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Association of functional variants in the dopamine D2-like receptors with risk for gambling behaviour in healthy Caucasian subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143707
Source
Biol Psychol. 2010 Sep;85(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Daniela S S Lobo
Renan P Souza
Ryan P Tong
David M Casey
David C Hodgins
Garry J Smith
Rob J Williams
Don P Schopflocher
Rob T Wood
Nady el-Guebaly
James L Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Neurogenetics Section, Neuroscience Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. daniela_lobo@camh.net
Source
Biol Psychol. 2010 Sep;85(1):33-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gambling - psychology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Impulse Control Disorders - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Abstract
Pathological gambling (PG) is an impulse control disorder with suggestive genetic vulnerability component. We evaluated the association of genetic variants in the dopaminergic receptor genes (DRD1-3s) with risk for gambling in healthy subjects using the Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI). Healthy Caucasian subjects who had gambled at least once in their lifetime (n=242) were included in the analysis. Gender was not associated with the CPGI, while younger age was associated with higher CPGI scores. We have found that none of the single polymorphisms investigated on DRD1 and DRD3 were associated with CPGI scores in healthy subjects. However, we observed trends for association on the TaqIA/rs1800497 polymorphism (P=0.10) and the haplotype flanking DRD2 (G/C/A rs11604671/rs4938015/rs2303380; P=0.06). Both trends were associated with lower CPGI score. Our results provide further evidence for the role of dopamine D2-like receptor in addiction susceptibility.
PubMed ID
20452395 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about gambling problems and recovery: results from a general population telephone survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138156
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Dec;27(4):625-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
John A Cunningham
Joanne Cordingley
David C Hodgins
Tony Toneatto
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 2S1, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Dec;27(4):625-31
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gambling - psychology - therapy
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Socioeconomic Factors
Telephone
Young Adult
Abstract
Respondents were asked their beliefs about gambling abuse as part of a general population telephone survey. The random digit dialing survey consisted of 8,467 interviews of adults, 18?years and older, from Ontario, Canada (45% male; mean age?=?46.2). The predominant conception of gambling abuse was that of an addiction, similar to drug addiction. More than half of respondents reported that treatment was necessary and almost three-quarters of respondents felt that problem gamblers would have to give up gambling completely in order to overcome their gambling problem. Problem gamblers (past or current) were less likely than non- or social gamblers to believe that treatment was needed, and current problem gamblers were least likely to believe that abstinence was required, as compared to all other respondents. Strong agreement with conceptions of gambling abuse as disease or addiction were positively associated with belief that treatment is needed, while strong agreement with conceptions of disease or wrongdoing were positively associated with belief that abstinence is required.
PubMed ID
21203805 View in PubMed
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Brief motivational treatment for problem gambling: a 24-month follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177955
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2004 Sep;18(3):293-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
David C Hodgins
Shawn Currie
Nady el-Guebaly
Nicole Peden
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. dhodgins@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2004 Sep;18(3):293-6
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Regression Analysis
Telephone
Abstract
A 24-month follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of 2 brief treatments for problem gambling (N = 67) revealed an advantage for participants who received a motivational telephone intervention plus a self-help workbook compared with participants who received only the workbook. Although the 2 groups did not differ in the number of participants reporting 6 months of abstinence, the motivational intervention group gambled fewer days, lost less money, and had lower South Oaks Gambling Screen scores. They were more likely to be categorized as improved compared with the self-help workbook only group. Overall, the results support the effectiveness of a brief telephone- and mail-based treatment for problem gamblers.
PubMed ID
15482086 View in PubMed
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Designing a longitudinal cohort study of gambling in Alberta: rationale, methods, and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155716
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Dec;24(4):479-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Nady El-Guebaly
David M Casey
David C Hodgins
Garry J Smith
Robert J Williams
Don P Schopflocher
Robert T Wood
Author Affiliation
Addiction Division, Foothills Addictions Program, University of Calgary, 1403 29th Street NW, Calgary, AB, Canada, T2N T29. nady.el-Guebaly@calgaryhealthregion.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Dec;24(4):479-504
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Behavior, Addictive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Gambling - psychology
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis
Abstract
Longitudinal research on the determinants of gambling behavior is sparse. This article briefly reviews the previous seventeen longitudinally designed studies, focusing on the methodology for each study. This is followed by a description of our ongoing longitudinal study entitled the Leisure, Lifestyle, and Lifecycle Project (LLLP). Participants for the LLLP were recruited from four locations in Alberta, Canada, including both rural and urban populations. In the LLLP most participants were recruited using random digit dialing (RDD), with 1808 participants from 5 age cohorts at baseline: 13-15, 18-20, 23-25, 43-45, and 63-65. Individuals completed telephone, computer, and face-to-face surveys at baseline, with the data collection occurring between February and October, 2006. At baseline, a wide variety of constructs were measured, including gambling behavior, substance use, psychopathology, intelligence, family environment, and internalizing and externalizing problems. Finally, the conclusions that can be drawn thus far are discussed as well as the plans for three future data collections.
