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Association of Preeclampsia in Term Births With Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306377
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2020 08 01; 77(8):823-829
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2020
Author
Bob Z Sun
Dag Moster
Quaker E Harmon
Allen J Wilcox
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle.
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2020 08 01; 77(8):823-829
Date
08-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Autism Spectrum Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neurodevelopmental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Preeclampsia during pregnancy has been linked to an increased risk of cerebral palsy in offspring. Less is known about the role of preeclampsia in other neurodevelopmental disorders.
To determine the association between preeclampsia and a range of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in offspring after excluding preterm births.
This prospective, population-based cohort study included singleton children born at term from January 1, 1991, through December 31, 2009, and followed up through December 31, 2014 (to 5 years of age), using Norway's Medical Birth Registry and linked to other demographic, social, and health information by Statistics Norway. Data were analyzed from May 30, 2018, to November 17, 2019.
Maternal preeclampsia.
Associations between preeclampsia in term pregnancies and cerebral palsy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), epilepsy, intellectual disability, and vision or hearing loss using multivariable logistic regression.
The cohort consisted of 980?560 children born at term (48.8% female and 51.2% male; mean [SD] gestational age, 39.8 [1.4] weeks) with a mean (SD) follow-up of 14.0 (5.6) years. Among these children, 28?068 (2.9%) were exposed to preeclampsia. Exposed children were at increased risk of ADHD (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05-1.33), ASD (adjusted OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.08-1.54), epilepsy (adjusted OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.16-1.93), and intellectual disability (adjusted OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.13-1.97); there was also an apparent association between preeclampsia exposure and cerebral palsy (adjusted OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.94-1.80).
Preeclampsia is a well-established threat to the mother. Other than the hazards associated with preterm delivery, the risks to offspring from preeclampsia are usually regarded as less important. This study's findings suggest that preeclampsia at term may have lasting effects on neurodevelopment of the child.
PubMed ID
32236510 View in PubMed
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The association of preterm birth with severe asthma and atopic dermatitis: a national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105872
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2013 Dec;24(8):782-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Håvard Trønnes
Allen J Wilcox
Rolv Terje Lie
Trond Markestad
Dag Moster
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2013 Dec;24(8):782-7
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Asthma and atopic dermatitis are both regarded as atopic diseases. Being born too early is associated with increased risk of asthma, but some studies have indicated that the opposite might be true for atopic dermatitis. We explored in more detail the associations between preterm birth, asthma, and atopic dermatitis.
We analyzed data from Norwegian registries with prospectively collected data. All live births in Norway from 1967 through 2001 were followed through 2005 by linking the Medical Birth Registry of Norway to the National Insurance Scheme and to Statistics Norway. Only severe asthma and atopic dermatitis were registered in the National Insurance Scheme.
Of a total of 1,760,821 children, we identified 9,349 cases (0.5%) with severe asthma and 6,930 cases (0.4%) with severe atopic dermatitis. Compared with children born at term (37-41 wk gestation), preterm birth was associated with increased odds for severe asthma (odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-1.8) for 32-36 wk gestation and OR 3.6 (95% CI: 3.1-4.2) for 23-31 wk) and decreased odds for severe atopic dermatitis (OR 0.9 (95% CI: 0.8-1.0) for 32-36 wk gestation and OR 0.7 (95% CI: 0.5-1.0) for 23-31 wk). Adjustment for perinatal and socio-demographic factors weakened the association between gestational age and severe asthma, while slightly strengthening the association between gestational age and severe atopic dermatitis.
Preterm birth was associated with increased risk of severe asthma and decreased risk of severe atopic dermatitis.
PubMed ID
24298940 View in PubMed
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Associations of maternal atopic diseases with adverse pregnancy outcomes: a national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266507
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;28(6):489-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Håvard Trønnes
Allen J Wilcox
Trond Markestad
Mette Christophersen Tollånes
Rolv Terje Lie
Dag Moster
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;28(6):489-97
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Cohort Studies
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - immunology
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - epidemiology - immunology
Prevalence
Registries
Rhinitis, Allergic - epidemiology
Risk
Seasons
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal asthma has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Little is known about the influence of other atopic diseases on pregnancy outcomes. We assessed how various maternal atopic diseases might affect preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death.
