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25 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Syed Morad Hameed
Nadine Schuurman
Tarek Razek
Darrell Boone
Rardi Van Heest
Tracey Taulu
Nasira Lakha
David C Evans
D Ross Brown
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Henry T Stelfox
Dianne Dyer
Mary van Wijngaarden-Stephens
Sarvesh Logsetty
Avery B Nathens
Tanya Charyk-Stewart
Sandro Rizoli
Lorraine N Tremblay
Frederick Brenneman
Najma Ahmed
Elsie Galbraith
Neil Parry
Murray J Girotti
Guiseppe Pagliarello
Nancy Tze
Kosar Khwaja
Natalie Yanchar
John M Tallon
J Andrew I Trenholm
Candance Tegart
Ofer Amram
Myriam Berube
Usmaan Hameed
Richard K Simons
Author Affiliation
Research Committee of the Trauma Association of Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. morad.hameed@vch.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Catchment Area (Health)
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Centers
Travel
Abstract
Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity, potential years of life lost and health care expenditure in Canada and around the world. Trauma systems have been established across North America to provide comprehensive injury care and to lead injury control efforts. We sought to describe the current status of trauma systems in Canada and Canadians' access to acute, multidisciplinary trauma care.
A national survey was used to identify the locations and capabilities of adult trauma centers across Canada and to identify the catchment populations they serve. Geographic information science methods were used to map the locations of Level I and Level II trauma centers and to define 1-hour road travel times around each trauma center. Data from the 2006 Canadian Census were used to estimate populations within and outside 1-hour access to definitive trauma care.
In Canada, 32 Level I and Level II trauma centers provide definitive trauma care and coordinate the efforts of their surrounding trauma systems. Most Canadians (77.5%) reside within 1-hour road travel catchments of Level I or Level II centers. However, marked geographic disparities in access persist. Of the 22.5% of Canadians who live more than an hour away from a Level I or Level II trauma centers, all are in rural and remote regions.
Access to high quality acute trauma care is well established across parts of Canada but a clear urban/rural divide persists. Regional efforts to improve short- and long-term outcomes after severe trauma should focus on the optimization of access to pre-hospital care and acute trauma care in rural communities using locally relevant strategies or novel care delivery options.
PubMed ID
20838258 View in PubMed
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The Alberta adult heart transplant experience: survival based on age, gender, etiology, ischemic times, bridge to transplant, and bicaval technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182882
Source
Transplant Proc. 2003 Nov;35(7):2471-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003

Application of principal component analysis to pharmacogenomic studies in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149314
Source
Pharmacogenomics J. 2009 Dec;9(6):362-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
H. Visscher
C J D Ross
M-P Dubé
A M K Brown
M S Phillips
B C Carleton
M R Hayden
Author Affiliation
Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Child and Family Research Institute, Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Pharmacogenomics J. 2009 Dec;9(6):362-72
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Biotransformation - genetics
Canada
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Ethnic Groups - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genetics, Population
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Pharmacogenetics - methods
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Principal Component Analysis
Abstract
Ethnicity can confound results in pharmacogenomic studies. Allele frequencies of loci that influence drug metabolism can vary substantially between different ethnicities and underlying ancestral genetic differences can lead to spurious findings in pharmacogenomic association studies. We evaluated the application of principal component analysis (PCA) in a pharmacogenomic study in Canada to detect and correct for genetic ancestry differences using genotype data from 2094 loci in 220 key drug biotransformation genes. Using 89 Coriell worldwide reference samples, we observed a strong correlation between principal component values and geographic origin. We further applied PCA to accurately infer the genetic ancestry in our ethnically diverse Canadian cohort of 524 patients from the GATC study of severe adverse drug reactions. We show that PCA can be successfully applied in pharmacogenomic studies using a limited set of markers to detect underlying differences in genetic ancestry thereby maximizing power and minimizing false-positive findings.
