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Alcohol consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a cohort of Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212483
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Mar;7(2):214-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
S A Glynn
D. Albanes
P. Pietinen
C C Brown
M. Rautalahti
J A Tangrea
P R Taylor
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Mar;7(2):214-23
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Time Factors
beta Carotene
Abstract
We investigated the association between self-reported alcohol ingestion and colorectal cancer in a cohort of male smokers in Finland. Among 27,109 men aged 50 to 69 years, 87 colon and 53 rectal cases were diagnosed during the five to eight years of follow-up. Among drinkers, colorectal cancer risk increased with the amount of alcohol consumed (P trend = 0.01) with risk increasing by 17 percent for each drink consumed. Both beer and spirits contributed to this increased risk. Further analyses revealed that the positive association with alcohol was primarily for colon cancer (P trend = 0.01). Interestingly, risk of colorectal cancer associated with drinking (cf self-reported abstinence) changed with follow-up time, suggesting an inverse association for alcohol early in follow-up, and a positive association after about three-and-a-half years of follow-up. Follow-up time did not modify the positive association with amount of alcohol among drinkers, however. Results also indicated that beta-carotene supplementation may attenuate the effect of alcohol on colorectal cancer risk among drinkers. In conclusion, this study supports a role for alcohol in colon carcinogenesis and suggests that similar studies should evaluate carefully the effects of lifetime drinking habits and recent abstinence.
PubMed ID
8740734 View in PubMed
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Association between alcohol and lung cancer in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201116
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Jun;10(3):219-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
K. Woodson
D. Albanes
J A Tangrea
M. Rautalahti
J. Virtamo
P R Taylor
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Studies Branch, Division of Clinical Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-7058, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Jun;10(3):219-26
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene - therapeutic use
Abstract
We evaluated the association between alcohol intake and lung cancer in a trial-based cohort in Finland, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study).
During an average of 7.7 years of follow-up, 1059 lung cancer cases were diagnosed among the 27,111 male smokers with complete alcohol and dietary information. The relationship between alcohol and lung cancer was assessed in multivariate Cox regression models that adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index and intervention group.
Nondrinkers, 11% of the study population, were at increased lung cancer risk compared to drinkers (RR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.4), possibly due to the inclusion of ex-drinkers who had stopped drinking for health reasons. Among drinkers only, we observed no association between lung cancer and total ethanol or specific beverage (beer, wine, spirits) intake. We found no significant effect modification by level of smoking, dietary micronutrients or trial intervention group; however, for men in the highest quartile of alcohol intake, we observed a slight increase in risk for lighter smokers (30 cigarettes/day).
We concluded that alcohol consumption was not a risk factor for lung cancer among male cigarette smokers, and its effect was not significantly modified by other factors, notably smoking history.
PubMed ID
10454067 View in PubMed
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Association of 4p14 TLR locus with antibodies to Helicobacter pylori.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275606
Source
Genes Immun. 2015 Dec;16(8):567-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
H. Sung
M C Camargo
K. Yu
S J Weinstein
D R Morgan
D. Albanes
C S Rabkin
Source
Genes Immun. 2015 Dec;16(8):567-70
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - genetics - immunology
Finland
Genome-Wide Association Study
Helicobacter Infections - genetics - immunology
Helicobacter pylori - physiology
Humans
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Quantitative Trait Loci
Toll-Like Receptor 10 - genetics - immunology
Toll-Like Receptor 6 - genetics - immunology
Abstract
A genome-wide association study among Europeans related polymorphisms of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) locus at 4p14 and the Fc? receptor 2a locus at 1q23.3 to Helicobacter pylori serologic status. We replicated associations of 4p14 but not 1q23.3 with anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies in 1402 Finnish males. Importantly, our analysis clarified that the phenotype affected by 4p14 is quantitative level of these antibodies rather than association with seropositivity per se. In addition, we annotated variants at 4p14 as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) associated with TLR6/10 and FAM114A1. Our findings suggest that 4p14 polymorphisms are linked to host immune response to H. pylori infection but not to its acquisition.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26312625 View in PubMed
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Association of the B-vitamins pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (B(6)), B(12), and folate with lung cancer risk in older men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195150
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):688-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2001
Author
T J Hartman
K. Woodson
R. Stolzenberg-Solomon
J. Virtamo
J. Selhub
M J Barrett
D. Albanes
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):688-94
Date
Apr-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pyridoxine - administration & dosage - blood
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
A nested case-control study was conducted within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort to test for associations between selected B-vitamins (folate, vitamin B(6), vitamin B(12)) and incident lung cancer. This trial was conducted in Finland between 1985 and 1993. Serum was analyzed for these nutrients and homocysteine among 300 lung cancer cases and matched controls (1:1). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were determined in conditional and unconditional (controlling for the matching factors) logistic regression models, after adjusting for body mass index, years of smoking, and number of cigarettes smoked per day. No significant associations were seen between serum folate, vitamin B(12), or homocysteine and lung cancer risk. The authors found significantly lower risk of lung cancer among men who had higher serum vitamin B(6) levels. Compared with men with the lowest vitamin B(6) concentration, men in the fifth quintile had about one half of the risk of lung cancer (odds ratio = 0.51; 95% confidence interval: 0.23, 0.93; p-trend = 0.02). Adjusting for any of the other serum factors (folate, B(12), and homocysteine) either alone or jointly did not significantly alter these estimates. This is the first report from a prospectively conducted study to suggest a role for vitamin B(6) in lung cancer.
