Skip header and navigation

Refine By

15 records – page 1 of 2.

Bioaccumulation of organochlorine contaminants in bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) from Barrow, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6727
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2002 May;42(4):497-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
P F Hoekstra
T M O'Hara
S J Pallant
K R Solomon
D C G Muir
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Biology, University of Guelph, ON, Canada. paul.hoekstra@ec.gc.ca
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2002 May;42(4):497-507
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Alaska
Animals
Female
Food chain
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - pharmacokinetics
Liver - chemistry
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical - pharmacokinetics
Whales - metabolism
Abstract
Bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) blubber (n = 72) and liver (n = 23) samples were collected during seven consecutive subsistence harvests (1997-2000) at Barrow, Alaska, to investigate the bioaccumulation of organochlorine contaminants (OCs) by this long-lived mysticete. The rank order of OC group concentrations (geometric mean, wet weight) in bowhead blubber samples were toxaphene (TOX; 455 ng/g) > polychlorinated biphenyls (SigmaPCBs; 410 ng/g) > dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane-related compounds (SigmaDDT; 331 ng/g) >or= hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (SigmaHCHs; 203 ng/g) >or= chlordanes and related isomers (SigmaCHLOR; 183 ng/g) > chlorobenzenes (SigmaCIBz; 106 ng/g). In liver, SigmaHCH (9.5 ng/g; wet weight) was the most abundant SigmaOC group, followed by SigmaPCBs (9.1 ng/g) >or= TOX (8.8 ng/g) > SigmaCHLOR (5.5 ng/g) > SigmaCIBz (4.2 ng/g) >or= SigmaDDT (3.7 ng/g). The dominant analyte in blubber and liver was p,p'-DDE and alpha-HCH, respectively. Total TOX, SigmaPCBs, SigmaDDT, and SigmaCHLOR concentrations in blubber generally increased with age of male whales (as interpreted by body length), but this relationship was not significant for adult female whales. Biomagnification factor (BMF) values (0.1-45.5) for OCs from zooplankton (Calanus sp.) to bowhead whale were consistent with findings for other mysticetes. Tissue-specific differences in OC patterns in blubber and liver may be attributed to variation of tissue composition and the relatively low capacity of this species to biotransform various OCs. Principal component analysis of contaminants levels in bowhead blubber samples suggest that proportions of OCs, such as beta-HCH, fluctuate with seasonal migration of this species between the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas.
PubMed ID
11994792 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cadmium and other elements in tissues from four ungulate species from the Mackenzie Mountain region of the Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273318
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2016 May 27;132:9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2016
Author
N C Larter
C R Macdonald
B T Elkin
X. Wang
N J Harms
M. Gamberg
D C G Muir
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2016 May 27;132:9-17
Date
May-27-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Tissue samples from four ungulate species from the south Mackenzie Mountain region of the Northwest Territories (NT), Canada, were analysed for stable and radioactive elements and (15)N and (13)C stable isotopes. Elevated Cd concentrations in moose (Alces americanus) kidney have been observed in the region and are a health care concern for consumers of traditional foods. This study examined the factors associated with, and potential renal effects from, the accumulation of cadmium, and interactions with other elements in four sympatric ungulate species. Mean renal Cd concentration was highest in moose (48.3mg/kg ww), followed by mountain caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) (13.9mg/kg ww) and mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) (5.78mg/kg ww). No local sources of Cd were evident and the elevated levels in moose are considered to be natural in origin. Conversely, total Hg concentration was significantly higher in mountain caribou kidney (0.21mg/kg ww) than in moose (0.011mg/kg ww). (134)Cs (t½=2.1 y) in mountain goat and Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli) muscle is evidence of deposition from the Fukushima reactor accident in 2011. (137)Cs (t½=30.2 y) in all four ungulates is primarily a remnant of the nuclear weapons tests of the 1960s. The levels of both nuclides are low and the risk to the animals and people consuming them is negligible. Stable isotope d(15)N and d(13)C signatures in muscle showed a separation between the mountain caribou, with a lichen-dominated diet, and moose, which browse shrubs and forbs. Isotope signatures for mountain goat and Dall's sheep showed generalist feeding patterns. Differences in elemental and radionuclide levels between species were attributed to relative levels of metal accumulation in the different food items in the diets of the respective species. Kidneys from each species showed minor histological changes in the proximal tubule and glomerulus, although glomerular changes were rare and all changes were rare in mountain goat kidney. Kidney function was not expected to be affected in any species. Provisional Monthly Intake recommendations from the WHO indicate that Cd in moose organs will continue to be a public health care concern. However, traditional foods continue to be an important nutritional component of northern diets, particularly in consideration of the shift towards store-bought food.
PubMed ID
27240258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate and permafrost effects on the chemistry and ecosystems of High Arctic Lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286487
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 16;7(1):13292
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-2017
Author
K E Roberts
S F Lamoureux
T K Kyser
D C G Muir
M J Lafrenière
D. Iqaluk
A J Pienkowski
A. Normandeau
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 16;7(1):13292
Date
Oct-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Permafrost exerts an important control over hydrological processes in Arctic landscapes and lakes. Recent warming and summer precipitation has the potential to alter water availability and quality in this environment through thermal perturbation of near surface permafrost and increased mobility of previously frozen solutes to Arctic freshwaters. We present a unique thirteen-year record (2003-16) of the physiochemical properties of two High Arctic lakes and show that the concentration of major ions, especially SO4(2-), has rapidly increased up to 500% since 2008. This hydrochemical change has occurred synchronously in both lakes and ionic ratio changes in the lakes indicate that the source for the SO4(2-) is compositionally similar to terrestrial sources arising from permafrost thaw. Record summer temperatures during this period (2003-16) following over 100 years of warming and summer precipitation in this polar desert environment provide likely mechanisms for this rapid chemical change. An abrupt limnological change is also reflected in the otolith chemistry and improved relative condition of resident Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and increased diatom diversity point to a positive ecosystem response during the same period.
Notes
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Mar 24;112(12):3636-4025775530
Cites: Ambio. 2006 Jun;35(4):160-816944640
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Jul 24;104(30):12395-717606917
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Mar 22;102(12):4397-40215738395
Cites: Science. 2009 Sep 4;325(5945):1236-919729653
PubMed ID
29038475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of mercury concentrations in landlocked, resident, and sea-run fish (Salvelinus spp.) from Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101809
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2011 Jun;30(6):1459-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Heidi Swanson
Nikolaus Gantner
Karen A Kidd
D C G Muir
James D Reist
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute and Biology Department, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. heidikswanson@yahoo.ca
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2011 Jun;30(6):1459-67
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Chlorophyll - analysis
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Fresh Water - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis - metabolism
Nunavut
Seafood - statistics & numerical data
Seawater - chemistry
Trout - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Mercury concentrations ([Hg]) in Arctic food fish often exceed guidelines for human subsistence consumption. Previous research on two food fish species, Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), indicates that anadromous fish have lower [Hg] than nonanadromous fish, but there have been no intraregional comparisons. Also, no comparisons of [Hg] among anadromous (sea-run), resident (marine access but do not migrate), and landlocked (no marine access) life history types of Arctic char and lake trout have been published. Using intraregional data from 10 lakes in the West Kitikmeot area of Nunavut, Canada, we found that [Hg] varied significantly among species and life history types. Differences among species-life history types were best explained by age-at-size and C:N ratios (indicator of lipid); [Hg] was significantly and negatively related to both. At a standardized fork length of 500?mm, lake trout had significantly higher [Hg] (mean 0.17?µg/g wet wt) than Arctic char (0.09?µg/g). Anadromous and resident Arctic char had significantly lower [Hg] (each 0.04?µg/g) than landlocked Arctic char (0.19?µg/g). Anadromous lake trout had significantly lower [Hg] (0.12?µg/g) than resident lake trout (0.18?µg/g), but no significant difference in [Hg] was seen between landlocked lake trout (0.21?µg/g) and other life history types. Our results are relevant to human health assessments and consumption guidance and will inform models of Hg accumulation in Arctic fish.
PubMed ID
21381088 View in PubMed
Less detail

Concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants in bowhead whale tissues and other biota from northern Alaska: implications for human exposure from a subsistence diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4734
Source
Environ Res. 2005 Jul;98(3):329-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
P F Hoekstra
T M O'Hara
S M Backus
C. Hanns
D C G Muir
Author Affiliation
National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ont., Canada L7R4A6.
Source
Environ Res. 2005 Jul;98(3):329-40
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Biodiversity
Biological Availability
Biotransformation
Chlordan - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
DDT - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Diet
Environmental Pollutants - metabolism - toxicity
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Lindane - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Tissue Distribution
Whales - metabolism
Abstract
Bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus; n = 5) blubber, liver, muscle, kidney, heart, diaphragm, tongue, and uncooked maktak (bowhead whale epidermis and blubber) were collected during subsistence hunts at Barrow, AK, USA (1997-1999) to measure concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs). The exposure of humans to OCs via bowhead whales and other biota [fish, ringed (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), and beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas)] as part of a subsistence diet was evaluated. Concentrations of OCs in bowhead whale tissues were correlated with lipid content (P
PubMed ID
15910787 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contemporary limnology of the rapidly changing glacierized watershed of the world's largest High Arctic lake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298829
Source
Sci Rep. 2019 Mar 14; 9(1):4447
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-14-2019
Author
K A St Pierre
V L St Louis
I Lehnherr
S L Schiff
D C G Muir
A J Poulain
J P Smol
C Talbot
M Ma
D L Findlay
W J Findlay
S E Arnott
Alex S Gardner
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada. kyra2@ualberta.ca.
Source
Sci Rep. 2019 Mar 14; 9(1):4447
Date
Mar-14-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Glacial runoff is predicted to increase in many parts of the Arctic with climate change, yet little is known about the biogeochemical impacts of meltwaters on downstream freshwater ecosystems. Here we document the contemporary limnology of the rapidly changing glacierized watershed of the world's largest High Arctic lake (Lake Hazen), where warming since 2007 has increased delivery of glacial meltwaters to the lake by up to 10-times. Annually, glacial meltwaters accounted for 62-98% of dissolved nutrient inputs to the lake, depending on the chemical species and year. Lake Hazen was a strong sink for NO3--NO2-, NH4+ and DOC, but a source of DIC to its outflow the Ruggles River. Most nutrients entering Lake Hazen were, however, particle-bound and directly transported well below the photic zone via dense turbidity currents, thus reinforcing ultraoligotrophy in the lake rather than overcoming it. For the first time, we apply the land-to-ocean aquatic continuum framework in a large glacierized Arctic watershed, and provide a detailed and holistic description of the physical, chemical and biological limnology of the rapidly changing Lake Hazen watershed. Our findings highlight the sensitivity of freshwater ecosystems to the changing cryosphere, with implications for future water quality and productivity at high latitudes.
PubMed ID
30872603 View in PubMed
Less detail

