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A controlled intervention study to improve antibiotic use in a Russian paediatric hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158257
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2008 May;31(5):478-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Dag Berild
Tore G Abrahamsen
Stein Andresen
Egil Bjørløw
Ola Haug
Irina M Kossenko
Olga I Kubar
Michaela Lelek
Svetlana I Mintchenko
Maria F Pyasetskaya
Signe H Ringertz
Galina A Sysenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Aker University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. dag.berild@medisin.uio.no
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2008 May;31(5):478-83
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Gastroenteritis - drug therapy - microbiology
Guideline Adherence
Hospitals
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intervention Studies
Length of Stay
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A controlled intervention study was performed in a paediatric hospital in Russia to improve antibiotic use and to see whether improvements persisted. During October-December 2002, clinical and microbiological data, antibiotic use, costs and outcome were recorded at two wards for gastrointestinal infections (GIIs) and two wards for respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of infections were developed and implemented at one ward for GIIs and one ward for RTIs in 2003. The other two wards served as controls. The same data were recorded during the same 3-month periods in 2003 and 2004. At the intervention ward, the percentage of patients with GII who received antibiotics decreased from 94% in 2002 to 41% in 2003, but increased to 73% in 2004. In RTI patients these percentages were 90% in 2002, 53% in 2003 and 83% in 2004. The proportions of patients who received antibiotics in 2004 were still lower than in 2002: risk difference (RD)=0.217 (P
PubMed ID
18343641 View in PubMed
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