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Canadian home parenteral nutrition (HPN) registry: validation and patient outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127079
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2012 Jul;36(4):407-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
G. Fernandes
B. Kaila
K N Jeejeebhoy
L. Gramlich
D. Armstrong
J P Allard
Author Affiliation
University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2012 Jul;36(4):407-14
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bilirubin - blood
Canada
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Liver Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Parenteral Nutrition, Home - adverse effects - methods
Potassium - blood
Quality of Life
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In Canada, there are an estimated 400 home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients. In 2006, a registry was created to gather patient outcome information. The aim of this study was to validate the registry and report on HPN patient outcomes.
Several demographic, clinical parameters were collected. For the validation, paired t test and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess agreement between repeat entries. For the outcome report, paired t test was used to assess changes, and survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results are expressed as mean ± SEM.
On validation, there was high correlation/agreement (P
PubMed ID
22326909 View in PubMed
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Cancer Care Ontario Colonoscopy Standards: standards and evidentiary base.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160042
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Nov;21 Suppl D:5D-24D
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
L. Rabeneck
R B Rumble
J. Axler
A. Smith
D. Armstrong
C. Vinden
P. Belliveau
K. Rhodes
C. Zwaal
V. Mai
P. Dixon
Author Affiliation
Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada. linda.rabeneck@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Nov;21 Suppl D:5D-24D
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - diagnosis
Clinical Competence
Colonoscopy - standards
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Conscious Sedation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Mass Screening - standards
Ontario
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Resuscitation
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive - education
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cause of non-tobacco-related cancer deaths in Canadian men and women, accounting for 10% of all cancer deaths. An estimated 7800 men and women will be diagnosed with CRC, and 3250 will die from the disease in Ontario in 2007. Given that CRC incidence and mortality rates in Ontario are among the highest in the world, the best opportunity to reduce this burden of disease would be through screening. The present report describes the findings and recommendations of Cancer Care Ontario's Colonoscopy Standards Expert Panel, which was convened in March 2006 by the Program in Evidence-Based Care. The recommendations will form the basis of the quality assurance program for colonoscopy delivered in support of Ontario's CRC screening program.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18026582 View in PubMed
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New mental retardation syndrome associated with ocular colobomas, cleft palate, and genital, skeletal, and craniofacial abnormalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191838
Source
Am J Med Genet. 2002 Jan 22;107(3):237-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2002
Author
M M Khalifa
S. Cappon
D. Soboleski
D. Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Queen's University and Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. khalifam@post.queensu.ca
Source
Am J Med Genet. 2002 Jan 22;107(3):237-42
Date
Jan-22-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - genetics - pathology
Child, Preschool
Cleft Palate - pathology
Coloboma - pathology
Craniofacial Abnormalities
Eye Abnormalities
Genitalia, Male - abnormalities
Humans
Infant
Intellectual Disability - pathology
Karyotyping
Male
Skull - abnormalities
Syndrome
Abstract
We describe three Canadian brothers of Cree origin, with a previously undescribed pattern of malformation including distinctive craniofacial abnormalities with triangular facies, hypertelorism, low-set and posteriorly rotated ears, ocular colobomas, ptosis, brachycephaly with widely separated sutures, cleft soft palate, undescended testes, bifid scrotum and hypospadius, wide webbed neck, webbed fingers, pectus excavatum and hypersegmented sternum, and severe psychomotor retardation. The presence of normal brain imaging and physical growth distinguishes them from other syndromes with overlapping abnormalities. This is either an X-linked or autosomal recessive condition.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Med Genet. 2002 Jul 22;111(1):106; author reply 107-812124746
PubMed ID
11807906 View in PubMed
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Posterior fossa medulloblastoma in childhood: treatment results and a proposal for a new staging system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228601
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1990 Aug;19(2):265-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
D. Jenkin
K. Goddard
D. Armstrong
L. Becker
M. Berry
H. Chan
M. Doherty
M. Greenberg
B. Hendrick
H. Hoffman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1990 Aug;19(2):265-74
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebellar Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Cranial Fossa, Posterior
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Medulloblastoma - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
Seventy-two children with posterior fossa medulloblastoma were diagnosed at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, from 1977 to 1987 and treated by standard methods. The 5- and 10-year survival and disease-free survival rates were 71% and 63%, and 64% and 63%, respectively. Total tumor resection, as determined by the surgeon was the most significant favorable prognostic factor. Post-operative meningitis, a residual enhancing mass lesion on the post-operative, pre irradiation CT scan and dissemination to the brain or cord at diagnosis were unfavorable factors. These four easily definable factors were used to define a staging system with prognostic significance. Five-year disease-free survival rates were for Stage I (total resection, no adverse factor) 100%, Stage II (total resection with one or more adverse factor or less than total resection with no other adverse factor) 78%, and Stage III (less than total resection with one or more adverse factor) 18%. Evaluation of treatment results in medulloblastoma requires that these prognostic factors be known.
