Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Agroenvironmental determinants associated with the presence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in beach waters in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132370
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
P. Turgeon
P. Michel
P. Levallois
P. Chevalier
D. Daignault
B. Crago
R. Irwin
S A McEwen
N F Neumann
M. Louie
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada. patricia.turgeon@umontreal.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bathing Beaches
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Human Activities
Humans
Lakes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Quebec
Seasons
Time Factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Exposure to microorganisms resistant to antimicrobials may constitute a health risk to human populations. It is believed that one route of exposure occurs when people engage in recreational activities in water contaminated with these microorganisms. The main objective of this study was to explore population-level and environmental determinants specifically associated with the presence of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) generic Escherichia coli isolated from recreational waters sampled from beaches located in southern Quebec, Canada. Water samples originated from the Quebec provincial beach surveillance program for the summers of 2004 and 2005. This study focused on three classes of determinants, namely: agricultural, population-level and beach characteristics for a total of 19 specific factors. The study was designed as a retrospective observational analysis and factors were assessed using logistic regression methods. From the multivariable analysis, the data suggested that the percentage of land used for spreading liquid manure was a significant factor associated with the presence of AMR E. coli (OR=27.73). Conceptually, broad factors potentially influencing the presence of AMR bacteria in water must be assessed specifically in addition to factors associated with general microbial contamination. Presence of AMR E. coli in recreational waters from beaches in southern Quebec may represent a risk for people engaging in water activities and this study provides preliminary evidence that agricultural practices, specifically spreading liquid manure in agricultural lands nearby beaches, may be linked to the contamination of these waters by AMR E. coli.
PubMed ID
21824340 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) Farm Program: results from finisher pig surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138988
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:71-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
A. Deckert
S. Gow
L. Rosengren
D. Léger
B. Avery
D. Daignault
L. Dutil
R. Reid-Smith
R. Irwin
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Canada. anne_deckert@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:71-84
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - veterinary
Population Surveillance
Salmonella - drug effects - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - drug therapy - microbiology
Abstract
In 2006, the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) Farm Program was implemented in sentinel grower-finisher swine herds in Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. Herds were visited 1-3 times annually. Faecal samples were collected from pens of close-to-market (CTM) weight (>80 kg) pigs and antimicrobial use (AMU) data were collected via questionnaires. Samples were cultured for generic Escherichia coli and Salmonella and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. This paper describes the findings of this program between 2006 and 2008. Eighty-nine, 115 and 96 herds participated in this program in 2006, 2007 and 2008 respectively. Over the 3 years, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) levels remained consistent. During this period, resistance to one or more antimicrobials was detected in 56-63% of the Salmonella spp. isolates and 84-86% of E. coli isolates. Resistance to five or more antimicrobials was detected in 13-23% of Salmonella and 12-13% of E. coli. Resistance to drugs classified as very important to human health (Category I) by the Veterinary Drug Directorate (VDD), Health Canada, was less than or equal to 1% in both organisms. AMU data were provided by 100 herds in 2007 and 95 herds in 2008. Nine herds in 2007 and five herds in 2008 reported no AMU. The most common route of antimicrobial administration (75-79% of herds) was via feed, predominantly macrolides/lincosamides (66-68% of herds). In both 2007 and 2008, the primary reasons given for macrolide/lincosamide use were disease prevention, growth promotion and treatment of enteric disease. The Category I antimicrobials, ceftiofur and virginiamycin were not used in feed or water in any herds in 2008, but virginiamycin was used in feed in two herds in 2007. Parenteral ceftiofur was used in 29 herds (29%) in 2007 and 20 herds (21%) in 2008. The reasons for ceftiofur use included treatment of lameness, respiratory disease and enteric disease.
PubMed ID
21083820 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates of bovine and human origin by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199872
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Jan;38(1):71-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
G. Martinez
J. Harel
R. Higgins
S. Lacouture
D. Daignault
M. Gottschalk
Author Affiliation
Groupe de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses du Porc, Faculté de médecine vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, St-Hyacinthe, Québec J2S 7C6, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Jan;38(1):71-8
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Cattle
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA Primers
Dairying
Female
Genetic Variation
Geography
Humans
Mastitis, Bovine - epidemiology - microbiology
Milk - microbiology
Quebec
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique
Serotyping
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus agalactiae - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Streptococcus agalactiae is considered one of the major causes of bovine intramammary infections. It is also found in the vaginas of women without any apparent clinical symptoms, but reports of neonatal infections, causing significant morbidity, are relatively frequent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of S. agalactiae strains isolated from bovine milk and from asymptomatic women in Qu?bec, Canada, by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. A total of 185 bovine isolates and 38 human isolates were first serotyped for capsular polysaccharide by double diffusion in agarose gel (bovine isolates) and coagglutination (human isolates). Strains were then studied by RAPD using 3 primers, designated OPS11, OPB17, and OPB18, which were selected from 12 primers. Thirty-eight percent of bovine isolates and 82% of human isolates could be serotyped. Prevalent serotypes were type III (28%) for bovine isolates and types V (26%) and III (24%) for human isolates. RAPD results showed that, taken together, all isolates (of bovine and human origin) shared 58% similarity. Ninety-four percent of these isolates were clustered in four groups (I, II, III, and IV) with 70% similarity among them. Three clusters, A (48 isolates), B (14 isolates), and C (32 isolates), with 79 to 80% similarity were identified within group IV, whereas the three other groups did not present any clusters. Despite some clustering of human isolates, relatively high diversity was seen among them. Relatively high heterogeneity was observed with the RAPD profiles, not only for field strains belonging to different serotypes but also for those within a given serotype.
Notes
Cites: J Dairy Sci. 1970 Sep;53(9):1151-614917018
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1998 May;177(5):1308-139593017
Cites: Medicine (Baltimore). 1977 Nov;56(6):457-73335186
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B. 1979 Apr;87B(2):77-83108920
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1984 Oct;57(2):273-86389463
Cites: Res Vet Sci. 1985 Mar;38(2):202-82988092
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Nov;26(11):2465-63069867
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Jun;27(6):1352-62666444
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1990 Nov 25;18(22):6531-51979162
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1990 Dec 25;18(24):7213-82259619
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Dec;28(12):2834-62280021
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1991 Dec;71(6):478-831778843
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1992 Mar;165(3):569-731347059
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1992 Sep;166(3):574-91380050
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1992 Sep;30(9):2471-31401018
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1993 Oct;168(4):904-98376836
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1993 Aug;17(2):153-62; quiz 163-48399860
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Oct;31(10):2616-208253957
Cites: Res Microbiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;144(6):457-657910694
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1995 Feb;171(2):5137844407
Cites: APMIS. 1994 Dec;102(12):925-307888161
Cites: Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1995 Sep;42(7):427-338594856
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Oct;33(10):2576-818567885
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 1996 Aug;33(4):279-878864940
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1996 Nov;34(11):2741-78897176
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1996 Dec;117(3):417-228972664
Cites: J Dairy Sci. 1997 Mar;80(3):464-709098795
Cites: Am J Vet Res. 1997 May;58(5):482-79140555
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1997 Jun;118(3):215-209207731
Cites: Can Vet J. 1997 Jul;38(7):429-379220132
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Oct;35(10):2573-99316910
Cites: Mol Cell Probes. 1997 Oct;11(5):349-549375294
Cites: Can Vet J. 1998 Jan;39(1):33-89442950
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1977 Sep;6(3):266-70332711
PubMed ID
10618066 View in PubMed
Less detail