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Branched-chain and aromatic amino acids in relation to behavioral problems among young Inuit from Nunavik, Canada: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291899
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 Sep; 82(3):416-422
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Audray St-Jean
Salma Meziou
Cynthia Roy
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Michel Lucas
Author Affiliation
Population Health and Optimal Health Practices Research Unit, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 Sep; 82(3):416-422
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Amino Acids, Aromatic - metabolism
Amino Acids, Branched-Chain - metabolism
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Nunavut
Problem behavior
Abstract
BackgroundObesity and insulin resistance are linked with mood disorders, and elevated concentrations of branched-chain (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids (AAAs). Our study aimed to prospectively assess the relationship between childhood plasma BCAAs and AAAs, and behavioral problems in young Inuit from Nunavik.MethodsWe analyzed data on 181 children (with a mean age of 11.4 years at baseline) involved in the Nunavik Child Development Study. Plasma BCAA and AAA concentrations were measured in childhood (2005-2010). BCAA/AAA tertiles-the ratio of total BCAAs to AAAs-were considered as surrogate categorical independent variables. Behavioral problems were assessed with the Youth Self-Report (YSR) from the Child Behavior Checklist about 7 years later during adolescence (2013-2016). ANOVA ascertained relationships between BCAA/AAA tertiles and YSR outcomes.ResultsAscending BCAA/AAA tertiles were positively associated (Ptrend
Notes
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PubMed ID
28486439 View in PubMed
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Branched-chain and aromatic amino acids in relation to behavioral problems among young Inuit from Nunavik, Canada: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282388
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 May 09;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-09-2017
Author
Audray St-Jean
Salma Meziou
Cynthia Roy
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Michel Lucas
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 May 09;
Date
May-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUNDObesity and insulin resistance are linked with mood disorders, and elevated concentrations of branched-chain (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids (AAAs). Our study aimed to prospectively assess the relationship between childhood plasma BCAAs and AAAs and behavioral problems in young Inuit from Nunavik.METHODSWe analyzed data on 181 children (mean age 11.4 years at baseline) involved in the Nunavik Child Development Study. Plasma BCAA and AAA concentrations were measured in childhood (2005-2010). BCAA/AAA tertiles - the ratio of total BCAAs to AAAs-were considered as a surrogate categorical independent variable. Behavioral problems were assessed with the Youth Self-Report (YSR) from the Child Behavior Checklist about 7 years later during adolescence (2013-2016). ANOVA ascertained relationships between BCAA/AAA tertiles and YSR outcomes.RESULTSAscending BCAA/AAA tertiles were positively associated (Ptrend
PubMed ID
28486439 View in PubMed
Less detail

Metabolic features of adiposity and glucose homoeostasis among school-aged inuit children from Nunavik (Northern Quebec, Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303712
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2021 Dec; 80(1):1858605
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2021
Author
Thierry Comlan Marc Medehouenou
Cynthia Roy
Pierre-Yves Tremblay
Audray St-Jean
Salma Meziou
Gina Muckle
Pierre Ayotte
Michel Lucas
Author Affiliation
Population Health and Optimal Health Practices Research Unit, Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec - Université Laval , Québec, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2021 Dec; 80(1):1858605
Date
Dec-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In contrast to most Indigenous people in Canada, Inuit appeared until recently to have been protected from type 2 diabetes (T2D) related to obesity. We assessed the associations of metabolites (amino acids, acylcarnitines) with adiposity and biomarkers of T2D in school-aged Inuit children of Nunavik (Canada). Concentrations of metabolite were measured in plasma samples from a cross-sectional analysis of 248 children (mean age = 10.8 years). We assessed associations of plasma metabolites with adiposity measures (BMI, skinfold thicknesses) and T2D markers (insulin, glucose, adiponectin). Plasma concentrations of valine and tyrosine were higher in obese and overweight children compared to those of normal weight children (P 
PubMed ID
33395372 View in PubMed
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Overweight and Obesity Prevalence Among School-Aged Nunavik Inuit Children According to Three Body Mass Index Classification Systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263941
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2015 Jul;57(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Thierry Comlan Marc Medehouenou
Pierre Ayotte
Audray St-Jean
Salma Meziou
Cynthia Roy
Gina Muckle
Michel Lucas
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2015 Jul;57(1):31-6
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Little is known about the suitability of three commonly used body mass index (BMI) classification system for Indigenous children. This study aims to estimate overweight and obesity prevalence among school-aged Nunavik Inuit children according to International Obesity Task Force (IOTF), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and World Health Organization (WHO) BMI classification systems, to measure agreement between those classification systems, and to investigate whether BMI status as defined by these classification systems is associated with levels of metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers.
Data were collected on 290 school-aged children (aged 8-14 years; 50.7% girls) from the Nunavik Child Development Study with data collected in 2005-2010. Anthropometric parameters were measured and blood sampled. Participants were classified as normal weight, overweight, and obese according to BMI classification systems. Weighted kappa (?w) statistics assessed agreement between different BMI classification systems, and multivariate analysis of variance ascertained their relationship with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers.
The combined prevalence rate of overweight/obesity was 26.9% (with 6.6% obesity) with IOTF, 24.1% (11.0%) with CDC, and 40.4% (12.8%) with WHO classification systems. Agreement was the highest between IOTF and CDC (?w = .87) classifications, and substantial for IOTF and WHO (?w = .69) and for CDC and WHO (?w = .73). Insulin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein plasma levels were significantly higher from normal weight to obesity, regardless of classification system. Among obese subjects, higher insulin level was observed with IOTF.
Compared with other systems, IOTF classification appears to be more specific to identify overweight and obesity in Inuit children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26095406 View in PubMed
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