PubMed ID
19652663 View in PubMed
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Autosomal recessive cerebellar hypoplasia in the Hutterite population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172806
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2005 Oct;47(10):691-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Hannah C Glass
Kym M Boycott
Coleen Adams
Karen Barlow
James N Scott
Albert E Chudley
T Mary Fujiwara
Kenneth Morgan
Elaine Wirrell
D Ross McLeod
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2005 Oct;47(10):691-5
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Cerebellar Ataxia - etiology - genetics - pathology
Cerebellar Diseases - genetics - pathology
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - etiology - genetics - pathology
Child, Preschool
Female
Germany - ethnology
Humans
Inheritance Patterns
Intellectual Disability - etiology - genetics - pathology
Male
Retrospective Studies
Syndrome
Abstract
Cerebellar hypoplasia is a rare malformation caused by a variety of etiologies. It usually manifests clinically as non-progressive cerebellar ataxia with or without mental retardation. We further characterize a syndrome of autosomal recessive cerebellar hypoplasia in the Hutterite population, referred to as dysequilibrium syndrome (DES). We reviewed 12 patients (eight females, four males; age range 4 to 33 y) with this syndrome. Patients were examined and underwent a standard set of investigations to characterize better the clinical features, natural history, and neuroimaging of this syndrome. DES is an autosomal recessive disorder with distinct clinical features including global developmental delay, late ambulation (after age 6 y), truncal ataxia, and a static clinical course. Neuroimaging is characterized by hypoplasia of the inferior portion of the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and mild simplification of cortical gyri.
PubMed ID
16174313 View in PubMed
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Bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation with locked mandibular impaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127821
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2012 Feb;70(2):e116-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Sally L Hynes
Leigh A Jansen
D Ross Brown
Douglas J Courtemanche
James C Boyle
Author Affiliation
Division of Plastic Surgery, University of British Columbia, Burn, Plastic and Trauma Unit, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. SallyLHynes@gmail.com
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2012 Feb;70(2):e116-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Airway Obstruction - etiology
Alveolar Process - injuries
Bicycling - injuries
Bone Screws
Bone Wires
Dislocations - etiology
Humans
Jaw Fixation Techniques
Male
Mandible - surgery
Mandibular Injuries - etiology - surgery
Maxillary Fractures - etiology
Nasal Obstruction - etiology
Temporomandibular Joint - injuries
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Tooth Avulsion - etiology
Abstract
Bilateral anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation is very rare, with only 2 reported cases published. In the present report, we describe a healthy 25-year-old man from Haida Gwaii, in British Columbia, Canada, who was transferred to our tertiary trauma center with life-threatening complications of a bilateral anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation with locked mandibular impaction.
PubMed ID
22260912 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety: a model for safety pharmacology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142605
Source
Thyroid. 2010 Jul;20(7):681-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Colin J D Ross
Henk Visscher
Johanna Sistonen
Liam R Brunham
Kusala Pussegoda
Tenneille T Loo
Michael J Rieder
Gideon Koren
Bruce C Carleton
Michael R Hayden
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Thyroid. 2010 Jul;20(7):681-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Antithyroid Agents - adverse effects
Biomarkers, Pharmacological
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cisplatin - adverse effects
Codeine - poisoning
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - genetics - mortality - prevention & control
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic markers
Genetic Testing - methods
Humans
Individualized Medicine - methods
International Cooperation
Pharmacogenetics - methods
Population Surveillance - methods
Sentinel Surveillance
Abstract
Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) rank as one of the top 10 leading causes of death in the developed world, and the direct medical costs of ADRs exceed $100 billion annually in the United States alone. Pharmacogenomics research seeks to identify genetic factors that are responsible for individual differences in drug efficacy and susceptibility to ADRs. This has led to several genetic tests that are currently being used to provide clinical recommendations. The Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety is a nation-wide effort established in Canada to identify novel predictive genomic markers of severe ADRs in children and adults. A surveillance network has been established in 17 of Canada's major hospitals to identify patients experiencing specific ADRs and to collect biological samples and relevant clinical history for genetic association studies. To identify ADR-associated genetic markers that could be incorporated into predictive tests that will reduce the occurrence of serious ADRs, high-throughput genomic analyses are conducted with samples from patients that have suffered serious ADRs and matched control patients.