Drivers of Mercury Cycling in the Rapidly Changing Glacierized Watershed of the High Arctic's Largest Lake by Volume (Lake Hazen, Nunavut, Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297363
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2019 Feb 05; 53(3):1175-1185
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-05-2019
Author
K A St Pierre
V L St Louis
I Lehnherr
A S Gardner
J A Serbu
C A Mortimer
D C G Muir
J A Wiklund
D Lemire
L Szostek
C Talbot
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences , University of Alberta , Edmonton , Alberta T6G 2E9 , Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2019 Feb 05; 53(3):1175-1185
Date
Feb-05-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Across the Arctic, glaciers are melting and permafrost is thawing at unprecedented rates, releasing not only water to downstream aquatic systems, but also contaminants like mercury, archived in ice over centuries. Using concentrations from samples collected over 4 years and calibrated modeled hydrology, we calculated methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg) mass balances for Lake Hazen, the world's largest High Arctic lake by volume, for 2015 and 2016. Glacial rivers were the most important source of MeHg and THg to Lake Hazen, accounting for up to 53% and 94% of the inputs, respectively. However, due to the MeHg and THg being primarily particle-bound, Lake Hazen was an annual MeHg and THg sink. Exports of MeHg and THg out the Ruggles River outflow were consequently very low, but erosion and permafrost slumping downstream of the lake increased river MeHg and THg concentrations significantly before entering coastal waters in Chandler Fjord. Since 2001, glacial MeHg and THg inputs to Lake Hazen have increased by 0.01 and 0.400 kg yr-1, respectively, in step with dramatic increases in glacial melt. This study highlights the potential for increases in mercury inputs to arctic ecosystems downstream of glaciers despite recent reductions in global mercury emissions.
PubMed ID
30596413 View in PubMed
Less detail

