rose
Kenneth D Rosenman
Linda Rosenstock
Mathuros Ruchirawat
Konrad Rydzynski
Joachim Schneider
Barbara Silverstein
C Eduardo Siqueira
Craig Slatin
Morando Soffritti
Colin Soskoline
Judy Sparer
Leslie Thomas Stayner
Stanislaw Tarkowski
Daniel Thau Teitelbaum
Anna Tompa
Ivancica Trosic
Fernand Turcotte
Rodolfo A G Vilela
Yvonne R K Waterman
Andrew Watterson
David H Wegman
Laura S Welch
Hans-Joachim Woitowitz
Zulmiar Yanri
Cecillia Zavariz
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;16(2):241-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - economics
Asbestosis - prevention & control
Developing Countries
Humans
Mining - economics
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Quebec
Science
PubMed ID
20465068 View in PubMed
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