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31 records – page 1 of 4.

Aesthetic concerns of children and parents in relation to different classifications of the Tooth Surface Index of Fluorosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219682
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Dec;21(6):360-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
D C Clark
H J Hann
M F Williamson
J. Berkowitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Dec;21(6):360-4
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Esthetics, Dental
Fluoridation
Fluorosis, Dental - classification - psychology
Humans
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Increasing prevalence of dental fluorosis for children both from fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities are now well documented. Along with recent studies purporting possible adverse health effects from fluorides, this proven public health intervention is again being challenged. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of dental fluorosis for children from fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas in British Columbia. In addition, children and parents were provided with an opportunity to express concerns about the aesthetics of the child's anterior teeth. Children from representative schools in two communities were surveyed using the Tooth Surface Index of Fluorosis (TSIF). Questionnaires were sent home to parents to detail their child's use of various fluoride preventive practices and residence histories. Completed questionnaires were returned and exams were performed on 1131 children. Of those examined, 60% had dental fluorosis on at least two tooth surfaces, only 8% had scores ranging from "2" to "6", and 52% were classified with a score of "1". Parental and child ratings on the aesthetics or color of the child's teeth suggests that there are few children with aesthetic problems in the TSIF category of "1". While concerns of parents were more common, the actual source of those concerns was not assessed in the questionnaire. Not unexpectedly, children with fluorosis on anterior teeth ranging between TSIF scores of "2" to "6" appear to have increased concerns about tooth color. Data from children with confirmed residence histories from fluoridated communities suggest that the occurrence of aesthetic problems in these children is rare.
PubMed ID
8306613 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the Saskatchewan pit and fissure sealant program: a longitudinal followup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231474
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1989;49(4):206-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A I Ismail
W. King
D C Clark
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1989;49(4):206-11
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Saskatchewan
School Dentistry
Abstract
The Saskatchewan Health Dental Plan (SHDP) is a publicly funded dental insurance program for children between the ages of five and 16 years residing in the province. In 1981, fissure sealants were added as a covered expense. Until September 1, 1987, sealants and other dental treatments covered under the SHDP were provided to schoolchildren by dental therapists in dental clinics established in elementary schools throughout the province. After September 1, 1987, the provision of dental services was transferred to private practitioners in the province. The objectives of this study were to (1) estimate the retention rates of sealants after one, two, and three years of placement; and (2) conduct a longitudinal followup of sealed and unsealed sound teeth to measure the effectiveness of sealants in reducing dental caries incidence. Relative to the first objective, a cohort of children was identified and comparisons were carried out for the periods of 1982-83, 1982-84, and 1982-85. For the last objective, a longitudinal evaluation of effectiveness was carried out only for children five to seven years of age in 1981. Saskatchewan children, who experienced higher caries prevalence than children in the United States, had the highest caries increments on occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth. About 79 percent of the sealants applied by dental therapists were retained three years after application. Sealed teeth experienced 46 percent less caries than unsealed teeth four years after the application of sealants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2810215 View in PubMed
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An outcomes assessment of a hybrid-PBL course in treatment planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208837
Source
J Dent Educ. 1997 Apr;61(4):361-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
J N Walton
D C Clark
N. Glick
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dental Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. jnwalton@unixg.ubc.ca
Source
J Dent Educ. 1997 Apr;61(4):361-7
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Education, Dental - methods - standards
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Planning
Pilot Projects
Problem-Based Learning
Program Evaluation
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Dental - psychology
Thinking
Abstract
As part of an ongoing process of curriculum development, a new course was developed at the University of British Columbia (UBC) to address problems such as lack of student enjoyment of the learning process, poor student preparedness for clinical treatment planning, and underdeveloped critical thinking skills in students beginning their clinical experience. The new course utilized a hybrid problem-based learning (PBL) format that provided students with an overview in lecture format while encouraging active learning in small group tutorials and seminars. Half the second-year class was randomly selected to participate in the new course, while the other half received the standard lectures on the subject. An outcomes assessment examined whether the aforementioned problems had been addressed in the new course. Course participants completed a post-course evaluation, and all students completed a self-assessment of their preparedness and progress in treatment planning and diagnostic. Clinical instructors, who were blind to the identity of the new course participants, were asked to independently assess each student using the same criteria. Results indicate that students who participated in the hybrid-PBL course enjoyed the learning process and later rated themselves as being better prepared and improving more in the areas of treatment planning and diagnostic records than their counterparts, although the latter results were not routinely statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
9158543 View in PubMed
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Appropriate use of fluorides in the 1990s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221553
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Mar;59(3):272-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
D C Clark
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Mar;59(3):272-9
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Dentifrices
Fluorides - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Fluorides, Topical
Fluorosis, Dental - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Prevalence
PubMed ID
8453528 View in PubMed
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Appropriate uses of fluorides for children: guidelines from the Canadian Workshop on the Evaluation of Current Recommendations Concerning Fluorides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219619
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Dec 15;149(12):1787-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-15-1993
Author
D C Clark
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Dec 15;149(12):1787-93
Date
Dec-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Fluoridation - adverse effects - economics - standards
Fluorides - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Fluorosis, Dental - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Prevalence
Toothpastes
Abstract
To prevent fluorosis caused by excessive fluoride ingestion by revising recommendations for fluoride intake by children.