ADRs represent a significant unmet medical problem with significant morbidity and mortality, and Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety is a nation-wide network in Canada that seeks to identify genetic factors responsible for interindividual differences in susceptibility to serious ADRs.
Active ADR surveillance is necessary to identify and recruit patients who suffer from serious ADRs. National and international collaborations are required to recruit sufficient patients for these studies. Several pharmacogenomics tests are currently in clinical use to provide dosing recommendations, and the number of pharmacogenomics tests is expected to significantly increase in the future.
PubMed ID
20578893 View in PubMed
Less detail

The demographics of significant firearm injury in Canadian trauma centres and the associated predictors of inhospital mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155821
Source
Can J Surg. 2008 Jun;51(3):197-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Christian J Finley
David Hemenway
Joanne Clifton
D Ross Brown
Richard K Simons
S Morad Hameed
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. christianfinley@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2008 Jun;51(3):197-203
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Child
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Registries
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Trauma Centers
Wounds, Gunshot - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Our primary objective was to evaluate demographic and causal factors of inhospital mortality for significant firearm-related injuries (i.e., those with an Injury Severity Score [ISS] > 12) in Canadian trauma centres.
We analyzed data submitted to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) in the National Trauma Registry for all firearm-injured patients for fiscal years 1999-2003. Univariate and bivariate adjusting for ISS and multivariate logistic regression were performed.
Men accounted for 94% of the 784 injured. In all patients, the percentages of self-inflicted, intentional, unintentional and unknown injuries were 27.8%, 60.3%, 6.1% and 5.7%, respectively. The inhospital fatality rate was 39.8%, with 83% of fatalities occurring on the first day. Two-thirds of patients were discharged home. Univariate and adjusted analysis found that ISS, first systolic blood pressure (BP), first systolic BP under 100, first Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, age over 45 years, self-inflicted injury, intentional injury and injury at home significantly worsened the odds ratio of death in hospital and that police shooting was relatively beneficial. BP under 100, age over 45 years and a low GCS score had an adjusted odds ratio of death of 4.12, 1.99 and 0.64 per point increase, respectively. The multivariate model showed that ISS, BP under 100, first GCS score, sex and self-inflicted injury were significant in predicting inhospital death.
A predominance of young men are injured intentionally with handguns in Canada, whereas older patients suffer self-inflicted injuries with long guns. The significant number of firearm deaths, largely in the first day, highlights the importance of preventative strategies and the need for rapid transport of patients to trauma centres for urgent care.
Notes
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Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2006 Mar;13(3):314-2416495420
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Apr;151(4):606-88147463
Cites: Psychol Rep. 1994 Aug;75(1 Pt 1):81-27984755
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2000 Mar;35(3):258-6610692193
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Cites: Death Stud. 2003 Feb-Mar;27(2):103-2412675070
Cites: J Trauma. 2004 Jun;56(6):1206-1015211126
Cites: Psychol Rep. 2004 Jun;94(3 Pt 1):819-2615217033
Cites: J Trauma. 1974 Mar;14(3):187-964814394
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Jun 14;273(22):1749-547769767
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PubMed ID
18682765 View in PubMed
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Differential effect of the rs4149056 variant in SLCO1B1 on myopathy associated with simvastatin and atorvastatin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137825
Source
Pharmacogenomics J. 2012 Jun;12(3):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
L R Brunham
P J Lansberg
L. Zhang
F. Miao
C. Carter
G K Hovingh
H. Visscher
J W Jukema
A F Stalenhoef
C J D Ross
B C Carleton
J J P Kastelein
M R Hayden
Author Affiliation
Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Pharmacogenomics J. 2012 Jun;12(3):233-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heptanoic Acids - adverse effects
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Diseases - chemically induced - genetics
Netherlands
Odds Ratio
Organic Anion Transporters - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pyrroles - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Simvastatin - adverse effects
Abstract
Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in appropriately selected patients. However, statin-associated myopathy is a significant risk associated with these agents. Recently, variation in the SLCO1B1 gene was reported to predict simvastatin-associated myopathy. The aim of this study was to replicate association of the rs4149056 variant in SLCO1B1 with severe statin-associated myopathy in a cohort of patients using a variety of statin medications and to investigate the association with specific statin types. We identified 25 cases of severe statin-associated myopathy and 84 controls matched for age, gender, statin type and dose. The rs4149056 variant in SLCO1B1 was not significantly associated with myopathy in this group as a whole. However, when subjects were stratified by statin type, the SLCO1B1 rs4149056 genotype was significantly associated with myopathy in patients who received simvastatin, but not in patients who received atorvastatin. Our findings provide further support for a role for SLCO1B1 genotype in simvastatin-associated myopathy, and suggest that this association may be stronger for simvastatin compared with atorvastatin.