PubMed ID
2394606 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of Barrett's oesophagus in a cohort of 1040 Canadian primary care patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia undergoing prompt endoscopy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170693
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Mar 1;23(5):595-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2006
Author
S J O Veldhuyzen van Zanten
A B R Thomson
A N Barkun
D. Armstrong
N. Chiba
R J White
S. Escobedo
P. Sinclair
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. zanten@dal.ca
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Mar 1;23(5):595-9
Date
Mar-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Barrett Esophagus - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dyspepsia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Esophagitis, Peptic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Esophagoscopy - methods
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Helicobacter Infections - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Hernia, Hiatal - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Abstract
The prevalence of Barrett's oesophagus in patients undergoing gastroscopy may be influenced by possible referral bias.
To present the prevalence of Barrett's oesophagus from the the Canadian Adult Dyspepsia Empirical Therapy Prompt Endoscopy study and to explore potential risk factors for its presence.
Patients had not been on treatment for dyspepsia for 2-4 weeks prior to endoscopy, which was performed within 10 working days of presentation.
Barrett's oesophagus was endoscopically suspected in 53 of 1040 cases (5%) and histologically confirmed by the presence of intestinal metaplasia in 25 (2.4%). The prevalence of biopsy-proven Barrett's oesophagus was 4% in patients with dominant reflux-like symptoms. Sixty-four percent with confirmed Barrett's oesophagus had dominant reflux-like symptoms compared with 37% without Barrett's oesophagus. Barrett's oesophagus was more common in patients >50 years of age; 68% of cases were males. The mean duration of symptoms was 10 years, yet 16% had symptoms of
PubMed ID
16480398 View in PubMed
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Prognosis for survival in neonatal meningitis: clinical and pathologic review of 52 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248949
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Jan 21;118(2):165-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-21-1978
Author
R. Bortolussi
C. Krishnan
D. Armstrong
P. Tovichayathamrong
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Jan 21;118(2):165-8
Date
Jan-21-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - pathology
Male
Meningitis - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - pathology
Ontario
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
A retrospective review of 52 cases of neonatal meningitis diagnosed and treated at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, was undertaken to determine which clinical or laboratory features were useful in predicting survival. Escherichia coli and group B streptococci were the most common bacteria isolated. Ventriculitis, cerebritis and arteritis were seen at autopsy with either gram-positive or gram-negative infection. Features associated with a good prognosis for survival were (a) peripheral neutrophil count greater than 2,000 x 10(9)/L; (b) normal platelet count or estimate (more than 100 x 10(9)/L), (c) birth weight greater than 2500 g and (d) age at the time of diagnosis more than 1 day. Information on all four features was available for 44 newborn infants. Of those with three or four of the features 87% survived, while of those with one or two features 14% survived. The overall mortality was 48%. The features outlined are useful in determining the severity of disease and therefore may alert the attending physician to the need for more intensive therapeutic and supportive care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
757384 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Psychiatr Assoc J. 1966 Apr;11(2):116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1966
Author
J D Armstrong
Source
Can Psychiatr Assoc J. 1966 Apr;11(2):116-22
Date
Apr-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Canada
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Psychology, Social
Substance-Related Disorders
PubMed ID
5946826 View in PubMed
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Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium haemophilum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7971
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Jul;32(7):1763-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
K. Kikuchi
E M Bernard
T E Kiehn
D. Armstrong
L W Riley
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Jul;32(7):1763-7
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - microbiology
Adult
Base Sequence
DNA Fingerprinting - methods
Female
Gene Library
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Mycobacterium haemophilum - genetics
Opportunistic Infections - microbiology
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Abstract
Mycobacterium haemophilum is an emerging opportunistic pathogen, and since 1989, infections caused by this organism have been identified more frequently in the New York City area than in any other region of the United States. A DNA fingerprinting method, based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was developed. A genomic library of M. haemophilum isolate 1A was constructed; screening the library yielded a recombinant strain that incorporated a genetic element present in multiple copies in the M. haemophilum genome. This clone was used to produce a probe for RFLP analyses of PvuII digests of genomic DNA. We used this probe to determine the RFLP patterns of 43 clinical isolates of M. haemophilum from 28 patients. A total of six distinct patterns were observed. Two patterns, designated types 1 and 2, accounted for 91% of the infections in patients from the New York City area. Two isolates from Arizona had identical patterns but were distinct from those of New York isolates, and an isolate from Israel, the type strain, had another distinct pattern (type 6). The type 6 pattern was also seen in a recent isolate from Norway. All of the type 1 isolates and 60% of the type 2 isolates were recovered from patients with AIDS in the New York City area. This molecular subtyping method should provide a useful tool for epidemiological studies and may help identify the associated risk factors, vehicles, and possible reservoirs of this newly emerging pathogen.