Limiting fluoride ingestion from fluoridated water, fluoride supplements and fluoride dentifrices.
Reduction in the prevalence of dental fluorosis and continued prevention of dental caries.
Before the workshop, experts prepared comprehensive literature reviews of fluoride therapies, fluoride ingestion and the prevalence and causes of dental fluorosis. The papers, which were peer-reviewed, revised and circulated to the workshop participants, formed the basis of the workshop discussions.
Recommendations to limit fluoride intake were vigorously debated before being adopted as the consensus opinion of the workshop group.
Decrease in the prevalence of dental fluorosis with continuing preventive effects of fluoride use. The only significant cost would be in preparing new, low-concentration fluoride products for distribution.
Fluoride supplementation should be limited to children 3 years of age and older in areas where there is less than 0.3 ppm of fluoride in the water supply. Children in all areas should use only a "pea-sized" amount of fluoride dentifrice no more than twice daily under the supervision of an adult.
These recommendations are almost identical to changes to recommendations for the use of fluoride supplements recently proposed by a group of European countries.
The workshop was organized by Dr. D. Christopher Clark, of the University of British Columbia, and Drs. Hardy Limeback and Ralph C. Burgess, of the University of Toronto, and funded by Proctor and Gamble Inc., Toronto, the Medical Research Council of Canada and Health Canada (formerly the Department of National Health and Welfare). The recommendations were formally adopted by the Canadian Dental Association in April 1993.
Notes
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1989 Spring;49(2):78-822619788
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1989;49(5 Spec No):279-892681730
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1988 Fall;48(4):233-403054080
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1988 Apr;116(4):490-53259956
Cites: J Dent Res. 1988 May;67(5):802-63284939
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1988 Feb;16(1):11-53422610
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1986 Fall;46(4):184-73465957
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1986 Jul;113(1):29-333461057
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1985 Oct;42(4):701-74050730
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1985 Jun;13(3):164-73860339
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1984 Jan;108(1):56-96582115
Cites: Swed Dent J. 1982;6(6):233-86963006
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1982 Dec;10(6):335-96961984
Cites: Arch Oral Biol. 1969 Jan;14(1):105-195250255
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Jun;21(3):118-258348782
Cites: Br Dent J. 1992 May 9;172(9):3571356390
Cites: J Dent Res. 1992 May;71(5):1228-371607439
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1991 Fall;51(4):251-91941778
Cites: J Dent Res. 1991 Jul;70(7):1022-82066481
Cites: Caries Res. 1990;24(4):290-72276168
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1990 Summer;50(4):276-812391676
Cites: Adv Dent Res. 1989 Sep;3(2):104-92701155
Cites: J Dent Res. 1990 Feb;69 Spec No:742-50; discussion 820-32179336
Cites: Int Dent J. 1989 Dec;39(4):263-82606563
Cites: Caries Res. 1990;24(1):72-92403486
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Dec;130(6):1199-2082589311
Comment In: CMAJ. 1994 Sep 1;151(5):5178069794
PubMed ID
8261348 View in PubMed
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Are dentists overtreating their patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203438
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1998 Dec;64(11):773-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
D C Clark
Author Affiliation
Division of Prevention and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1998 Dec;64(11):773-4
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Dental Care - standards
Humans
Quality of Health Care - standards
PubMed ID
9879140 View in PubMed
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The challenge of a fluoridation referendum: the results of a referendum in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221607
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):84-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Emerson
D C Clark
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):84-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Fluoridation - adverse effects
Humans
Local Government
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Politics
Public Health
Abstract
On February 15, 1992 the voters in Comox and Courtenay, British Columbia voted out fluoridation after over 20 years experience with the public health measure. This article details what brought about this unfortunate event, what transpired prior to the referendum, and discusses the outcome relative to how the campaign unfolded. The authors describe the opposition and their strategies, and how, in hindsight, the campaign might have been better managed. Not surprisingly, this loss is similar to many before it. Anti-fluoridationists are well funded and organized, and their campaign strategies create enormous challenges for public health officials.