A history of total mercury in edible muscle of fish from lakes in northern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172838
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:427-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2005
Author
W L Lockhart
G A Stern
G. Low
M. Hendzel
G. Boila
P. Roach
M S Evans
B N Billeck
J. DeLaronde
S. Friesen
K. Kidd
S. Atkins
D C G Muir
M. Stoddart
G. Stephens
S. Stephenson
S. Harbicht
N. Snowshoe
B. Grey
S. Thompson
N. DeGraff
Author Affiliation
North-South Consultants Inc., 833 Harstone Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3R 1E1.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:427-63
Date
Dec-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Fishes
Food Contamination
Fresh Water
Geological Phenomena
Geology
Humans
Mercury - analysis - standards
Muscles - chemistry
Risk assessment
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - standards
Abstract
Subsistence fishing has been an important source of food for Native People in northern Canada since prehistoric time. Measurements of the levels of mercury in edible muscle of northern fish have been undertaken for over three decades in efforts to evaluate the risks of consuming northern fish. This report summarizes the data obtained from 7974 fish of 25 species from sites distributed from the Yukon to Labrador. The most abundant species were lake trout, lake whitefish, arctic char, walleye, northern pike and burbot. The question being asked was essentially "Are the fish safe to eat?" The results were used to support decisions on fishing and consumption of fish. They were sorted in several ways, into concentration ranges corresponding to human consumption guidelines, into political jurisdictions and into types of bedrock geology. Overall walleye, northern pike and lake trout, usually exceeded the subsistence consumption guideline of 0.2 microg g-1 total mercury and often exceeded the higher guideline of 0.5 microg g-1 total mercury for commercial sales of fish. Mercury in burbot, another facultative predator, was often lower but several still exceeding a guideline. Arctic char collections were mostly from anadromous populations and these had very low levels of mercury, presumably reflecting marine food sources. Lake whitefish were among the cleanest fish examined with 69 of 81 collections falling in the lowest range. Most collections were from sites in sedimentary rock. However a few sites were in metamorphic, intrusive or volcanic rocks and these, taken together, tended to have a higher proportion of sites in the higher ranges of mercury. These results indicate a widespread problem with mercury in subsistence fisheries for predator species of fish with the problem being most problematic for Nunavut.
PubMed ID
16169059 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hydroxylated and methyl sulfone PCB metabolites in adipose and whole blood of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70940
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2004 Sep 20;331(1-3):125-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-2004
Author
G M Sandala
C. Sonne-Hansen
R. Dietz
D C G Muir
K. Valters
E R Bennett
E W Born
R J Letcher
Author Affiliation
University of Windsor, Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, N9B 3P4, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2004 Sep 20;331(1-3):125-41
Date
Sep-20-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Animals
Animals, Wild
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - blood - metabolism
Female
Greenland
Male
Movement
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Ursidae
Abstract
Persistent methyl sulfone (MeSO2-) and hydroxylated (HO-) polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) metabolites have emerged as important classes of environmental contaminants in vertebrate, aquatic biota and humans. In the present study, PCB, MeSO2-PCB and HO-PCB concentrations and congener patterns were determined in the whole blood and adipose tissue of male (n = 7) and female (n = 12) polar bears (Ursus maritimus) of random age (3-25 years of age), and collected in 1999-2001 from the Ittoqqortoormiit/Scoresby Sound area in central East Greenland. There was no significant difference (P 10 ng/g ww). HO-PCB congener patterns in whole blood were not significantly different (P
PubMed ID
15325145 View in PubMed
Less detail

Organochlorine contaminant and stable isotope profiles in Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) from the Alaskan and Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75413
Source
Environ Pollut. 2003;122(3):423-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
P F Hoekstra
B M Braune
T M O'Hara
B. Elkin
K R Solomon
D C G Muir
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1. paul.hoekstra@ec.gc.ca
Source
Environ Pollut. 2003;122(3):423-33
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Chlorobenzenes - analysis
DDT - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Foxes - metabolism
Insecticides - analysis
Lindane - analysis
Liver - chemistry
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Toxaphene - analysis
Abstract
Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) is a circumpolar species distributed across northern Canada and Alaska. Arctic fox muscle and liver were collected at Barrow, AK, USA (n=18), Holman, NT, Canada (n=20), and Arviat, NU, Canada (n=20) to elucidate the feeding ecology of this species and relate these findings to body residue patterns of organochlorine contaminants (OCs). Stable carbon (delta 13C) and nitrogen (delta 15N) isotope analyses of Arctic fox muscle indicated that trophic position (estimated by delta 15N) is positively correlated with increasing delta 13C values, suggesting that Arctic fox with a predominantly marine-based foraging strategy occupy a higher trophic level than individuals mostly feeding from a terrestrial-based carbon source. At all sites, the rank order for OC groups in muscle was polychlorinated biphenyls (Sigma PCB) > chlordane-related compounds (Sigma CHLOR) > hexachlorocyclohexane (Sigma HCH) > total toxaphene (TOX) > or = chlorobenzenes (Sigma ClBz) > DDT-related isomers (Sigma DDT). In liver, Sigma CHLOR was the most abundant OC group, followed by Sigma PCB > TOX > Sigma HCH > Sigma ClBz > Sigma DDT. The most abundant OC analytes detected from Arctic fox muscle and liver were oxychlordane, PCB-153, and PCB-180. The comparison of delta 15N with OC concentrations indicated that relative trophic position might not accurately predict OC bioaccumulation in Arctic fox. The bioaccumulation pattern of OCs in the Arctic fox is similar to the polar bear. While Sigma PCB concentrations were highly variable, concentrations in the Arctic fox were generally below those associated with the toxicological endpoints for adverse effects on mammalian reproduction. Further research is required to properly elucidate the potential health impacts to this species from exposure to OCs.
PubMed ID
12547532 View in PubMed
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.