PubMed ID
7929771 View in PubMed
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Spatial trends and factors affecting variation of organochlorine contaminants levels in Canadian Arctic beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6619
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:344-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2005
Author
G A Stern
C R Macdonald
D. Armstrong
B. Dunn
C. Fuchs
L. Harwood
D C G Muir
B. Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Freshwater Institute, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, R3T 2N6. Sterng@dfo-mpo.gc.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:344-68
Date
Dec-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Animals
Arctic Regions
Beluga Whale
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Female
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Male
Pesticides - analysis
Principal Component Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs were analysed in blubber from beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), or white whales, collected at 15 sites in the Canadian Arctic between 1993 and 2001. The objective of the study was to define and interpret the spatial trends of major organic contaminants in northern beluga in terms of sources and transport pathways, and the biological factors influencing accumulation. When compared on a lipid weight basis, the concentrations of beta-HCH, cis-CHL and SigmaCHL, cis-nonachlor, heptachlor epoxide and p,p'-DDT were significantly higher in males than females at all five sites in the eastern Arctic where the two sexes were harvested. The differences were attributed to losses from the females during fetal development and lactation as reported in previous studies. Major compounds increased with age in males at most sites, however the lack of a significant increase with age at some sites was in part due to high organochlorine concentrations in young year classes (2-5 years), particularly at eastern sites such as Iqaluit and Pangnirtung. Lower concentrations of SigmaHCH and SigmaDDT compounds in young males in 2001 relative to 1995 at Hendrickson Island could be due to declining levels in the environment, changes in the diet, or differences in organochlorine loads transferred from the female after birth. Age-corrected least square mean concentrations in males showed significantly higher levels of many compounds, such as p,p'-DDE and SigmaCHB, at south Baffin Island sites than those in the west. Two notable exceptions were HCBz and beta-HCH which were higher in the west. Methoxyclor was detected in males at Sanikiluaq (58 ng g-1) and in both sexes at Kimmirut, but at no other sites. Principal component analysis grouped the 16 sites into five major groupings based on the similarity of normalised organochlorine pesticide and PCB levels. Sites from the western Arctic were grouped by higher proportions of HCBz, beta-HCH and gamma-HCH and higher chlorinated PCBs. Endosulfan and alpha-HCH comprised a larger proportion of total organochlorine residues in the northern Hudson Bay sites, while methoxychlor, chlordane compounds and octachlorobiphenyls were enriched at Sanikiluaq in eastern Hudson Bay. The analysis showed that the relative amounts of several key compounds are similar in the beluga stocks over large spatial areas (i.e. eastern versus western sites), however, some stocks have distinct fingerprints which can be used to differentiate them from adjacent stocks. Ratios of major HCH isomers largely corresponded with air and surface water measurements conducted during the 1990s, but low alpha-/beta- and alpha-/gamma-HCH ratios in all three western Arctic collections indicate rapid losses of the alpha-isomer from the food web, proportionately higher beta- and gamma-isomers in the Beaufort Sea, or a combination of the two processes. Chlordane residue patterns generally correspond to those from previous studies, however, interpretation of spatial trends are difficult due to the aging of the probable sources in the south, possible atmospheric input from new sources and complex transport pathways.
PubMed ID
16154619 View in PubMed
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Symptom overlap in patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints in the Canadian confirmatory acid suppression test (CAST) study: further psychometric validation of the reflux disease questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164113
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007 May 1;25(9):1087-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2007
Author
S V van Zanten
D. Armstrong
A. Barkun
O. Junghard
R J White
I K Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. vanzanten@ualberta.ca
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007 May 1;25(9):1087-97
Date
May-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Dyspepsia - drug therapy
Esomeprazole - therapeutic use
Gastric Acid - secretion
Gastroesophageal Reflux - drug therapy
Heartburn - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) is a short, patient-completed instrument.
To investigate the psychometric characteristics of the RDQ in patients with heartburn-predominant (HB) and non-heartburn predominant (NHB) dyspepsia.
HB (n = 388) and NHB (n = 733) patients were randomized to esomeprazole 40 mg daily or twice daily for 1 week, followed by 3 weeks of esomeprazole 40 mg daily.
High factor loadings (0.78-0.86) supported the 'regurgitation' dimension of the RDQ. Overlapping factor loadings in the 'heartburn' and 'dyspepsia' dimensions suggested symptom overlap. All dimensions demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: 0.79-0.90). Intra-class correlation coefficients over 4 weeks were good (0.66-0.85). The RDQ showed good responsiveness over 4 weeks of treatment, with high effect sizes (> or =0.80). Moderate or large symptom improvements were reported by 90% and 77% of HB and NHB patients, respectively, following treatment. Patients who responded to acid suppression also experienced symptom benefits in all RDQ dimensions.
The RDQ is reliable, valid and responsive to change in HB and NHB patients. The symptom overlap is important but need not play a major role in determining treatment strategy as both patient groups benefited from proton pump inhibitor treatment.
PubMed ID
17439510 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.