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Antidepressant use and colorectal cancer risk: a Danish population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140416
Source
Br J Cancer. 2011 Jan 4;104(1):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2011
Author
D P Cronin-Fenton
A H Riis
T L Lash
S O Dalton
S. Friis
D. Robertson
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. dc@dce.au.dk
Source
Br J Cancer. 2011 Jan 4;104(1):188-92
Date
Jan-4-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - chemically induced
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Earlier research suggests that use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but not tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC).
We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between antidepressant use and CRC risk. Cases were diagnosed with a first primary CRC from 1991 through 2008. We selected 10 population controls matched to cases on sex, birth year, and residence from the Danish Civil Registration System using risk-set sampling. We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associating antidepressant use with colorectal cancer occurrence, controlling for potential confounders.
The study included 9,979 cases and 99,790 controls. We found no notable reduction in CRC risk in ever users (=2 prescriptions) of TCAs (OR=0.94; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.05), SSRIs (OR=0.97; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.05), or other antidepressants (OR=0.95; 95% CI: 0.83, 1.07). Associations for recent and former use of antidepressants were also near null. Intensity of antidepressant use (number of pills divided by total duration of use), regardless of duration, was not associated with CRC risk.
We found no evidence that antidepressant use substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer.
Notes
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Erratum In: Br J Cancer. 2011 May 24;104(11):1804
PubMed ID
20877356 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity and survival of Danish breast cancer patients from 1995 to 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164299
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 May 7;96(9):1462-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-7-2007
Author
D P Cronin-Fenton
M. Nørgaard
J. Jacobsen
J P Garne
M. Ewertz
T L Lash
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Ole Worms Allé 1150, Aarhus C 8000, Denmark. dc@dce.au.dk
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 May 7;96(9):1462-8
Date
May-7-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Geography
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Registries
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Comorbid diseases can affect breast cancer prognosis. We conducted a population-based study of Danish women diagnosed with a first primary breast cancer from 1995 to 2005 (n=9300), using hospital discharge registry data to quantify comorbidities by Charlson score. We examined the influence of comorbidities on survival, and quantified their impact on relative mortality rates. The prevalence of patients with a Charlson score='0' fell from 86 to 81%, with an increase in those with Charlson score='1-2' from 13 to 16%, and score='3+' from 1 to 2%. One- and five-year survival for patients with Charlson score='0' and '1-2' was better for those diagnosed in 1998-2000 than in 1995-1997. Overall, patients diagnosed in 2001-2004 (mortality ratio (MR)=0.80, 95% CI=0.68-0.95) and 1998-2000 (MR=0.92, 95% CI=0.78-1.09) had lower 1-year age-adjusted mortality compared to those diagnosed in 1995-1997 (reference period). Patients with Charlson scores '1-2' and '3+' had higher age-adjusted 1-year mortality than those with a Charlson score='0' in each time period (2001-2004: MR('1-2')=1.76, 95% CI=1.35-2.30, and MR('3+')=3.78, 95% CI=2.51-5.68; and 1998-2000: MR('1-2')=1.60, 95% CI=1.36-1.88 and MR('3+')=2.34, 95% CI=1.65-3.33). Similar findings were observed for 5-year age-adjusted mortality. Additional analyses, adjusted for stage, indicated that confounding by stage could not explain these findings. Despite continued improvements in breast cancer survival, we found a trend of poorer survival among breast cancer patients with severe comorbidities even after adjusting for age and stage. Such poorer survival is an important public health concern and can be expected to worsen as the population ages.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17406360 View in PubMed
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Glucocorticoid prescriptions and breast cancer recurrence: a Danish nationwide prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264473
Source
Ann Oncol. 2014 Dec;25(12):2419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
L W Lietzen
T. Ahern
P. Christiansen
A B Jensen
H T Sørensen
T L Lash
D P Cronin-Fenton
Source
Ann Oncol. 2014 Dec;25(12):2419-25
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - pathology
Denmark
Female
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Abstract
Treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs) depresses the immune response and may therefore modify cancer outcomes. We investigated the association between GC use and breast cancer recurrence.
We conducted a population-based cohort study to examine the risk of breast cancer recurrence associated with GC use among incident stage I-III female breast cancer patients aged >18 years diagnosed 1996-2003 in Denmark. Data on patients, clinical and treatment factors, recurrence, and comorbidities as well as data on GC prescriptions and potential confounders were obtained from Danish population-based medical registries. GCs were categorized according to administrative route: systemic, inhaled, or intestinal. Women were followed for up to 10 years or until 31 December 2008. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to evaluate the association between GC use and recurrence. Time-varying drug exposures were lagged by 1 year.
