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12 records – page 1 of 2.

An evaluation of airborne nickel, zinc, and lead exposure at hot dip galvanizing plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225322
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1991 Dec;52(12):511-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
D K Verma
D S Shaw
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1991 Dec;52(12):511-5
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Lead - analysis
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Metallurgy
Nickel - analysis
Ontario
Protective Devices
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
Industrial hygiene surveys were conducted at three hot dip galvanizing plants to determine occupational exposure to nickel, zinc, and lead. All three plants employed the "dry process" and used 2% nickel, by weight, in their zinc baths. A total of 32 personal and area air samples were taken. The air samples were analyzed for nickel, zinc, and lead. Some samples were also analyzed for various species of nickel (i.e., metallic, soluble, and oxidic). The airborne concentrations observed for nickel and its three species, zinc, and lead at the three plants were all well below the current and proposed threshold limit values recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).
PubMed ID
1781430 View in PubMed
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Assessment of triethylamine and diethylamine emission from military gas mask canisters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204659
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1998 Jul;42(5):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
D K Verma
J G Pagotto
D S Shaw
K. Destombe
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1998 Jul;42(5):325-30
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diethylamines
Ethylamines
Filtration
Humans
Military Medicine
Occupational Exposure
Respiratory Protective Devices
Abstract
A study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of four types of amine modified charcoal filter canisters (cartridge) for use with gas masks (respirators) by measuring emissions of triethylamine (TEA) and diethylamine (DEA). Sampling and analysis methods for TEA and DEA were validated and optimized to ensure accurate measurement at low levels. A total of 88 air samples were taken by the validated methods to measure concentrations of TEA and DEA emitted from gas mask canisters during simulated use in an environmental chamber. Samples were collected on a mannequin equipped with a breather pump and also on human volunteers. Very low levels of TEA and moderately low levels of DEA emissions were measured during the simulations. The C7 (KOH-TEA-BPL/ASC3T) gas mask canister giving the lowest emission has been selected for use by the Canadian Forces. The potential health hazard from TEA and DEA for soldiers using the gas masks, under normal conditions, based on estimated use of one to two days per month, for a maximum of 4 hours/day for a normal working lifetime, was considered to be minimal and acceptable.
PubMed ID
9729920 View in PubMed
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Benzene and total hydrocarbon exposures in the upstream petroleum oil and gas industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198791
Source
AIHAJ. 2000 Mar-Apr;61(2):255-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
D K Verma
D M Johnson
J D McLean
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
AIHAJ. 2000 Mar-Apr;61(2):255-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzene - adverse effects - analysis
Canada
Extraction and Processing Industry
Humans
Hydrocarbons - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Petroleum
Abstract
Occupational exposures to benzene and total hydrocarbons (THC) in the Canadian upstream petroleum industry are described in this article. A total of 1547 air samples taken by 5 oil companies in various sectors (i.e., conventional oil/gas, conventional gas, heavy oil processing, drilling and pipelines) were evaluated and summarized. The data includes personal long- and short-term samples and area long-term samples. The percentage of samples over the occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 3.2 mg/m3 or one part per million for benzene, for personal long-term samples ranges from 0 to 0.7% in the different sectors, and area long-term samples range from 0 to 13%. For short-term personal samples, the exceedance for benzene is at 5% with respect to the OEL of 16 mg/m3 or five parts per million in the conventional gas sector and none in the remaining sectors. THC levels were not available for all sectors and had limited data points in others. The percentage exceedance of the OEL of 280 mg/m3 or 100 parts per million for THC as gasoline ranged from 0 to 2.6% for personal long-term samples. It is recommended that certain operations such as glycol dehydrators be carefully monitored and that a task-based monitoring program be included along with the traditional long- and short-term personal exposure sampling.