By linking Norwegian national registries, we acquired information on maternal health, socio-demographic factors, pregnancy, birth, and neonatal outcome on all births in Norway from 1967 to 2003.
A total of 1?974?226 births were included. Of these, 1.8% had a record of maternal asthma, 3.4% of maternal atopic dermatitis, and 0.4% of maternal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Overall rates of preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death were 6.0%, 0.6%, and 0.5%, respectively. After adjustments for possible confounders, maternal asthma was associated with increased risk of preterm birth (relative risk (RR), 1.15, [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10, 1.21]). In contrast, maternal atopic dermatitis was associated with decreased risk of preterm birth (RR 0.90, [95% CI 0.86, 0.93]), stillbirth (RR 0.70, [95% CI 0.62, 0.79]), and neonatal death (RR 0.76, [95% CI 0.65, 0.90]). Similarly, maternal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was associated with decreased risk of preterm birth (RR 0.84, [95% CI 0.76, 0.94]) and stillbirth (RR 0.40, [95% CI 0.25, 0.66]).
We confirmed the previously reported association of maternal asthma with increased risk for preterm birth. Unexpectedly, maternal atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were associated with decreased risk of preterm birth and stillbirth. Mechanisms for these protective associations are unclear, and our findings require confirmation in further studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25359226 View in PubMed
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Cancer in childhood, adolescence, and young adults: a population-based study of changes in risk of cancer death during four decades in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123368
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1297-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Sara Ghaderi
Rolv Terje Lie
Dag Moster
Ellen Ruud
Astri Syse
Finn Wesenberg
Tone Bjørge
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, Bergen, Norway. Sara.Ghaderi@isf.uib.no
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1297-305
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Cancer is one of the most common causes of death among young individuals. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk of early death (the first five years after diagnosis) among children (0-14 years), adolescents (15-19 years), and young adults (20-24 years) with cancer in Norway, born during 1965-1985.
The overall and cancer-specific early deaths were explored by linking population-based national registers (including the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Cause of Death Registry) that include the entire population of Norway (approximately 1.3 million individuals). Hazard and sub-hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression analyses and competing risk models.
A total of 5,828 individuals were diagnosed with cancer (56.3 % males). During follow-up, 1,415 individuals died from cancer (60.2 % males) within five years after diagnosis. The hazard ratio (HR) of overall death of the cancer patients relative to the general population decreased from 1965 (from HR, 385.8 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 335.3, 443.4) in 1965-74 to HR, 19.7 (CI: 9.3, 41.5) in 2005-09). Over all, there were fewer cancer-related deaths among female compared with male patients (sub-hazard ratio (SHR), 0.83 (CI: 0.74, 0.92)). Except for all hematopoietic malignancies, adolescents and young adult patients had lower risk of cancer death than children.
The difference in risk of cancer and overall deaths between the cancer patients and the general population has been substantially reduced since 1965.
Notes
Erratum In: Cancer Causes Control. 2013 Dec;24(12):2253-6
PubMed ID
22706693 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy among term and postterm births.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141089
Source
JAMA. 2010 Sep 1;304(9):976-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2010
Author
Dag Moster
Allen J Wilcox
Stein Emil Vollset
Trond Markestad
Rolv Terje Lie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, PO Box 7804, N-5020 Bergen, Norway. Dag.Moster@smis.uib.no
Source
JAMA. 2010 Sep 1;304(9):976-82
Date
Sep-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Social Class
Abstract
Although preterm delivery is a well-established risk factor for cerebral palsy (CP), preterm deliveries contribute only a minority of affected infants. There is little information on the relation of CP risk to gestational age in the term range, where most CP occurs.
To determine whether timing of birth in the term and postterm period is associated with risk of CP.
Population-based follow-up study using the Medical Birth Registry of Norway to identify 1,682,441 singleton children born in the years 1967-2001 with a gestational age of 37 through 44 weeks and no congenital anomalies. The cohort was followed up through 2005 by linkage to other national registries.
Absolute and relative risk of CP for children surviving to at least 4 years of age.