PubMed ID
18696218 View in PubMed
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Examining the predictive validity of low-risk gambling limits with longitudinal data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132043
Source
Addiction. 2012 Feb;107(2):400-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Shawn R Currie
David C Hodgins
David M Casey
Nady el-Guebaly
Garry J Smith
Robert J Williams
Don P Schopflocher
Robert T Wood
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Canada. scurrie@ucalgary.ca
Source
Addiction. 2012 Feb;107(2):400-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Gambling - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the impact of gambling above the low-risk gambling limits developed by Currie et al. (2006) on future harm. To identify demographic, behavioural, clinical and environmental factors that predict the shift from low- to high-risk gambling habits over time.
Longitudinal cohort study of gambling habits in community-dwelling adults.
Alberta, Canada.
A total of 809 adult gamblers who completed the time 1 and time 2 assessments separated by a 14-month interval.
Low-risk gambling limits were defined as gambling no more than three times per month, spending no more than CAN$1000 per year on gambling and spending less than 1% of gross income on gambling. Gambling habits, harm from gambling and gambler characteristics were assessed by the Canadian Problem Gambling Index. Ancillary measures of substance abuse, gambling environment, major depression, impulsivity and personality traits assessed the influence of other risk factors on the escalation of gambling intensity.
Gamblers classified as low risk at time 1 and shifted into high-risk gambling by time 2 were two to three times more likely to experience harm compared to gamblers who remained low risk at both assessments. Factors associated with the shift from low- to high-risk gambling behaviour from time 1 to time 2 included male gender, tobacco use, older age, having less education, having friends who gamble and playing electronic gaming machines.
An increase in the intensity of gambling behaviour is associated with greater likelihood of future gambling related harm in adults.
PubMed ID
21851443 View in PubMed
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Source
Lancet. 2011 Nov 26;378(9806):1874-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-2011
Author
David C Hodgins
Jonathan N Stea
Jon E Grant
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. dhodgins@ucalgary.ca
Source
Lancet. 2011 Nov 26;378(9806):1874-84
Date
Nov-26-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cognitive Therapy
Family Therapy
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Impulse Control Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Psychotherapy - methods
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Gambling disorders, including pathological gambling and problem gambling, have received increased attention from clinicians and researchers over the past three decades since gambling opportunities have expanded around the world. This Seminar reviews prevalence, causes and associated features, screening and diagnosis, and treatment approaches. Gambling disorders affect 0·2-5·3% of adults worldwide, although measurement and prevalence varies according to the screening instruments and methods used, and availability and accessibility of gambling opportunities. Several distinct treatment approaches have been favourably evaluated, such as cognitive behavioural and brief treatment models and pharmacological interventions. Although promising, family therapy and support from Gamblers Anonymous are less well empirically supported. Gambling disorders are highly comorbid with other mental health and substance use disorders, and a further understanding is needed of both the causes and treatment implications of this disorder.
PubMed ID
21600645 View in PubMed
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Hesitation to seek gambling-related treatment among Ontario problem gamblers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130673
Source
J Addict Med. 2012 Mar;6(1):39-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Helen Suurvali
David C Hodgins
Tony Toneatto
John A Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Suite T527, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada. Helen_Suurvali@camh.net
Source
J Addict Med. 2012 Mar;6(1):39-49
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denial (Psychology)
Female
Gambling - psychology - rehabilitation
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Shame
Abstract
This study aimed to examine barriers in seeking help for gambling problems.
A random digit dialing telephone survey was conducted among adults in Ontario, Canada. Respondents meeting criteria for possible past year gambling problems were asked an open-ended question on why they might hesitate once they had decided to seek help.
Of 556 eligible respondents, 47% asserted they would not hesitate to seek help. The most frequently identified possible reasons for hesitation were shame, difficulty acknowledging the problem, and treatment-related issues. Younger gamblers and those with higher problem severity, self-perception of a gambling problem, and past treatment experience were more likely to volunteer shame and treatment-related issues. Gamblers with lower problem severity, no self-perception of a gambling problem, and no history of help seeking more frequently said they would not hesitate to seek help. However, among problem/pathological gamblers, 49% did not self-perceive even a moderate gambling problem; they were more likely than self-perceived problem gamblers in this high severity group to predict no hesitation.
In addition to revealing perceived and objective factors that impede help seeking for gambling problems, the identification of possible barriers may indicate, among some disordered gamblers, awareness of gambling problems and consideration given to possible actions. Both tackling barriers and enhancing problem awareness are necessary components of strategies to provide accessible and timely assistance to those with gambling problems.