PubMed ID
11282797 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer and folate status: a nested case-control study among male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211579
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Jul;5(7):487-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
S A Glynn
D. Albanes
P. Pietinen
C C Brown
M. Rautalahti
J A Tangrea
E W Gunter
M J Barrett
J. Virtamo
P R Taylor
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Jul;5(7):487-94
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Folic Acid - blood
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
Evidence is accumulating that folate, a B vitamin found in green leafy vegetables, may affect the development of neoplasia. We examined the relationship between folate status and colorectal cancer in a case-control study nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Study cohort of male smokers 50-69 years old. Serum folate was measured in 144 incident cases (91 colon, 53 rectum) and 276 controls matched to cases on baseline age, clinic, and time of blood collection. Baseline dietary folate was available from a food-use questionnaire for 386 of these men (92%). Conditional logistic regression modeling was used. No statistically significant association was observed between serum folate and colon or rectal cancer. Although a 2-fold increase in rectal cancer risk was suggested for men with serum folate > 2.9 ng/ml and those in the highest quartile of energy-adjusted folate intake, there was no evidence of a monotonic dose-response, and all confidence intervals included unity. For dietary folate and colon cancer, odds ratios of 0.40 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16-0.96], 0.34 (95% CI, 0.13-0.88), and 0.51 (95% CI, 0.20-1.31) were obtained for the second through fourth quartiles of energy-adjusted folate intake, respectively, compared to the first (P for trend = 0.15). Furthermore, men with a high-alcohol, low-folate, low-protein diet were at higher risk for colon cancer than men who consumed a low-alcohol, high-folate, high-protein diet (OR, 4.79; 95% CI, 1.36-16.93). This study suggests a possible association between low folate intake and increased risk of colon cancer (but not rectal cancer) and highlights the need for further studies that measure dietary folate and methionine, along with biochemical measures of folate (i.e., erythrocyte and serum), homocysteine, and vitamin B12.
PubMed ID
8827351 View in PubMed
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Diet and prostate cancer risk in a cohort of smokers, with a specific focus on calcium and phosphorus (Finland).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196664
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):859-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
J M Chan
P. Pietinen
M. Virtanen
N. Malila
J. Tangrea
D. Albanes
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. jmlchan@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):859-67
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Calcium - metabolism
Calcium, dietary
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Proteins - metabolism
Double-Blind Method
Finland
Fructose - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphorus - metabolism
Phosphorus, Dietary
Prostatic Neoplasms - etiology - metabolism
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
Calcium, phosphorus, fructose, and animal protein are hypothesized to be associated with prostate cancer risk, potentially via their influence on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. We examined these nutrients and overall diet and prostate cancer risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study).
The ATBC Study was a randomized 2 x 2 trial of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene on lung cancer incidence conducted among Finnish male smokers; 27,062 of the men completed a food-use questionnaire at baseline, and comprise the current study population. There were 184 incident clinical (stage 2-4) prostate cancer cases diagnosed between 1985 and 1993. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine associations between dietary intakes and prostate cancer.
We did not observe significant independent associations for calcium and phosphorus and prostate cancer risk. However, men with lower calcium and higher phosphorus intake had a multivariate relative risk of 0.6 (95% CI 0.3-1.0) compared to men with lower intakes of both nutrients, adjusting for age, smoking, body mass index, total energy, education, and supplementation group. Of the other foods and nutrients examined, none was significantly associated with risk.
This study provides, at best, only weak evidence for the hypothesis that calcium and phosphorus are independently associated with prostate cancer risk, but suggests that there may be an interaction between these nutrients.
PubMed ID
11075876 View in PubMed
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Diet and risk of colorectal cancer in a cohort of Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200491
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Oct;10(5):387-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
P. Pietinen
N. Malila
M. Virtanen
T J Hartman
J A Tangrea
D. Albanes
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Oct;10(5):387-96
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Abstract
Based on previous epidemiological studies, high fat and meat consumption may increase and fiber, calcium, and vegetable consumption may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer. We sought to address these hypotheses in a male Finnish cohort.
We analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study) where 27, 111 male smokers completed a validated dietary questionnaire at baseline. After an average of 8 years of follow-up, we documented 185 cases of colorectal cancer. The analyses were carried out using the Cox proportional hazards model.