Of the cohort of term and postterm children, 1938 were registered with CP in the National Insurance Scheme. Infants born at 40 weeks had the lowest risk of CP, with a prevalence of 0.99/1000 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-1.08). Risk for CP was higher with earlier or later delivery, with a prevalence at 37 weeks of 1.91/1000 (95% CI, 1.58-2.25) and a relative risk (RR) of 1.9 (95% CI, 1.6-2.4), a prevalence at 38 weeks of 1.25/1000 (95% CI, 1.07-1.42) and an RR of 1.3 (95% CI, 1.1-1.6), a prevalence at 42 weeks of 1.36/1000 (95% CI, 1.19-1.53) and an RR of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.2-1.6), and a prevalence after 42 weeks of 1.44 (95% CI, 1.15-1.72) and an RR of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.8). These associations were even stronger in a subset with gestational age based on ultrasound measurements: at 37 weeks the prevalence was 1.17/1000 (95% CI, 0.30-2.04) and the relative risk was 3.7 (95% CI, 1.5-9.1). At 42 weeks the prevalence was 0.85/1000 (95% CI, 0.33-1.38) and the relative risk was 2.4 (95% CI, 1.1-5.3). Adjustment for infant sex, maternal age, and various socioeconomic measures had little effect.
Compared with delivery at 40 weeks' gestation, delivery at 37 or 38 weeks or at 42 weeks or later was associated with an increased risk of CP.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20810375 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile: cerebral palsy in the Norwegian and Danish birth cohorts (MOBAND-CP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287693
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Sep 02;6(9):e012777
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-02-2016
Author
Mette C Tollånes
Katrine Strandberg-Larsen
Ingeborg Forthun
Tanja Gram Petersen
Dag Moster
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Camilla Stoltenberg
Jørn Olsen
Allen J Wilcox
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Sep 02;6(9):e012777
Date
Sep-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cerebral Palsy - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design.
MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts-the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort. MOBAND-CP includes maternal interview/questionnaire data collected during pregnancy and follow-up, plus linked information from national health registries.
Initial harmonisation of data from the 2 cohorts has created 140 variables for children and their mothers. In the MOBAND-CP cohort, 438 children with CP have been identified through record linkage with validated national registries, providing by far the largest such sample with prospectively collected detailed pregnancy data. Several studies investigating various hypotheses regarding CP aetiology are currently on-going.
Additional data can be harmonised as necessary to meet requirements of new projects. Biological specimens collected during pregnancy and at delivery are potentially available for assay, as are results from assays conducted on these specimens for other projects. The study size allows consideration of CP subtypes, which is rare in aetiological studies of CP. In addition, MOBAND-CP provides a platform within the context of a merged birth cohort of exceptional size that could, after appropriate permissions have been sought, be used for cohort and case-cohort studies of other relatively rare health conditions of infants and children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27591025 View in PubMed
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Country of first birth and neonatal outcomes in migrant and Norwegian-born parous women in Norway: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305589
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2020 Jun 15; 20(1):540
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-15-2020
Author
Eline S Vik
Roy M Nilsen
Vigdis Aasheim
Rhonda Small
Dag Moster
Erica Schytt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Kronstad, Inndalsveien 28, 5063, Bergen, Norway. eline.skirnisdottir.vik@hvl.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2020 Jun 15; 20(1):540
Date
Jun-15-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Order
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Norway
Odds Ratio
Perinatal Death
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Registries
Reproductive history
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study compares subsequent birth outcomes in migrant women who had already had a child before arriving in Norway with those in migrant women whose first birth occurred in Norway. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between country of first birth and adverse neonatal outcomes (very preterm birth, moderately preterm birth, post-term birth, small for gestational age, large for gestational age, low Apgar score, stillbirth and neonatal death) in parous migrant and Norwegian-born women.
National population-based study including second and subsequent singleton births in Norway from 1990 to 2016. Data were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Statistics Norway. Neonatal outcomes were compared between births to: 1) migrant women with a first birth before immigration to Norway (n?=?30,062) versus those with a first birth after immigration (n?=?66,006), and 2) Norwegian-born women with a first birth outside Norway (n?=?6205) versus those with a first birth in Norway (n?=?514,799). Associations were estimated as crude and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression.