Notes
Comment In: Pharmacogenomics. 2011 Jun;12(6):773-821692611
PubMed ID
21243006 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genotypic approaches to therapy in children: a national active surveillance network (GATC) to study the pharmacogenomics of severe adverse drug reactions in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161010
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007 Sep;1110:177-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Colin J D Ross
Bruce Carleton
Dana G Warn
Sunita B Stenton
Shahrad Rod Rassekh
Michael R Hayden
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007 Sep;1110:177-92
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Disease
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Genome, Human - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Pharmacogenetics
Abstract
A striking failure of modern medicine is the debilitating and lethal consequences of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), which rank as one of the top 10 leading causes of death and illness in the developed world with direct medical costs of 137-177 billion annually US dollars in the USA. Although many factors influence the effect of medications (e.g., age, organ function, drug interactions), genetic factors account for 20% to 95% of drug response variability and play a significant role in the incidence and severity of ADRs. The field of pharmacogenomics seeks to identify genetic factors responsible for individual differences in drug efficacy and ADRs. Pharmacogenomics has led to several genetic tests that provide clinical dosing recommendations. The Genetic Approaches to Therapy in Children (GATC) project is a national project established in Canada to identify novel predictive genomic markers for severe ADRs in children. An ADR surveillance network has been established in eight of Canada's major children's hospitals, serving up to 75% of all Canadian children. The goal of the project is to identify patients experiencing specific ADRs and matched controls, collect DNA samples, and apply genomics-based technologies to identify ADR-associated genetic markers with the goal of preventing serious ADRs in susceptible children.
PubMed ID
17911433 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genotypic Approaches to Therapy in Children (GATC): using information technology to improve drug safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151432
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
E. Wong
B C Carleton
D F B Wright
M A Smith
L. Verbeek
C A Hildebrand
P. Stannard
R. Vaillancourt
P. Elliot-Miller
C J D Ross
M R Hayden
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada. WONG@cheo.on.ca
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:209-14
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child, Preschool
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Genome, Human - genetics
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Medical Informatics
Pharmacogenetics
Population Surveillance
Abstract
Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Current models of ADR surveillance have repeatedly demonstrated little pragmatic value to practicing clinicians. ADR reporting rates in the US and Canada suggest that only 5% of ADRs are reported. The Genotypic Approaches to Therapy in Children (GATC) network was established to identify and solve drug safety problems in paediatrics. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms underlie a significant portion of concentration-dependent ADRs in children. Our objective was to establish an ADR active surveillance network in paediatric hospitals across Canada. Surveillance clinicians evaluate clinical information from ADR cases and drug-matched controls, and collected DNA samples from all patients. The surveillance network will enable the identification of predictive genomic-markers for ADRs. With this knowledge, children at risk can be identified before therapy is initiated and enable personalized adjustments to therapy based on genetic make-up.
PubMed ID
19380938 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.