PubMed ID
10782197 View in PubMed
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Cancer morbidity in lamp manufacturing workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234040
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1988;14(3):281-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
H S Shannon
T. Haines
C. Bernholz
J A Julian
D K Verma
E. Jamieson
C. Walsh
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1988;14(3):281-90
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Canada
Female
Humans
Industry
Lighting
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
A historical prospective study of cancer in lamp manufacturing workers in one plant was conducted. All men and women who worked for a total of at least 6 months and were employed at some time between 1960 and 1975 were included. Work histories were abstracted and subjects were divided according to whether they had worked in the coiling and wire drawing area (CWD). Cancer morbidity from 1964 to 1982 was ascertained via the provincial registry, and was compared with the site-specific incidence in Ontario, adjusting for age, sex and calendar period. Of particular interest were primary breast and gynecological cancers in women. The cancers of a priori concern were significantly increased in women in CWD, but not elsewhere in the plant. The excess was greatest in those with more than 5 yr exposure (in CWD) and more than 15 yr since first working in CWD, with eight cases of breast and gynecological cancers observed in this category compared with 2.67 expected. Only three cancers occurred in men in CWD. Environmental measurements had not been made in the past and little information was available on substances used in the 1940s and 1950s, the period when the women with the highest excess began employment. It is known that methylene chloride and trichlorethylene have been used, but not enough is known about the dates and patterns of use to draw any conclusions about their relationship with the increase in disease.
PubMed ID
3189346 View in PubMed
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A cohort study of mortality among Ontario pipe trades workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178773
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Sep;61(9):736-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
M M Finkelstein
D K Verma
Author Affiliation
Program in Occupational Health and Environmental Medicine, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5. murray.finkelstein@utoronto.ca
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Sep;61(9):736-42
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
To study mortality in a cohort of members of the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada and to compare results with two previous proportional mortality studies.
A cohort of 25,285 workers who entered the trade after 1949 was assembled from records of the international head office. Mortality was ascertained by linkage to the Canadian Mortality Registry at Statistics Canada. Standardised mortality ratios were computed using Ontario general population mortality rates as the reference.
There were significant increases in lung cancer mortality rates (SMR 1.27; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.42). Increased lung cancer risk was observed among plumbers, pipefitters, and sprinkler fitters. Increased risk was observed among workers joining the Union as late as the 1970s. A random effects meta-analysis of this study and the two PMR studies found significant increases in oesophageal (RR 1.24; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.53), lung (RR 1.31; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.44), and haematological/lymphatic (RR 1.21; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.35) malignancies.
The mortality pattern is consistent with the effects of occupational exposure to asbestos. Increased risk due to other respiratory carcinogens such as welding fume cannot be excluded. There are substantial amounts of asbestos in place in industrial and commercial environments. The education and training of workers to protect themselves against inhalation hazards will be necessary well into the future.
Notes
Cites: J Occup Med. 1980 Mar;22(3):183-97365557
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1982 Jan-Feb;73(1):39-467074517
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Mar;15(1):134-73754239
Cites: J Occup Med. 1994 May;36(5):516-258027876
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1986;10(1):73-893740068
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1989 Jan-Feb;80(1):54-72702547
Cites: Stat Med. 1986 Jan-Feb;5(1):61-713961316
PubMed ID
15317913 View in PubMed
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A comparison of international silica (alpha-quartz) calibration standards by Fourier transform-infrared spectrophotometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193614
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Aug;45(6):429-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
D K Verma
D S Shaw
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5, Canada. vermadk@mcmaster.ca
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Aug;45(6):429-35
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration - standards
Canada
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Europe
Humans
Particle Size
Quartz - analysis - standards
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
United States
Abstract
Seven international silica (alpha-quartz) standards were examined for relative purity to the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1878 Respirable alpha-quartz by Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectrophotometry (FT-IR). The standards examined have been used in North America, the UK, Australia and Germany. The 189 samples analyzed included NIST-SRM 1878, Min-U-Sil 5, Ottawa Silica Sand, Sikron F-600, A9950 (AUST 1), DQ12-Robock, DQ12-Bergbau. Size distributions of the standards were determined by Coulter Counter to be broadly similar with equivalent spherical volume median diameter ranging between 1.2 and 3 microm. The results showed the standards to differ by as much as 30% in relative purity. Consequently, an internationally agreed upon calibration standard is urgently needed. Min-U-Sil 5 based NIST-SRM 1878 or Sikron F-600 are the two most likely candidates. Any agreed standard must have a well characterized size distribution and closely match the respirable dust criteria. It should also be studied by both infrared spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction techniques.