PubMed ID
21979819 View in PubMed
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Internet-based interventions for disordered gamblers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of online self-directed cognitive-behavioural motivational therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117479
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
David C Hodgins
Gordon H Fick
Robert Murray
John A Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. dhodgins@ucalgary.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:10
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Internet
Motivation
Research Design
Self Care - methods
Self Efficacy
Single-Blind Method
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Gambling disorders affect about one percent of adults. Effective treatments are available but only a small proportion of affected individuals will choose to attend formal treatment. As a result, self-directed treatments have also been developed and found effective. Self-directed treatments provide individuals with information and support to initiate a recovery program without attending formal treatment. In previous research we developed an telephone-based intervention package that helps people to be motivated to tackle their gambling problem and to use basic behavioral and cognitive change strategies. The present study will investigate the efficacy of this self-directed intervention offered as a free online resource. The Internet is an excellent modality in which to offer self-directed treatment for gambling problems. The Internet is increasingly accessible to members of the public and is frequently used to access health-related information. Online gambling sites are also becoming more popular gambling platforms.
A randomized clinical trial (N=180) will be conducted in which individuals with gambling problems who are not interested in attending formal treatment are randomly assigned to have access to an online self-directed intervention or to a comparison condition. The comparison condition will be an alternative website that offers a self-assessment of gambling involvement and gambling-related problems. The participant's use of the resources and their gambling involvement (days of gambling, dollars loss) and their gambling problems will be tracked for a twelve month follow-up period.
The results of this research will be important for informing policy-makers who are developing treatment systems.
ISRCTN06220098.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23294668 View in PubMed
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Motivators for seeking gambling-related treatment among Ontario problem gamblers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131160
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2012 Jun;28(2):273-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Helen Suurvali
David C Hodgins
Tony Toneatto
John A Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Suite T527, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 2S1, Canada. Helen_Suurvali@camh.net
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2012 Jun;28(2):273-96
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Female
Gambling - psychology - rehabilitation
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Psychotherapy, Group
Self Concept
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A random digit dialing telephone survey was used to interview 8,467 adults in Ontario, Canada. The NODS-CLiP was used to identify a representative sample of 730 gamblers (54.3% male, mean age 45.3 years) with possible past year gambling problems in order to explore factors that might affect disordered gamblers' motivators for seeking gambling-related help. A final sample of 526 gamblers provided useable data on possible reasons for and barriers to seeking help, awareness of services, self-perception of gambling problems and experience with help-seeking. Financial and relationship issues were the most frequently volunteered motivators. However, over two-thirds of the respondents could not think of a reason for seeking help. Gamblers who had self-admitted or more severe problems, who knew how to get help, who were employed and had more education, and who identified possible barriers to seeking help were more likely to suggest motivators, especially financial ones. More research is recommended on gamblers' trajectory towards recognition of a gambling problem, the process of overcoming specific barriers to treatment, and the role of social advantage (e.g., education and employment), in order to devise educational campaigns that will encourage earlier help-seeking among disordered gamblers.
PubMed ID
21932112 View in PubMed
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A randomized controlled trial of a personalized feedback intervention for problem gamblers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126867
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31586
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
John A Cunningham
David C Hodgins
Tony Toneatto
Michelle Murphy
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31586
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gambling - therapy
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Self Care
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Personalized feedback is a promising self-help for problem gamblers. Such interventions have shown consistently positive results with other addictive behaviours, and our own pilot test of personalized normative feedback materials for gamblers yielded positive findings. The current randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness, and the sustained efficacy, of the personalized feedback intervention materials for problem gamblers.
Respondents recruited by a general population telephone screener of Ontario adults included gamblers with moderate and severe gambling problems. Those who agreed to participate were randomly assigned to receive: 1) the full personalized normative feedback intervention; 2) a partial feedback that contained all the feedback information provided to those in condition 1 but without the normative feedback content (i.e., no comparisons provided to general population gambling norms); or 3) a waiting list control condition. The primary hypothesis was that problem gamblers who received the personalized normative feedback intervention would reduce their gambling more than problem gamblers who did not receive any intervention (waiting list control condition) by the six-month follow-up.
The study found no evidence for the impact of normative personalized feedback. However, participants who received, the partial feedback (without norms) reduced the number of days they gambled compared to participants who did not receive the intervention. We concluded that personalized feedback interventions were well received and the materials may be helpful at reducing gambling. Realistically, it can be expected that the personalized feedback intervention may have a limited, short term impact on the severity of participants' problem gambling because the intervention is just a brief screener. An Internet-based version of the personalized feedback intervention tool, however, may offer an easy to access and non-threatening portal that can be used to motivate participants to seek further help online or in person.
ClinicalTrials.govNCT00578357.
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 2000 May;95(5):777-8910885052
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PubMed ID
22348112 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.