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Consulting as a strategy for knowledge transfer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174287
Source
Milbank Q. 2005;83(2):299-321
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Nora Jacobson
Dale Butterill
Paula Goering
Author Affiliation
Health Systems Research and Consulting Unit, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell St., Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada. nora_jacobson@camh.net
Source
Milbank Q. 2005;83(2):299-321
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection - methods
Decision Making
Health Policy
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Knowledge
Ontario
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Academic researchers who work on health policy and health services are expected to transfer knowledge to decision makers. Decision makers often do not, however, regard academics' traditional ways of doing research and disseminating their findings as relevant or useful. This article argues that consulting can be a strategy for transferring knowledge between researchers and decision makers and is effective at promoting the "enlightenment" and "interactive" models of knowledge use. Based on three case studies, it develops a model of knowledge transfer-focused consulting that consists of six stages and four types of work. Finally, the article explores how knowledge is generated in consulting and identifies several classes of factors facilitating its use by decision makers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15960773 View in PubMed
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Linkage and exchange at the organizational level: a model of collaboration between research and policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183016
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2003 Oct;8 Suppl 2:14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Paula Goering
Dale Butterill
Nora Jacobson
Darryl Sturtevant
Author Affiliation
Health Systems Research and Consulting Unit, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2003 Oct;8 Suppl 2:14-9
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Health Policy
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Mental health services
Ontario
Abstract
This paper describes an organization-level initiative designed to promote linkage and exchange between a research unit and the mental health policy branch of Ontario's provincial government. Using a framework that conceptualizes four tiers--inter-organizational relationship, interactive research projects, dissemination and policy formation--in the application of linkage and exchange to the research and policy development processes, we present an example in order to explore the issues that arise in each tier. We conclude that while such initiatives enhance the relevance of research in the policy development process, they also present challenges that must be recognized and managed.
PubMed ID
14596743 View in PubMed
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Residential crisis units. Are we missing out on a good idea?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174556
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2004;23(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Laura McCabe
Dale Butterill
Paula Goering
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2004;23(1):65-74
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Crisis Intervention - economics - organization & administration
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Homeless Persons - psychology
Hospitalization - economics
Hotlines
Humans
Length of Stay
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Peer Group
Residential Facilities - economics - organization & administration
Self Care
Social Support
Abstract
Residential Crisis Units (RCU) are non-hospital-based facilities that provide mental health crisis intervention. This paper reviews the RCU literature base and finds good evidence of the ability of RCUs to function as alternatives to hospitalization for many consumers, with equivalent effectiveness and for significantly less cost. Despite this promising research, the RCU model has not been widely adopted. Using two crisis units as case examples as well as key informant interviews, this paper explores factors affecting the lack of dissemination and potential barriers to the growth of the RCU model.
PubMed ID
15920883 View in PubMed
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