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Brain injury in a forensic psychiatry population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159906
Source
Brain Inj. 2007 Dec;21(13-14):1353-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
A. Colantonio
V. Stamenova
C. Abramowitz
D. Clarke
B. Christensen
Author Affiliation
Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. angela.colantonio@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2007 Dec;21(13-14):1353-60
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Crime - psychology
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The prevalence and profile of adults with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been studied in large North American forensic mental health populations. This study investigated how adults with a documented history of TBI differed with the non-TBI forensic population with respect to demographics, psychiatric diagnoses and history of offences.
A retrospective chart review of all consecutive admissions to a forensic psychiatry programme in Toronto, Canada was conducted. Information on history of TBI, psychiatric diagnoses, living environments and types of criminal offences were obtained from medical records.
History of TBI was ascertained in 23% of 394 eligible patient records. Compared to those without a documented history of TBI, persons with this history were less likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia but more likely to have alcohol/substance abuse disorder. There were also differences observed with respect to offence profiles.
This study provides evidence to support routine screening for a history of TBI in forensic psychiatry.
PubMed ID
18066937 View in PubMed
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Depression in holocaust survivors: profile and treatment outcome in a geriatric day hospital program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198869
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2000 Apr;15(4):331-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
D K Conn
D. Clarke
R. Van Reekum
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, North York, Canada. d.conn@utoronto.ca
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2000 Apr;15(4):331-7
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Community Mental Health Centers - statistics & numerical data
Day Care - statistics & numerical data
Depression - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Holocaust
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - therapy
Survivors - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The profile of depressive symptoms and the outcome of treatment in Holocaust Survivors (HS) versus non-Holocaust Survivors (NS), attending a Psychiatric Day Hospital Program for depression, were evaluated retrospectively using a clinical database. Approximately 24% of the study population were Holocaust Survivors (HS). The HS group was more likely to receive a diagnosis of major depressive disorder or episode as one of their diagnoses. The HS group, in particular those survivors who had been in ghettos or in concentration camps, were more likely to be given a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. Both groups showed improvement from baseline in their ratings of depression on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Geriatric Depression Scale at the time of discharge (p
PubMed ID
10767733 View in PubMed
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Inhibition of Akt phosphorylation by thrombin, histamine and lysophosphatidylcholine in endothelial cells. Differential role of protein kinase C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9708
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2003 Jun;168(2):245-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Brynhildur Thors
Haraldur Halldórsson
Gudrun D Clarke
Gudmundur Thorgeirsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, P.O. Box 8216, 128 Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2003 Jun;168(2):245-53
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cells, Cultured
Endothelium, Vascular - cytology - metabolism
Enzyme Activation - drug effects
Epidermal Growth Factor - pharmacology
Histamine - pharmacology
Humans
Isoenzymes - physiology
Lysophosphatidylcholines - pharmacology
Lysophospholipids
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - metabolism
Nitric Oxide Synthase - metabolism
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III
Phospholipase C - metabolism - physiology
Phosphorylation - drug effects
Protein Kinase C - physiology
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sphingosine - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Thrombin - pharmacology
Abstract
The protein kinase Akt is involved in embryonic vascular development and neoangiogenesis as well as in several endothelial cell functions, including activation of endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS) and promotion of endothelial cell survival. We have examined the effects of G-protein activators thrombin and histamine as well as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) on Akt phosphorylation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Akt phosphorylation was analyzed with the phosphospecific Akt (Ser473) antibody by Western blotting. While epidermal growth factor (EGF) was a potent stimulator of Akt phosphorylation histamine, thrombin and LPC blocked its activation when used in cotreatment with EGF. Following inhibition or downregulation of protein kinase C (PKC), the inhibitory effect of both histamine and thrombin on the endothelial response to EGF was prevented. Furthermore, stimulation of PKC, using short-term 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment, markedly inhibited the stimulatory effects of EGF on Akt phosphorylation. Rottlerin, an inhibitor of the PKCdelta, but not Gö6976, which is an inhibitor of alpha, beta, gamma and isoforms, reversed the inhibitory effects of histamine. Conversely, inhibition or downregulation of PKC did not prevent the inhibitory effect of LPC. Akt phosphorylation was also increased by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) treatment and this activity was influenced by the various cotreatments in the same way as the activation by EGF. Overall, this study demonstrated that the G-protein activators thrombin and histamine inhibited both EGF- and S1P-mediated Akt phosphorylation in HUVEC by activation of PKCdelta, while the inhibitory effects of LPC were independent of PKCdelta.
PubMed ID
12801607 View in PubMed
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Relationship of psychosis to aggression, apathy and function in dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195428
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;16(2):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
M J Rapoport
R. van Reekum
M. Freedman
D. Streiner
M. Simard
D. Clarke
T. Cohen
D. Conn
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, North York, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3MS.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;16(2):123-30
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Affective Symptoms
Aged
Aggression
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delusions - epidemiology
Dementia - complications
Female
Hallucinations - epidemiology
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
Psychosis has been associated with aggression in dementia, but the nature of this relationship has been unclear. There has been very little research into the relations between apathy and functional status to psychosis in dementia. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between psychosis and aggression, apathy, and functional status in outpatients with dementia.
The presence of psychosis was assessed by clinical interview and two scales: the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Columbia University Scale for Psychopathology in Alzheimer's Disease. The maximum likelihood estimation technique was used to determine the best estimate of the presence of psychosis. Aggression, apathy, and functional status (activities of daily living: ADLs) were measured using structured instruments.
Sixty-one subjects were included. The CUSPAD and NPI provided low false positive and negative rates. ANCOVA analyses showed that psychosis was significantly associated with aggression, even when controlling for apathy, depression, and ADLs. Psychosis was related to apathy only when depression was controlled for. Hallucinations were related to impaired basic ADLs, even when depression and apathy were controlled for.
Relationships were found between psychotic symptoms in dementia and aggression as well as apathy and impaired functional status. These relationships suggest pathophysiologic mechanisms and have possible treatment implications.
PubMed ID
11241716 View in PubMed
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What factors contribute to senior psychiatry residents' interest in geriatric psychiatry? a Delphi study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195871
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;45(10):912-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
S J Lieff
D. Clarke
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, 3560 Bathurst Street, Toronto, ON M6A 2E1.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;45(10):912-6
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Choice
Curriculum
Delphi Technique
Female
Geriatric Psychiatry - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Ontario
Psychiatry - education
Specialization
Abstract
To generate hypotheses regarding factors that influence senior psychiatric residents, to consider treating geriatric patients in their future practices.
Using the Delphi technique, designed to generate ideas and consensus, we asked psychiatry residents at the University of Toronto who had completed, or were completing, their geriatric rotation about the factors they thought might influence residents in devoting some of their practice to geriatric patients. Residents then rated the degree of influence of these factors which had been synthesized into a questionnaire.
Twenty-six items were rated according to their degree of influence. The most influential item was positive clinical experiences with seniors. This was followed closely by supervisor characteristics such as enthusiasm, role modeling, competence, and mentoring. Interest in and comfort with the medical psychiatric and neuropsychiatric nature of the field were also felt to be influential.
The factors that influence senior psychiatry resident interest in the practice of geriatric psychiatry are primarily educational and result from exposure to the field under optimal educational circumstances (positive clinical experiences and excellent supervisors). The medical and neuropsychiatric nature of the field also likely exerts a unique influence and should be considered in stimulating interest in this population.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Psychiatry. 2001 May;46(4):373-411387801
PubMed ID
11190360 View in PubMed
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