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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292349
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-07-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Ecology and Environmental Biology, Ghent University , 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Date
Nov-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Geologic sediments
Metals
North Sea
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286492
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Date
Oct-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
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Environmental effects of offshore produced water discharges: A review focused on the Norwegian continental shelf.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304655
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2020 Dec; 162:105155
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Jonny Beyer
Anders Goksøyr
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Jarle Klungsøyr
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: jonny.beyer@niva.no.
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2020 Dec; 162:105155
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Animals
Environmental monitoring
Extraction and Processing Industry
Norway
Petroleum - analysis - toxicity
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis - toxicity
Seawater
Water
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Produced water (PW), a large byproduct of offshore oil and gas extraction, is reinjected to formations or discharged to the sea after treatment. The discharges contain dispersed crude oil, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols (APs), metals, and many other constituents of environmental relevance. Risk-based regulation, greener offshore chemicals and improved cleaning systems have reduced environmental risks of PW discharges, but PW is still the largest operational source of oil pollution to the sea from the offshore petroleum industry. Monitoring surveys find detectable exposures in caged mussel and fish several km downstream from PW outfalls, but biomarkers indicate only mild acute effects in these sentinels. On the other hand, increased concentrations of DNA adducts are found repeatedly in benthic fish populations, especially in haddock. It is uncertain whether increased adducts could be a long-term effect of sediment contamination due to ongoing PW discharges, or earlier discharges of oil-containing drilling waste. Another concern is uncertainty regarding the possible effect of PW discharges in the sub-Arctic Southern Barents Sea. So far, research suggests that sub-arctic species are largely comparable to temperate species in their sensitivity to PW exposure. Larval deformities and cardiac toxicity in fish early life stages are among the biomarkers and adverse outcome pathways that currently receive much attention in PW effect research. Herein, we summarize the accumulated ecotoxicological knowledge of offshore PW discharges and highlight some key remaining knowledge needs.
PubMed ID
32992224 View in PubMed
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