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A cohort study of traffic-related air pollution impacts on birth outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157243
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2008 May;116(5):680-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Michael Brauer
Cornel Lencar
Lillian Tamburic
Mieke Koehoorn
Paul Demers
Catherine Karr
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, The University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver BC V6T1Z3 Canada. brauer@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2008 May;116(5):680-6
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Birth weight
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Evidence suggests that air pollution exposure adversely affects pregnancy outcomes. Few studies have examined individual-level intraurban exposure contrasts.
We evaluated the impacts of air pollution on small for gestational age (SGA) birth weight, low full-term birth weight (LBW), and preterm birth using spatiotemporal exposure metrics.
With linked administrative data, we identified 70,249 singleton births (1999-2002) with complete covariate data (sex, ethnicity, parity, birth month and year, income, education) and maternal residential history in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We estimated residential exposures by month of pregnancy using nearest and inverse-distance weighting (IDW) of study area monitors [carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter
Notes
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Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Dec;116(12):A519
PubMed ID
18470315 View in PubMed
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Descriptive epidemiological features of bronchiolitis in a population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153946
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):1196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Mieke Koehoorn
Catherine J Karr
Paul A Demers
Cornel Lencar
Lillian Tamburic
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Ave, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. mieke.koehoorn@ubc.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):1196-203
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Breast Feeding
British Columbia - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The goal was to investigate the epidemiological features of incident bronchiolitis by using a population-based infant cohort.
Outpatient and inpatient health records were used to identify incident bronchiolitis cases among 93,058 singleton infants born in the Georgia Air Basin between 1999 and 2002. Additional health-related databases were linked to provide data on sociodemographic variables, maternal characteristics, and birth outcome measures.
From 1999 to 2002, bronchiolitis accounted for 12,474 incident health care encounters (inpatient or outpatient contacts) during the first year of life (134.2 cases per 1000 person-years). A total of 1588 hospitalized bronchiolitis cases were identified (17.1 cases per 1000 person-years). Adjusted Cox proportional-hazard analyses for both case definitions indicated an increased risk of incident bronchiolitis in the first year of life (follow-up period: 2-12 months) for boys, infants of First Nations status, infants with older siblings, and infants living in neighborhoods with smaller proportions of maternal postsecondary education. The risk also was elevated for infants born to young mothers (
PubMed ID
19047234 View in PubMed
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Effect of early life exposure to air pollution on development of childhood asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145670
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Feb;118(2):284-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Nina Annika Clark
Paul A Demers
Catherine J Karr
Mieke Koehoorn
Cornel Lencar
Lillian Tamburic
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Feb;118(2):284-90
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced
British Columbia
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Nitrogen Oxides - adverse effects
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
There is increasing recognition of the importance of early environmental exposures in the development of childhood asthma. Outdoor air pollution is a recognized asthma trigger, but it is unclear whether exposure influences incident disease. We investigated the effect of exposure to ambient air pollution in utero and during the first year of life on risk of subsequent asthma diagnosis in a population-based nested case-control study.
We assessed all children born in southwestern British Columbia in 1999 and 2000 (n = 37,401) for incidence of asthma diagnosis up to 34 years of age using outpatient and hospitalization records. Asthma cases were age- and sex-matched to five randomly chosen controls from the eligible cohort. We estimated each individual's exposure to ambient air pollution for the gestational period and first year of life using high-resolution pollution surfaces derived from regulatory monitoring data as well as land use regression models adjusted for temporal variation. We used logistic regression analyses to estimate effects of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Feb;118(2):A8020123625
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):A283-420601332Camatini, Marina [removed]; Bolzacchini, Ezio [removed]
PubMed ID
20123607 View in PubMed
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Residential air pollution and otitis media during the first two years of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139748
Source
Epidemiology. 2011 Jan;22(1):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Elaina A MacIntyre
Catherine J Karr
Mieke Koehoorn
Paul A Demers
Lillian Tamburic
Cornel Lencar
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. elaina1@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Epidemiology. 2011 Jan;22(1):81-9
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Ambulatory Care Facilities - utilization
British Columbia
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
: Otitis media is the leading reason young children receive antibiotics or visit a physician. We evaluated the impact of ambient air pollution on outpatient physician visits for otitis media in a population-based birth cohort.
: All children born in southwestern British Columbia during 1999-2000 were followed until the age of 2 years. Residential air pollution exposures were estimated for the first 24 months of life by inverse-distance weighting of monitor data (CO, NO, NO2, O3, PM2.5, PM10, SO2), temporally adjusted land-use regression models (NO, NO2, PM2.5, black carbon, woodsmoke), and proximity to roads and point sources. We used generalized estimating equations to longitudinally assess the relationship between physician visits for otitis media (ICD-9) and average pollutant exposure in the 2 months prior to the visit, after adjustment for covariates.
: Complete exposure and risk-factor data were available for 45,513 children (76% of all births). A total of 42% of subjects had 1 or more physician visits for otitis media during follow-up. Adjusted estimates for NO, PM2.5, and woodsmoke were consistently elevated (eg, relative risk of 1.10 [95% confidence interval = 1.07-1.12] per interquartile range [IQR] increase in NO; 1.32 [1.27-1.36] per IQR increase in days of woodsmoke exposure). No increased risks were observed for the remaining pollutants (eg, 1.00 [0.98-1.03] per IQR increase in PM10; 0.99 [0.97-1.01] per IQR increase in black carbon).
: Modest but consistent associations were found between some measures of air pollution and otitis media in a large birth cohort exposed to relatively low levels of ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
21030866 View in PubMed
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