We included 18 251 breast cancer patients. Median recurrence follow-up was 6.9 years; 3408 women developed recurrence during follow-up. Four thousand six hundred two women filled at least one GC prescription after diagnosis. In unadjusted models, no association was observed among users of systemic, inhaled, and intestinal GCs (HRsystemic = 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.3; HRinhaled = 0.9, 95% CI 0.7-1.0; and HRintestinal = 1.0, 95% CI 0.9-1.2) versus nonusers. In adjusted models, the results were also near null (HRsystemic = 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.2; HRinhaled = 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-1.0; and HRintestinal = 1.0, 95% CI 0.8-1.2).
We found no evidence of an effect of GC use on breast cancer recurrence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25223486 View in PubMed
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Hospitalisation for venous thromboembolism in cancer patients and the general population: a population-based cohort study in Denmark, 1997-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140796
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Sep 28;103(7):947-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2010
Author
D P Cronin-Fenton
F. Søndergaard
L A Pedersen
J P Fryzek
K. Cetin
J. Acquavella
J A Baron
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allè 43-45, Aarhus N 8200, Denmark. dc@dce.au.dk
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Sep 28;103(7):947-53
Date
Sep-28-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications
Population Surveillance
Risk assessment
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Abstract
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) frequently complicates cancer. Data on tumour-specific VTE predictors are limited, but may inform strategies to prevent thrombosis.
We computed incidence rates (IRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for VTE hospitalisation in a cohort of cancer patients (n=57,591) and in a comparison general-population cohort (n=287,476) in Denmark. The subjects entered the study in 1997-2005, and the follow-up continued through 2006. Using Cox proportional-hazards regression, we estimated relative risks (RRs) for VTE predictors, while adjusting for comorbidity.
Throughout the follow-up, VTE IR was higher among the cancer patients (IR=8.0, 95% CI=7.6-8.5) than the general population (IR=4.7, 95% CI=4.3-5.1), particularly in the first year after cancer diagnosis (IR=15.0, 95% CI=13.8-16.2, vs IR=8.6, 95% CI=7.6-9.9). Incidence rates of VTE were highest in patients with pancreas (IR=40.9, 95% CI=29.5-56.7), brain (IR=17.7, 95% CI=11.3-27.8) or liver (IR=20.4, 95% CI=9.2-45.3) tumours, multiple myeloma (IR=22.6, 95% CI=15.4-33.2) and among patients with advanced-stage cancers (IR=27.7, 95% CI=24.0-32.0) or those who received chemotherapy or no/symptomatic treatment. The adjusted RR (aRR) for VTE was highest among patients with pancreas (aRR=16.3, 95% CI=8.1-32.6) or brain cancer (aRR=19.8 95% CI=7.1-55.2), multiple myeloma (aRR=46.1, 95% CI=13.1-162.0) and among patients receiving chemotherapy, either alone (aRR=18.5, 95% CI=11.9-28.7) or in combination treatments (aRR=16.2, 95% CI=12.0-21.7).
Risk of VTE is higher among cancer patients than in the general population. Predictors of VTE include recency of cancer diagnosis, cancer site, stage and the type of cancer-directed treatment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20842120 View in PubMed
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Mortality and incidence of new primary cancers in men with prostate cancer: a Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112450
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2013 Oct;37(5):562-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
D P Cronin-Fenton
S. Antonsen
K. Cetin
A. Daniels
M. Borre
J. Acquavella
T L Lash
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. dc@dce.au.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2013 Oct;37(5):562-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Registries
Abstract
Prostate cancer (PC) survivors may have an increased risk of new primary cancers (NPCs) due to shared risk factors or PC-directed treatments.
Using Danish registries, we conducted a cohort study of men with (n=30,220) and without PC (n=151,100) (comparators), matched 1:5 on age and PC diagnosis/index date. We computed incidence rates of NPCs per 10,000 person years (PY) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI), and used Cox proportional hazards regression to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95%CI, adjusting for comorbidities. In order to obviate any impact of shorter survival among prostate cancer patients, we censored comparator patients when the matched prostate cancer patient died or was censored.
Follow-up spanned 113,487PY and 462,982PY in the PC and comparison cohorts, respectively. 65% of the cohorts were aged >70 years at diagnosis. Among PC patients, 51% had distant/unspecified stage, and 63% had surgery as primary treatment. The PC cohort had lower incidence of NPCs than their comparators. The adjusted HR of NPC among men with PC versus the comparators was 0.84 (95%CI=0.80, 0.88). Lowest HRs were among older men, those with distant stage, and were particularly evident for cancers of the brain, liver, pancreas, respiratory, upper gastrointestinal, and urinary systems.
We find no evidence of an increased risk of NPCs among men with PC. The deficit of NPCs among men with PC may be a true effect but is more likely due to lower levels of risk factors (e.g., smoking) in PC patients versus comparators, clinical consideration of cancers at new organs as metastases rather than new primaries, or under-recording/under-reporting of NPCs among PC patients.
PubMed ID
23830884 View in PubMed
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