The relative risk (RR) for men in the highest quartile of calcium intake compared with men in the lowest quartile was 0.6 (95% CI 0.4-0.9, p for trend 0.04). Likewise, the intake of milk protein and the consumption of milk products was inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer. However, intake of dietary fiber was not associated with risk, nor was fat intake. Consumption of meat or different types of meat, and fried meat, fruits or vegetables were not associated with risk.
In this cohort of men consuming a diet high in fat, meat, and fiber and low in vegetables, high calcium intake was associated with lowered risk of colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
10530608 View in PubMed
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Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of cancer among Finnish male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140601
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Dec;21(12):2223-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
T. Hirvonen
J. Kontto
M. Jestoi
L. Valsta
K. Peltonen
P. Pietinen
S M Virtanen
H. Sinkko
C. Kronberg-Kippilä
D. Albanes
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Food Safety Authority, Risk Assessment Unit, Mustialankatu 3, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland. terohirvonen69@gmail.com
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Dec;21(12):2223-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Aged
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Placebos
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
To assess the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of cancer among male smokers.
The study consisted of 27,111 male smokers, aged 50-69 years, without history of cancer. They were participants of the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study in Finland. The men completed a validated dietary questionnaire and a questionnaire on general background characteristics (including smoking habits) at baseline. Incident cases of cancer were identified through the national Finnish Cancer Registry.
During an average 10.2 year follow-up, 1,703 lung cancers, 799 prostate cancers, 365 urothelial cancers, 316 colorectal cancers, 224 stomach cancers, 192 pancreatic cancers, 184 renal cell cancers, and 175 lymphomas were diagnosed. Dietary acrylamide intake was positively associated with the risk of lung cancer; relative risk (RR) in the highest versus the lowest quintile in the multivariable-adjusted model was 1.18 ((95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.38, p for trend 0.11). Other cancers were not associated with acrylamide intake.
High acrylamide intake is associated with increased risk of lung cancer but not with other cancers in male smokers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20859673 View in PubMed
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Dietary and other methyl-group availability factors and pancreatic cancer risk in a cohort of male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195151
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):680-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2001
Author
R Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
P. Pietinen
M J Barrett
P R Taylor
J. Virtamo
D. Albanes
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Studies Branch, Division of Clinical Science, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. rs221z@nih.gov
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):680-7
Date
Apr-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Probability
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Rate
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
The authors examined prospectively whether dietary folate and other factors known to influence methyl-group availability were associated with the development of exocrine pancreatic cancer within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort. Of the 27,101 healthy male smokers aged 50--69 years who completed a self-administered dietary questionnaire at baseline, 157 developed pancreatic cancer during up to 13 years of follow-up from 1985 to 1997. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The adjusted hazards ratio comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of dietary folate intake was 0.52 (95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.87; p-trend = 0.05). Dietary methionine, alcohol intake, and smoking history did not modify this relation. No significant associations were observed between dietary methionine, vitamins B(6) and B(12), or alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Consistent with prior studies, this study shows that cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk (highest compared with lowest quintile, cigarettes per day: hazards ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 3.03; p-trend = 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that dietary folate intake is inversely associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer and confirm the risk associated with greater cigarette smoking.
PubMed ID
11282796 View in PubMed
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Dietary antioxidants and the risk of lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225751
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1991
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
A. Rissanen
A. Aromaa
O P Heinonen
D. Albanes
M. Heinonen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Social Security, Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Date
Sep-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Carotenoids - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Eating
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retinoids - pharmacology
Risk
Selenium - pharmacology
Smoking
Vegetables
Vitamin E - pharmacology
Abstract
The relation between the intake of retinoids, carotenoids, vitamin E, vitamin C, and selenium and the subsequent risk of lung cancer was studied among 4,538 initially cancer-free Finnish men aged 20-69 years. During a follow-up of 20 years beginning in 1966-1972, 117 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. Inverse gradients were observed between the intake of carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C and the incidence of lung cancer among nonsmokers, for whom the age-adjusted relative risks of lung cancer in the lowest tertile of intake compared with that in the highest tertile were 2.5 (p value for trend = 0.04), 3.1 (p = 0.12), and 3.1 (p less than 0.01) for the three intakes, respectively. Adjustment for various potential confounding factors did not materially alter the results, and the associations did not seem to be due to preclinical cancer. In the total cohort, there was an inverse association between intake of margarine and fruits and risk of lung cancer. The relative risk of lung cancer for the lowest compared with the highest tertile of margarine intake was 4.0 (p less than 0.001), and that for fruits was 1.8 (p = 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for the micronutrient intakes and were stronger among nonsmokers. The results suggest that carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C may be protective against lung cancer among nonsmokers. Food sources rich in these micronutrients may also have other constituents with independent protective effects against lung cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 1;136(9):1167-9; author reply 1169-701462977
PubMed ID
1897503 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.