Migrant women with a first birth before immigrating to Norway had increased odds of adverse outcomes in subsequent births relative to those with a first birth after immigration: very preterm birth (22-31 gestational weeks; aOR?=?1.27; CI 1.09-1.48), moderately preterm birth (32-36 gestational weeks; aOR?=?1.10; CI 1.02-1.18), post-term birth (=42 gestational weeks; aOR?=?1.19; CI 1.11-1.27), low Apgar score (
PubMed ID
32539855 View in PubMed
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Delay in intervention increases neonatal morbidity in births monitored with cardiotocography and ST-waveform analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106074
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2014 Feb;93(2):175-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Jörg Kessler
Dag Moster
Susanne Albrechtsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, Clinical Fetal Physiology Research Group, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2014 Feb;93(2):175-81
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Cardiotocography
Delivery, Obstetric
Electrocardiography
Female
Fetal Distress - diagnosis - physiopathology
Fetal Hypoxia - diagnosis - physiopathology
Fetal Monitoring - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heart Rate, Fetal - physiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk - physiology
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess the effect of the time interval from indication of hypoxia to delivery on neonatal outcome in high-risk pregnancies monitored with cardiotocography (CTG) and ST-waveform analysis.
Prospective observational study.
University hospital, Norway, 2004-08.
Singleton high-risk births with a gestational age above 35(+6) weeks, monitored with CTG and ST-waveform analysis.
Logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival plots.
Neonatal morbidity in relation to the rapidity of intervention.
Of 6010 deliveries monitored with ST-waveform analysis, 1131 (19%) had an indication to intervene for fetal distress according to clinical guidelines. Those fetuses were at increased risk of an adverse neonatal outcome, and if delivered later than 20 min after the indication of hypoxia their risk increased further; i.e. transfer to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from an odds ratio of 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.2) to an odds ratio of 3.3 (95% confidence interval 2.5-4.3). The indication-to-delivery interval was longer for neonates with a 5-min Apgar score of
PubMed ID
24251909 View in PubMed
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Economic independence in survivors of cancer diagnosed at a young age: A Norwegian national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282813
Source
Cancer. 2016 Dec 15;122(24):3873-3882
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2016
Author
Maria W Gunnes
Rolv Terje Lie
Tone Bjørge
Astri Syse
Ellen Ruud
Finn Wesenberg
Dag Moster
Source
Cancer. 2016 Dec 15;122(24):3873-3882
Date
Dec-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - economics
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The impact of cancer on socioeconomic outcomes is attracting attention as the number of survivors of cancer in young age continues to rise. This study examines economic independence in a national cohort of survivors of cancer at a young age in Norway.
Through the linkage of several national registries, the study cohort comprised 1,212,013 individuals born in Norway during 1965 through 1985, of which 5440 had received a cancer diagnosis before age 25 years. Follow-up was through 2007, and the main outcomes were receipt of governmental financial assistance, employment, income, and occupation. Analytic methods included Cox proportional hazard regression, log-binomial regression, and quantile regression models.
Individuals in the cancer survivor group had an increased probability of receiving governmental financial assistance (men: hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-1.5; women: HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.6) and of not being employed (men: HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7; women: HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6) compared with those in the noncancer group. Income discrepancies were particularly pronounced for survivors of central nervous system tumors. There was no difference in representation in higher skilled occupations.
Survivors of cancer at a young age in Norway had an increased risk of being economically dependent and unemployed. This was evident in several tumor groups and was most pronounced in female survivors. There were only small differences in income or representation in higher skilled occupations for most employed survivors compared with the noncancer group. The current results are important for understanding the impact of a cancer diagnosis at a young age on subsequent job market outcomes. Cancer 2016;122:3873-3882. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27518040 View in PubMed
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Educational attainment among long-term survivors of cancer in childhood and adolescence: a Norwegian population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275824
Source
J Cancer Surviv. 2016 Feb;10(1):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sara Ghaderi
Anders Engeland
Maria Winther Gunnes
Dag Moster
Ellen Ruud
Astri Syse
Finn Wesenberg
Tone Bjørge
Source
J Cancer Surviv. 2016 Feb;10(1):87-95
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The number of young cancer survivors has increased over the past few decades due to improvement in treatment regimens, and understanding of long-term effects among the survivors has become even more important. Educational achievements and choice of educational fields were explored here.
Five-year cancer survivors born in Norway during 1965-1985 (diagnosed
PubMed ID
25929213 View in PubMed
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