PubMed ID
11513792 View in PubMed
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Hydrocarbon exposures at petroleum bulk terminals and agencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222964
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1992 Oct;53(10):645-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
D K Verma
J A Julian
G. Bebee
W K Cheng
K. Holborn
L. Shaw
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1992 Oct;53(10):645-56
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Hydrocarbons - adverse effects - analysis
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Ontario
Petroleum - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
Occupational exposures to the 55 hydrocarbon components of gasoline and petroleum products were measured at the bulk terminals and agencies of six Ontario petroleum companies during the summer of 1986. A total of 82 long-term (full-shift) and 111 short-term personal samples were taken over 3 months. The data, expressed as concentrations in milligrams per cubic meter, were highly variable and appeared to fit the lognormal distribution well. Full-shift exposures of bulk terminal drivers, agency drivers, and plantmen to total hydrocarbons (THC), computed as an n-hexane equivalent, and other hydrocarbon components for which exposure limits exist can be expected to exceed their respective 1986-1987 threshold limit value-time-weighted average (TLV-TWA) no greater than 1% of the time on the basis of the lognormal model. The short-term THC exposures of agency truck drivers can be expected to exceed the 1986-1987 TLV-short-term exposure limits about 7% of the time while top-loading and more than 17% while off-loading. For benzene, the short-term exceedance percentages are 1% and 4% for top- and off-loading operations, respectively. For long-term benzene exposures, up to 69% of the assessments can be expected to exceed the 1990-1991 proposed TLV-TWA of 0.3 mg/m3 (0.1 ppm). The full-shift hydrocarbon exposures of agency drivers were significantly higher than those for bulk terminal drivers. At the bulk terminals, the short-term hydrocarbon exposures during top-loading were significantly higher than during bottom-loading.
PubMed ID
1456207 View in PubMed
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Occupational exposure to asbestos in the drywall taping process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245869
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1980 Apr;41(4):264-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980
Author
D K Verma
C G Middleton
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1980 Apr;41(4):264-9
Date
Apr-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Asbestos - analysis
Canada
Construction Materials
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - prevention & control
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Smoking
Abstract
Studies of airborne asbestos fiber concentrations associated with various operations of the drywall taping process have been undertaken in the province of Alberta, Canada. The results show that mixing, sanding and sweeping created high levels of airborne asbestos dust. The measured concentrations were frequently in excess of occupational health standards. Sanding in particular was assessed the most hazardous operation. The results are discussed in light of present and proposed Occupational Health Standards, and in terms of its implications for other workers, household contacts, and consumer's risk. Measures to reduce and control the health hazards associated with the process are described.
PubMed ID
7395743 View in PubMed
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Silica exposure and silicosis among Ontario hardrock miners: II. Exposure estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231559
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):13-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D K Verma
A. Sebestyen
J A Julian
D C Muir
H. Schmidt
C D Bernholz
H S Shannon
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):13-8
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Mining
Ontario
Silicosis - epidemiology
Abstract
An epidemiological investigation was carried out to determine the relationship between silicosis in hardrock miners in Ontario and cumulative exposure to silica (free crystalline silica--alpha quartz) dust. This second report describes a side-by-side air-sampling program used to derive a konimeter/gravimetric silica conversion curve. A total of 2,360 filter samples and 90,000 konimeter samples were taken over 2 years in two mines representing the ore types gold and uranium, both in existing conditions as well as in an experimental stope in which dry drilling was used to simulate the high dust conditions of the past. The method of calculating cumulative respirable silica exposure indices for each miner is reported.
PubMed ID
2750747 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.