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Arctic indigenous women consume greater than acceptable levels of organochlorines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4881
Source
J Nutr. 1995 Oct;125(10):2501-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
H V Kuhnlein
O. Receveur
D C Muir
H M Chan
R. Soueida
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec.
Source
J Nutr. 1995 Oct;125(10):2501-10
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Chlorobenzenes - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Comparative Study
Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Dieldrin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Diet - standards
Environmental Exposure
Ethnic Groups
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Insecticides - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Interviews
Lindane - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Meat - analysis
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seals, Earless
Toxaphene - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides through traditional food resources was examined for Arctic Indigenous women living in two cultural and environmental areas of the Canadian Arctic--one community representing Baffin Island Inuit in eastern Arctic and two communities representing Sahtú Dene/Métis in western Arctic. Polychlorinated biphenyls, toxaphene, chlorobenzenes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, chlordane-related compounds and dieldrin were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by women in three age groups: 20-40 y, 41-60 y and > or = 61 y. There was wide variation of intake of all organochlorine contaminants in both areas and among age groups for the Sahtú. Fifty percent of the intake recalls collected from the Baffin Inuit exceeded the acceptable daily intake for chlordane-related compounds and toxaphene, and a substantial percentage of the intake records for dieldrin and polychlorinated biphenyls exceeded the acceptable or tolerable daily intake levels. Primary contributing foods to organochlorine contaminants intake for the Baffin Inuit were meat and blubber of ringed seal, blubber of walrus and mattak and blubber of narwal. Important foods contributing organochlorine contaminant to the Sahtú Dene/Métis were caribou, whitefish, inconnu, trout and duck. The superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items are reviewed, as are implications for monitoring organochlorine contaminant contents of food, clinical symptoms and food use.
PubMed ID
7562084 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality associated with the high-temperature oxidation of nickel subsulfide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241118
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1984;(53):23-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
R S Roberts
J A Julian
D C Muir
H S Shannon
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1984;(53):23-35
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Abstract
An historical prospective mortality study of INCO's Ontario work-force has been conducted. A cohort of approximately 54 000 men, employed in all aspects of the extraction and refining of copper and nickel from the Sudbury ore deposit, have been followed for mortality between 1950 and 1976. A total of 5 283 deaths were identified by computerized record-linkage to the Canadian Mortality Data Base of death certificates. The analysis focuses on mortality from cancer of the nasal sinuses, larynx, lung, and kidney. Little evidence was found for increased mortality from laryngeal or kidney cancer, but lung and nasal cancer deaths were clearly elevated in men exposed to the two Sudbury area sinter plants and at Port Colborne in the leaching, calcining, and sintering department. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lung cancer increases linearly with increasing duration of exposure and there is no evidence of a threshold. The nasal cancer mortality rate also rises linearly with duration of exposure. While lung cancer has a greater excess in the Sudbury sinter plant than at Port Colborne, the reverse is true for mortality from nasal cancer, which is ten times more frequent at Port Colborne than at Sudbury.
PubMed ID
6532983 View in PubMed
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Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in arctic marine mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6869
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 Sep 16;154(2-3):107-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-16-1994
Author
R J Norstrom
D C Muir
Author Affiliation
Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, Hull, Québec.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 Sep 16;154(2-3):107-28
Date
Sep-16-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biological Transport, Active
Comparative Study
Ecosystem
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Male
Mammals - metabolism
Marine Biology
Abstract
By 1976, the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) had been demonstrated in fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), walrus (Obdobenus rosmarus divergens), beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in various parts of the Arctic. In spite of this early interest, very little subsequent research on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals was undertaken until the mid-1980s. Since that time, there has been an explosion of interest, resulting in a much expanded data base on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals. Except in the Russian Arctic, data have now been obtained on the temporospatial distribution of PCBs and other contaminants in ringed seal, beluga and polar bear. Contaminants in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) have also now been measured. On a fat weight basis, the sum of DDT-related compounds (S-DDT) and PCB levels are lowest in walrus (
PubMed ID
7973601 View in PubMed
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Classification of chest radiographs for pneumoconiosis: a comparison of two methods of reading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222647
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1992 Dec;49(12):869-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
D C Muir
C D Bernholz
W K Morgan
J O Roos
J. Chan
W. Maehle
J A Julian
A. Sebestyen
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1992 Dec;49(12):869-71
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Lung - pathology - radiography
Mining
Observer Variation
Ontario - epidemiology
Pneumoconiosis - epidemiology - pathology - radiography
Technology, Radiologic - methods
Notes
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):5-112750750
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1988;41(10):949-583057117
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Aug;126(2):161-93300279
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1951 Jul;8(3):138-4914858773
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 1982;26(1-4):401-96295243
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1960 Oct;17:279-9213698433
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1966 Mar;12(3):314-305904510
PubMed ID
1472446 View in PubMed
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Classification of radiographs for pneumoconiosis: the Canadian Pneumoconiosis Reading Panel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220629
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1993 Aug;24(2):139-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
D C Muir
J A Julian
J O Roos
W M Maehle
J. Chan
W. Mountain
W K Morgan
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Occupational Health Program, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1993 Aug;24(2):139-47
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Clinical Competence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Occupational Medicine - education
Pneumoconiosis - radiography
Radiography - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A method of providing experience for readers in the classification of radiographs for pneumoconiosis is described. It is based on an exchange of films by mail, with provision for ongoing feedback of results. The effects of this feedback on reading levels is described. The method is suitable for readers who are unable to attend major centers for formal instruction, and has the additional advantage of continual monitoring of reading levels.
