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Housing for persons with serious mental illness: consumer and service provider preferences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155432
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2008 Sep;59(9):1011-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Myra Piat
Alain Lesage
Richard Boyer
Henri Dorvil
Audrey Couture
Guy Grenier
David Bloom
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, and Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 6875 Boulevard LaSalle, Verdun, Québec, Canada. myra.piat@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2008 Sep;59(9):1011-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Case Management
Choice Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotic Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Public Housing
Quebec
Social Work
Abstract
This study evaluated the housing preferences of a representative sample of consumers with serious mental illness living in seven types of housing in Montreal, Quebec, and compared these with their case managers' housing preferences for them.
An inventory of all housing for this population was developed in consultation with administrators of three psychiatric hospitals and the regional health board. The inventory included seven categories: housing in a hospital setting, hostels, group homes, foster homes, supervised apartments, social housing (low-income housing or cooperative), and private rooming homes. A stratified random sample of 48 consumers was selected in each category. In all, 315 consumers and their case managers completed the Consumer Housing Preference Survey.
Most consumers preferred living in housing that offered them more autonomy than the housing in which they were currently living. Case managers preferred housing that offered some structure, such as supervised apartments. Forty-four percent of consumers preferred to live in their own apartment. More than a third of consumers preferred to live in their current housing.
When evaluating housing preferences, it is important to elicit the viewpoints of mental health consumers as well as their case managers. Special attention should be given to the type of housing where consumers currently live. A variety of housing, not just autonomous housing, is needed to meet the specific housing preferences of individuals with serious mental illness.
PubMed ID
18757594 View in PubMed
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[Housing preferences of people with severe mental illness: a descriptive study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151507
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2008;33(2):247-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Myra Piat
Alain Lesage
Henri Dorvil
Richard Boyer
Audrey Couture
David Bloom
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Hôpital Douglas, Départements de psychiatrie, Faculté de médecine, Université McGill.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2008;33(2):247-69
Date
2008
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Humans
Male
Mentally Ill Persons
Middle Aged
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
This article presents the results of an exploratory study on housing preferences of 315 people with serious mental illness living in seven types of housing in Montreal. The overall portrait that emerged from the study revealed that 22,0 % of the participants prefer to live in their own apartment, 16,0 % in HLM or OSBL, 14,1 % in a supervised apartment, and 11,5 % in a foster home. In addition, 31,7 % prefer the type of housing they were living in at the time of the study. The authors conclude that a variety of housing resources are necessary to meet the diverse needs of consumers.
PubMed ID
19370266 View in PubMed
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The importance of medication in consumer definitions of recovery from serious mental illness: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149774
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Aug;30(8):482-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Myra Piat
Judith Sabetti
David Bloom
Author Affiliation
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. myra.piat@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Aug;30(8):482-90
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Convalescence - psychology
Drug Monitoring
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - psychology - rehabilitation
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Social Support
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The role of medication in the recovery of mental health consumers is important. In the context of a multi-site Canadian study on the meaning of recovery, five themes related to medication and recovery emerged from qualitative interviews with 60 consumers. For these consumers, recovery meant: finding a medication that works; taking medication in combination with services and supports; complying with medication; having a say about medication; and living without medication. Findings underlined consumers' need to communicate their concerns around medication and be supported in developing self-management strategies and more collaborative relationships with providers. The study suggests an expanded role for nursing practice in these areas.
PubMed ID
19591021 View in PubMed
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The transformation of mental health services to a recovery-orientated system of care: Canadian decision maker perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145032
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2010 Mar;56(2):168-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Myra Piat
Judith Sabetti
David Bloom
Author Affiliation
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. myra.piat@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2010 Mar;56(2):168-77
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - organization & administration
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Decision Making, Organizational
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Organizational Innovation
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
Recovery is emerging as a worldwide paradigm in mental health. There is increasing recognition that the transformation of mental health systems to a recovery perspective requires collaboration among all stakeholders. Research to date has focused on the perspectives of service users and providers. The role and influence of organizational decision makers in the transformation process has been less studied.
This study reports findings from semi-structured interviews with decision makers on the implementation of recovery in Canada.
Decision makers view community-based services as most open to recovery-based approaches, and front-line providers as pivotal in implementing system change. Decision makers described their own role as limited to providing overall orientation and funding.
The shift to recovery must include active leadership from decision makers as a catalyst to change.
PubMed ID
20207679 View in PubMed
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