PubMed ID
8334613 View in PubMed
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Current research in preventive dentistry and its impact on the future of dental care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226096
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1991 Jul;57(7):561-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
D C Clark
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dental Studies, University of British Columbia.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1991 Jul;57(7):561-4
Date
Jul-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - prevention & control
Pit and Fissure Sealants
Research
Risk factors
Abstract
To my mind, preventive dentistry has not changed all that much in the last 10 to 15 years. No miracle drug has come on the scene to prevent periodontal disease. There is no caries vaccine to eliminate dental caries. Interestingly, it has been the traditional technologies that have, given the advantage of time, proven their potential. The reality seems to have surpassed even our most optimistic expectations. But while we have learned how to effectively implement these technologies in many instances, the promotion of water fluoridation has lagged. Nevertheless, the improvements in oral health speak well of the work of our predecessors, who shaped the world of modern dental care. It is up to the profession to use existing preventive technologies to their best advantage and to devise even better preventive measures for the 20 per cent to 30 per cent of the population who are at highest risk of caries and periodontal disease. This paper has focused on some points of interest that have been published in the dental literature on preventive dentistry. Other issues represent concerns of the author. I invite comment and discussion on the topics and issues that were raised. Dialogue is healthy.
PubMed ID
1873741 View in PubMed
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The effectiveness of 10% chlorhexidine varnish treatment on dental caries incidence in adults with dry mouth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191832
Source
Gerodontology. 2000 Dec;17(2):67-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
D W Banting
A. Papas
D C Clark
H M Proskin
M. Schultz
R. Perry
Author Affiliation
School of Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. dbanting@julian.uwo.ca
Source
Gerodontology. 2000 Dec;17(2):67-76
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Chlorhexidine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Dental Caries - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Massachusetts
Middle Aged
Placebo Effect
Root Caries - prevention & control
Saliva - microbiology
Treatment Outcome
Xerostomia - complications
Abstract
This study compared a 10% chlorhexidine varnish treatment with placebo and sham treatments for preventing dental caries in adult patients with xerostomia (dry mouth).
The study was a multicentred, randomized, parallel group, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.
All examinations and procedures were performed at Tuft's University, Boston, MA, the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC or the University of Western Ontario, London, ON.
Subjects were adults with recent or current dental caries experience, high salivary levels of cariogenic microorganisms and low salivary flow rates.
236 subjects completed at least one post-treatment examination. There were 697 new carious lesions diagnosed, 446 (64%) located on coronal surfaces and 251 (36%) located on root surfaces. The mean attack rate was 0.23 surfaces/100 surfaces at risk. A treatment difference observed between the Active and Placebo groups was statistically significant for root caries increment (p = .02) and total caries increment (p = .03). A treatment difference observed between the Active and Sham groups was not statistically significant for coronal, root or total caries increment. Analysis of variance of treatment group differences was performed using mutans streptococci counts, salivary flow rates, age, sex, caries prevalence, medications, time to first event and early withdrawal as co-variables. These factors did not meaningfully alter the findings.
The difference between the 10% chlorhexidine varnish and placebo treatments is considered to be highly clinically significant for root caries increment (41% reduction) and for total caries increment (25% reduction) but only for coronal caries increment (14%).
PubMed ID
11808057 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.