PubMed ID
8213842 View in PubMed
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Contaminants in the Canadian Arctic: 5 years of progress in understanding sources, occurrence and pathways.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197975
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 1;254(2-3):93-234
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2000
Author
R W Macdonal
L A Barrie
T F Bidleman
M L Diamond
D J Gregor
R G Semkin
W M Strachan
Y F Li
F. Wania
M. Alaee
L B Alexeeva
S M Backus
R. Bailey
J M Bewers
C. Gobeil
C J Halsall
T. Harner
J T Hoff
L M Jantunen
W L Lockhart
D. Mackay
D C Muir
J. Pudykiewicz
K J Reimer
J N Smith
G A Stern
Author Affiliation
Institute of Ocean Sciences, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Sidney, BC, Canada. macdonaldrob@dfo-mpo.gc.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 1;254(2-3):93-234
Date
Jun-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Ecosystem
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Environmental pollution
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Pesticides - analysis
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis
Radioisotopes - analysis
Abstract
Recent studies of contaminants under the Canadian Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) have substantially enhanced our understanding of the pathways by which contaminants enter Canada's Arctic and move through terrestrial and marine ecosystems there. Building on a previous review (Barrie et al., Arctic contaminants: sources, occurrence and pathways. Sci Total Environ 1992:1-74), we highlight new knowledge developed under the NCP on the sources, occurrence and pathways of contaminants (organochlorines, Hg, Pb and Cd, PAHs, artificial radionuclides). Starting from the global scale, we examine emission histories and sources for selected contaminants focussing especially on the organochlorines. Physical and chemical properties, transport processes in the environment (e.g. winds, currents, partitioning), and models are then used to identify, understand and illustrate the connection between the contaminant sources in industrial and agricultural regions to the south and the eventual arrival of contaminants in remote regions of the Arctic. Within the Arctic, we examine how contaminants impinge on marine and terrestrial pathways and how they are subsequently either removed to sinks or remain where they can enter the biosphere. As a way to focus this synthesis on key concerns of northern residents, a number of special topics are examined including: a mass balance for HCH and toxaphene (CHBs) in the Arctic Ocean; a comparison of PCB sources within Canada's Arctic (Dew Line Sites) with PCBs imported through long-range transport; an evaluation of concerns posed by three priority metals--Hg, Pb and Cd; an evaluation of the risks from artificial radionuclides in the ocean; a review of what is known about new-generation pesticides that are replacing the organochlorines; and a comparison of natural vs. anthropogenic sources of PAH in the Arctic. The research and syntheses provide compelling evidence for close connectivity between the global emission of contaminants from industrial and agricultural activities and the Arctic. For semi-volatile compounds that partition strongly into cold water (e.g. HCH) we have seen an inevitable loading of Arctic aquatic reservoirs. Drastic HCH emission reductions have been rapidly followed by reduced atmospheric burdens with the result that the major reservoir and transport agent has become the ocean. In the Arctic, it will take decades for the upper ocean to clear itself of HCH. For compounds that partition strongly onto particles, and for which the soil reservoir is most important (e.g. PCBs), we have seen a delay in their arrival in the Arctic and some fractionation toward more volatile compounds (e.g. lower-chlorinated PCBs). Despite banning the production of PCB in the 1970s, and despite decreases of PCBs in environmental compartments in temperate regions, the Arctic presently shows little evidence of reduced PCB loadings. We anticipate a delay in PCB reductions in the Arctic and environmental lifetimes measured in decades. Although artificial radionuclides have caused great concern due to their direct disposal on Russian Shelves, they are found to pose little threat to Canadian waters and, indeed, much of the radionuclide inventory can be explained as remnant global fallout, which was sharply curtailed in the 1960s, and waste emissions released under license by the European reprocessing plants. Although Cd poses a human dietary concern both for terrestrial and marine mammals, we find little evidence that Cd in marine systems has been impacted by human activities. There is evidence of contaminant Pb in the Arctic, but loadings appear presently to be decreasing due to source controls (e.g. removal of Pb from gasoline) in Europe and North America. Of the metals, Hg provokes the greatest concern; loadings appear to be increasing in the Arctic due to global human activities, but such loadings are not evenly distributed nor are the pathways by which they enter and move within the Arctic well understood.
