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Epidemiology of intestinal and diffuse types of gastric carcinoma: a time-trend study in Finland with comparison between studies from high- and low-risk areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218716
Source
Cancer. 1994 Mar 1;73(5):1533
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1994
Author
A. Amorosi
D. Palli
Source
Cancer. 1994 Mar 1;73(5):1533
Date
Mar-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Notes
Comment On: Cancer. 1993 May 15;71(10):2926-338490820
PubMed ID
8111723 View in PubMed
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Histopathologic classification of breast cancer in Sweden and Italy: a comparison between two pathologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24376
Source
Tumori. 1992 Aug 31;78(4):247-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-31-1992
Author
D. Palli
S. Bianchi
F. Linell
A. Russo
A. Cariddi
F. Rank
M. Rosselli del Turco
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Unit, C.S.P.O., Florence, Italy.
Source
Tumori. 1992 Aug 31;78(4):247-9
Date
Aug-31-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - classification - pathology
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Italy
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
World Health Organization
Abstract
Two large series of breast cancers (BC), identified in the Pathology Departments of Malmö (Sweden) and Florence (Italy), were independently reviewed by two experienced pathologists, one from each department. Overall, comparison of diagnoses of 372 BCs according to a simplified WHO histologic classification system (in four combined categories) revealed agreement for 74% of the cases. Concordance, as measured by the kappa statistic, was relatively good (0.53 overall). Kappa values for specific categories were also acceptable, being highest for "invasive lobular" BC (0.63) and lowest for "other types" (0.45). The kappa value for "noninvasive" versus all other categories of invasive BC was 0.53. Some BCs were systematically classified as "noninvasive" by one pathologist and as "invasive ductal with a predominant intraductal component" by the other. Invasive lobular BCs were also diagnosed more frequently by one pathologist. These findings suggest that when planning geographical or temporal comparisons of distribution for BC histologic categories, standardization of classification and a centralized review may play an important role.
PubMed ID
1466080 View in PubMed
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