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Bereaved family members' assessments of the quality of end-of-life care: what is important?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126627
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(4):261-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Laura Funk
S Robin Cohen
Allison Williams
Darcee Bidgood
Diane Allan
Leah Norgrove
Daren Heyland
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada VBW 2Y2. kis@uvic.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(4):261-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bereavement
Canada
Consumer Satisfaction
Decision Making
Family
Female
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Terminal Care
Abstract
Families of patients are well poised to comment on the end-of-life (EOL) care received by those patients and can provide feedback to care providers and decision makers. To better understand family-member evaluations of the quality of in-patient EOL care, this study draws on qualitative interview data (n = 24) to identify core aspects of EOL care that are important for family members. Based on this analysis, a conceptual framework of family members' assessments of their experiences with EOL health care services is developed. Findings suggest the need to distinguish between perceived substantive or tangible features of received care, interpretations of the causes and symbolic meanings of that care, and personal and affective outcomes. Practitioners are encouraged to reflect on how behaviours and communications may be interpreted by families. Attention also needs to be given to the changes in practice and organizational decision making that can facilitate more positive experiences for families and patients.
PubMed ID
22372280 View in PubMed
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Developing palliative care competencies for the education of entry level baccalaureate prepared Canadian nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138262
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2011;8:Article 21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Brenda Jacono
Lynne Young
Cynthia Baker
Holly R L Richardson
Beryl Cable-Williams
Heather Jewers
Mireille Lavoie
Larry Librach
Darcee Bidgood
Mitzi Grace Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Cape Breton University.
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2011;8:Article 21
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Competency-Based Education
Consensus
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Needs Assessment
Palliative Care
Program Development - methods
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
Educational preparation of health professionals for Palliative and End of Life Care (PEOLC) is inadequate, and nurses are no exception. In 2004, the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing struck a Task Force to develop PEOLC competencies to address this issue. The development of national PEOLC nursing competencies involved a multi-step, emergent, interactive, and iterative process. An overarching principle guiding this process was building national consensus about the essential PEOLC specific competencies for nurses among experts in this field while simultaneously generating, revising, and refining them. There have been three stages in this iterative, multi-step process: 1) Generating a preliminary set of competencies, 2) Building a national consensus among educators and experts in the field on PEOLC specific competencies for nurses, and 3) Refining the consensus based competencies for curriculum development. Ongoing follow up work for this project is focusing on the integration of these competencies into nursing curricula.
PubMed ID
22718668 View in PubMed
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Effective partnerships. Bringing nursing research alive in the practice setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187360
Source
Can Nurse. 2002 Nov;98(10):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Darcee Bidgood
Caite Meagher
Veronica Morris
Audrey L Shaw
Carolyn Showler
Sheila J Short
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, British Columbia.
Source
Can Nurse. 2002 Nov;98(10):14-8
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community-Institutional Relations
Humans
Nursing Research
Substance-Related Disorders - nursing
PubMed ID
12484264 View in PubMed
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Use of palliative care services in a semirural program in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153137
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Diane E Allan
Shelly Waskiewich
Kelli I Stajduhar
Darcee Bidgood
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(1):10-5
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Female
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - utilization
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - utilization
Rural Population
Abstract
Although specialized palliative care services in rural areas are scarce, many people who are dying, and their families, want to remain in their homes or within their own community. As such, semirural communities across Canada have developed a variety of initiatives to address this need. The purpose of our paper is to describe a semirural palliative care program located in British Columbia.
We used univariate and bivariate analyses to examine all patients for whom a palliative care bed was requested in the Saanich Peninsula Hospital Palliative Care Unit (PCU) between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2006.
Data suggest that there is provision of care for local residents in this semirural community. Throughout 2005 and 2006, SPH received a total of 411 requests for a palliative care bed with about three-quarters of admissions coming from other units within the hospital and from local residents.
Use of services data collected from hospital charts can provide valuable information to help inform program and policy decision-makers. Yet such information is limited in relation to answering the question of whether the end-of-life needs of local residents are being met. Future studies should consider input from families and patients to enhance our understanding of the role of a PCU in a semirural environment.
PubMed ID
19146786 View in PubMed
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Using quality improvement to enhance research readiness in palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167676
Source
J Healthc Qual. 2006 Jul-Aug;28(4):22-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kelli I Stajduhar
Darcee Bidgood
Leah Norgrove
Diane Allan
Shelly Waskiewich
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Center on Aging, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. kis@uvic.ca
Source
J Healthc Qual. 2006 Jul-Aug;28(4):22-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Health facilities
Health Services Research
Humans
Palliative Care - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
Quality improvement is an essential feature of the ongoing development of palliative care programs. Little has been written, however, about using quality improvement as a strategy to introduce research concepts to staff and administrators for the purpose of enhancing research readiness in healthcare settings. This article describes such an endeavor. The authors discuss two quality improvement initiatives undertaken by a palliative care program in Canada. These two examples demonstrate how the quality improvement process acted as a catalyst to enhance research readiness.
PubMed ID
16944649 View in PubMed
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