PubMed ID
10885446 View in PubMed
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Contaminants in the Greenland environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199462
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jan 17;245(1-3):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2000
Author
P. Johansen
D C Muir
R J Law
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Arctic Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jan 17;245(1-3):1-2
Date
Jan-17-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Greenland
Humans
Public Health
PubMed ID
10682351 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1189; author reply 1191-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2001
Author
D C Muir
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1189; author reply 1191-3
Date
Oct-30-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos
Canada
Commerce
Ethics
Humans
Safety
World Health
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):495-711233870
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):489-9011233868
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):491-411233869
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):489-9011233868
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):491-411233869
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):495-711233870
PubMed ID
11706901 View in PubMed
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Geographical variation of persistent organochlorine concentrations in blubber of ringed seal (Phoca hispida) from the Canadian Arctic: univariate and multivariate approaches.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6831
Source
Environ Pollut. 1997;96(3):321-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
I M Weis
D C Muir
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences and Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada.
Source
Environ Pollut. 1997;96(3):321-33
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Geographical variation of organochlorine (OC) concentrations in ringed seal (Phoca hispida) in the Canadian Arctic was studied using univariate and multivariate statistical techniques. The dataset consisted of 80 individual OC components (58 PCB congeners plus DDT- and chlordane (CHL)-related compounds, toxaphene, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), chlorobenzenes (CBz), and dieldrin) determined in 221 ringed seal blubber samples from 13 locations throughout the Canadian Arctic from the period 1983 to 1989. Mean concentrations of the major OC groups in ringed seal blubber (SigmaPCBs, SigmaDDT, SigmaCHL and toxaphene), adjusted for the age and sex of the seals, showed few significant geographical differences. Principal components analysis was used to examine geographical trends. Significant differences in mean factor scores for three of four principal components were found between sampling locations. Locations in the western and high Arctic could be distinguished from those in Hudson Bay by highest scores along principal component two which was associated principally with CBz. PCB congeners with six or more chlorine substitutions declined with increasing north latitude, whereas more volatile OCs (CBz, HCH, less chlorinated PCBs) increased in the proportion of total OCs with latitude. Proportions of less chlorinated PCBs also decreased with increasing longitude, whereas slopes of regressions for more highly chlorinated PCBs increased significantly. The results were generally consistent with the 'cold condensation' hypothesis of increasing proportions of more volatile OCs with increasing latitude and distance from sources.
PubMed ID
15093398 View in PubMed
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Inuit exposure to organochlorines through the aquatic food chain in arctic qu├ębec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4896
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Dec;101(7):618-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
E. Dewailly
P. Ayotte
S. Bruneau
C. Laliberté
D C Muir
R J Norstrom
Author Affiliation
Public Health Center, Laval University Hospital, Ste-Foy, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Dec;101(7):618-20
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Body Burden
Diet
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Information Systems
Insecticides
Inuits
Milk, human - chemistry
Quebec
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seafood
Abstract
Inuit people (Eskimos) are likely exposed to persistent organochlorine compounds because their traditional diet includes fatty tissues of the arctic marine biota. Here we present the results of organochlorine compound analysis in milk fat samples from arctic Québec Inuit women and in fat tissues from various animal species inhabiting that region. The total concentration of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in Inuit milk fat was similar to that of the beluga, while the profile of the 10 congeners resembled that of the polar bear. Mean concentrations of various organochlorines in milk-fat samples from Inuit women were between 2 and 10 times greater than those found in samples previously collected from southern Québec women. The Inuit mothers exhibit the greatest body burden known to occur from exposure to organochlorine residues present in the environment by virtue of their location at the highest trophic level of the arctic food web.
PubMed ID
8143594 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.