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[4-year experiences with computer-assisted registration of postoperative wound infections and identification of risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226352
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-1991
Author
A. Bremmelgaard
A M Sørensen
E. Brems-Dalgaard
D. Raahave
J V Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Frederiksberg Hospital, klinisk mikrobiologisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Date
May-13-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
A continuous record of postoperative surgical infections was carried out by electronic data processing of 9,181 orthopaedic and general operations. The overall infection rate was 5.7%, ranging from 2.0% (clean wounds) to 22.1% (dirty wounds). The corresponding deep infection rates were 1.7%, 0.4% and 5.4%, respectively. Employing a multiple logistic regression analysis, ten risk factors were evaluated. Factors found to be significant for both departments were: wound contamination, duration of operation and age. In addition, in the department of orthopaedic surgery: date of operation and surgeon, and in the department of general surgery: planning of operation, length of preoperative stay and anatomic groups. Sex had no influence on postoperative infection. Significant factors altered during the four years. Postoperative stay was, on an average, 13.9 days longer in infected patients.
PubMed ID
2028549 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Automatic data processing registration of postoperative wound infections. A prevalence study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233324
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Mar 14;150(11):649-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-1988

Computer-aided surveillance of surgical infections and identification of risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231793
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1989 Jan;13(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
A. Bremmelgaard
D. Raahave
R. Beier-Holgersen
J V Pedersen
S. Andersen
A I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1989 Jan;13(1):1-18
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Denmark
Hospital Departments
Humans
Models, Statistical
Orthopedics
Risk factors
Surgery Department, Hospital
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A continuous record of postoperative surgical infections was carried out by electronic data processing (EDP) of 4340 orthopaedic and general operations. The overall infection rate was 6.3%, ranging from 2.3% (clean wounds) to 27.1% (dirty wounds). The corresponding deep infection rates were 1.6%, 0.4% and 4.6%. Employing a multiple logistic regression analysis, 10 risk factors were evaluated. Factors found to be significant were: wound contamination, department, duration of operation, date of operation and age, and in addition for the department of general surgery: surgeon, planning of operation, length of preoperative stay and anatomic groups. A statistical model for identification of risk patients is described. Postoperative stay was on average 20.5 days longer in infected patients. We find that EDP-recording may result in an annual cost reduction of at least 175,000 pounds for our hospital.
PubMed ID
2564012 View in PubMed
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[Danish physicians underestimate blood-borne transmission. A first case of HIV infection in a surgeon transmitted from a patient is documented]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7683
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Mar 16;160(12):1769
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-1998

[Difficulties in continuous computer-assisted registration of postoperative wound infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226351
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1420-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-1991
Author
A M Sørensen
E. Brems-Dalgaard
A. Bremmelgard
D. Raahave
J V Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Frederiksberg Hospital, ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1420-2
Date
May-13-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology
Abstract
To improve the frequency of primary registration and reduce the time spent on continuous registration of postoperative wound infections by electronic data processing (EDP), we analysed the failures made during a two year period, where and by whom they were made. 16.9% of the operations and 0.4% of the infections had not been registered primarily, and all involved groups had made mistakes, but the surgeons were responsible for 69.2% of the missing registrations. This study shows that reliable registration of infections requires frequent instruction of all groups, especially the surgeons, frequent reports of infections in the ward and for each surgeon, and that the registrations are continuously controlled and at the end of year.
PubMed ID
2028550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217190
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
K B Poulsen
A. Bremmelgaard
A I Sørensen
D. Raahave
J V Petersen
Author Affiliation
National Center for Hospital Hygiene, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Costs
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Social Security - economics
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures.
Notes
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Cites: J Infect Dis. 1980 Feb;141(2):248-576767793
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Cites: World J Surg. 1982 May;6(3):362-57113241
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Cites: J Hosp Infect. 1989 Jan;13(1):1-182564012
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1990 Feb;11(2):89-932107250
Cites: Arch Surg. 1990 Jun;125(6):794-8032346380
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jul 16;152(29):2106-102399578
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-92028549
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1420-22028550
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Apr;30(4):373-61556884
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1992 Oct;39(5):467-701424821
PubMed ID
7925666 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jan 9;151(2):100-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1989
Author
J. Krogh
P. Jess
D. Raahave
H. Göte
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jan 9;151(2):100-1
Date
Jan-9-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Sutures - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
In a retrospective study during the last ten years of postoperative wound infections, six cases of late infections were found with a maximum latency of 30 years. A combination of non-absorbable suture materials together with underlying disease seems to have initiated the late formation of wound abscesses. The use of non-absorbable suture seems to involve a life long risk of infection.
PubMed ID
2911893 View in PubMed
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New operative technique to reduce surgeons' risk of HIV infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8252
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1991 Jun;18 Suppl A:177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
D. Raahave
A. Bremmelgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1991 Jun;18 Suppl A:177-83
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asepsis - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
HIV-1
Humans
Models, Statistical
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Perioperative Nursing - methods
Risk factors
Surgery
Surgical Instruments - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - methods
Abstract
The surgical team is potentially at risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from the patient. Assuming that the probability of an accidental injury during surgery is 0.01 (P2), the prevalence of HIV is 0.01 (P3) and the seroconversion rate is 0.01 (P1), we have estimated the risk (actuarial model) for a surgeon as 0.2% per year, and 5.82% for 30 years of surgery. In view of this we have made changes in surgical technique to reduce the risk to the surgical team from splash or injury. The surgeon must handle tissue with instruments only and minimize the use of fingers. Whenever possible, sharp instruments should be replaced by a blunt type. The surgical nurse loads needles to the needle carrier using forceps. Sharp instruments are placed in a neutral zone on the nurse's stand so that the surgeon and the nurse never touch the same sharp instrument at the same time. Movements should be controlled, and instrument handling accompanied by eye contact. We consider that these changes will reduce the risk of accidental injuries and thereby the transmission of HIV during operations to a greater degree than knowledge of the patient's HIV status.
PubMed ID
1716276 View in PubMed
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[Risk of HIV transmission to surgeons]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7750
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Feb 24;159(9):1226
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1997

Survival of patients with surgical wound infection: a case-control study of common surgical interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215918
Source
Br J Surg. 1995 Feb;82(2):208-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
K B Poulsen
C H Wachmann
A. Bremmelgaard
A I Sørensen
D. Raahave
J V Petersen
Author Affiliation
National Center for Hospital Hygiene.
Source
Br J Surg. 1995 Feb;82(2):208-9
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
A cohort of 4515 surgical patients was selected from ten different surgical intervention groups, and 291 of 317 with a postoperative wound infection were matched 1:1 with controls with regard to intervention, sex and age. The mortality rate was investigated from the time of operation, with a follow-up period from 4 years 4 months to 8 years 4 months. Eighty-seven patients with a deep infection had a significantly increased mortality rate, with a risk ratio of 1.7. Without a distinction between superficial and deep infection the former might mask the higher mortality rate associated with the latter.
PubMed ID
7749691 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.