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The association between vitamin K antagonist therapy and site-specific cancer incidence estimated by using heart valve replacement as an instrumental variable.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129963
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1382-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Thomas P Ahern
Lars Pedersen
Claus Sværke
Kenneth J Rothman
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Timothy L Lash
Author Affiliation
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. nhtpa@channing.harvard.edu
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1382-90
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vitamin K - antagonists & inhibitors
Young Adult
Abstract
Earlier studies suggest a protective association between vitamin K antagonist (VKA) anticoagulants and the incidence of cancer. The authors examined the associations between VKA therapy and incidence of 24 site-specific cancers with a Danish population-based cohort study, using heart valve replacement as an instrumental variable. The authors enrolled 9,727 Danish residents who received a replacement heart valve between 1989 and 2006. The heart valve recipients were matched with 95,481 unexposed individuals on age and sex. The authors used the heart valve replacement instrument to estimate rate ratios associating VKA therapy with incidence of the 24 site-specific cancers using Poisson regression models. Direct associations between VKA therapy and incidence of the 24 cancers were estimated in a prescription validation subset. The instrumental variable associations were plotted according to the inverse normal of rank percentile and subjected to semi-Bayes shrinkage adjustment for multiple comparisons. The pattern of associations was consistent with a null-centered Gaussian distribution. No individual cancer site showed a substantial positive or negative association with VKA therapy in the prescription validation subset, the instrumental variable analysis, or the analysis with semi-Bayes adjustment. These results do not support the existing hypothesis that VKA therapy is associated with reduced cancer risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22047822 View in PubMed
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Atopic dermatitis and risk of skin cancer: a Danish nationwide cohort study (1977-2006).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128708
Source
Am J Clin Dermatol. 2012 Feb 1;13(1):29-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2012
Author
Annette O Jensen
Claus Svaerke
Dora Körmendiné Farkas
Anne B Olesen
Knud Kragballe
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. aoj@dce.au.dk
Source
Am J Clin Dermatol. 2012 Feb 1;13(1):29-36
Date
Feb-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent data suggest a reduced risk of malignant melanoma (MM) among atopic dermatitis (AD) patients, but an increased risk of other skin cancers (including basal cell carcinoma [BCC] and squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]).
We examined the association between AD and skin cancers in a large cohort study in Denmark from 1977 through 2006.
Our cohort consisted of 31 330 AD patients recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry, including AD patients admitted to hospitals and specialized outpatient clinics. Linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry allowed ascertainment of skin cancers. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by comparing the incidence rate of skin cancers among AD patients with that among the general Danish population.
The overall observed number of MM cases among AD patients was 12, with 21 expected, yielding a SIR of 0.59 (95% CI 0.30, 1.02), with the most pronounced protective effect among AD patients with more than 5 years of follow-up (SIR?=?0.46; 95% CI 0.19, 0.95). The corresponding SIRs for BCC and SCC were increased among AD patients (1.41 [95% CI 1.07, 1.83] and 2.48 [95% CI 1.00, 5.11], respectively).
Our findings support an inverse association between AD and MM, but an increased risk of BCC and SCC among AD patients.
PubMed ID
22175302 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk among patients with congenital heart defects: a nationwide follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257685
Source
Cardiol Young. 2014 Feb;24(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Morten Olsen
Ester Garne
Claus Sværke
Lars Søndergaard
Henrik Nissen
Henrik Ø Andersen
Vibeke E Hjortdal
Søren P Johnsen
Jørgen Videbæk
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Cardiol Young. 2014 Feb;24(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Down Syndrome
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We aimed to assess cancer risk in congenital heart defect patients, with and without Down's syndrome, compared with the general population.
We identified all patients born and diagnosed with congenital heart defects from 1977 to 2008 using the Danish National Registry of Patients, covering all Danish hospitals. We compared cancer incidence in the congenital heart defect cohort with that expected in the general population (~5.5 million) using the Danish Cancer Registry, and computed age- and gender-standardised incidence ratios.
We identified 15,905 congenital heart defect patients, contributing a total of 151,172 person-years at risk; the maximum length of follow-up was 31 years (median 8 years). In all, 53 patients were diagnosed with cancer, including 30 female and 23 male patients (standardised incidence ratio = 1.63; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-2.13). Risks were increased for leukaemia, brain tumours, and basal cell carcinoma. After excluding 801 patients with Down's syndrome, the standardised incidence ratio was 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.64). In the subgroup of 5660 non-Down's syndrome patients undergoing cardiac surgery or catheter-based interventions, the standardised incidence ratio was 1.45 (95% confidence interval: 0.86-2.29).
The overall risk of cancer among congenital heart defect patients without Down's syndrome was not statistically significantly elevated. Cancer risk in the congenital heart defect cohort as a whole, including patients with Down's syndrome, was increased compared with the general population, although the absolute risk was low. Studies with longer follow-up and more information on radiation doses are needed to further examine a potential cancer risk associated with diagnostic radiation exposure.
PubMed ID
23328503 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorders, and developmental delay in children born after assisted conception: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153331
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Jan;163(1):72-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Dorte Hvidtjørn
Laura Schieve
Diana Schendel
Bo Jacobsson
Claus Svaerke
Poul Thorsen
Author Affiliation
NANEA, Institute of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, University of Aarhus, Paludan-Müllers vej 17, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. dh@soci.au.dk
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Jan;163(1):72-83
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - adverse effects
Abstract
To assess the existing evidence of associations between assisted conception and cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and developmental delay.
Forty-one studies identified in a systematical PubMed and Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE) search for articles published from January 1, 1996, to April 1, 2008.
Studies written in English comparing children born after assisted conception with children born after natural conception assessing CP, ASD, and developmental delay, based on original data with a follow-up of 1 year or more. Main Exposures In vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection or ovulation induction with or without subsequent intrauterine insemination.
Cerebral palsy, ASD, and developmental delay.
Nine CP studies showed that children born after IVF had an increased risk of CP associated with preterm delivery. In our meta-analysis including 19 462 children exposed to IVF, we estimated a crude odds ratio of 2.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.71-2.77). Eight ASD studies and 30 studies on developmental delay showed inconsistent results. No studies assessed the risk of CP, ASD, or developmental delay in children born after ovulation induction exclusively.
Methodological problems were revealed in the identified studies, and the gaps in our knowledge about the long-term outcomes of children born after assisted conception are considerable, including a lack of information on the long-term consequences of ovulation induction. Possible associations with ASD and developmental delay need assessment in larger studies. Studies on assisted conception and CP from countries outside of Scandinavia are needed, including detailed information on time to pregnancy, underlying cause of infertility, and type of IVF treatment.
PubMed ID
19124707 View in PubMed
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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cancer risk: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128250
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Jun;106(6):845-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jette Brommann Kornum
Claus Sværke
Reimar Wernich Thomsen
Peter Lange
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N DK-8200, Denmark.
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Jun;106(6):845-52
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about the risk of cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including which cancer sites are most affected. We examined the short- and long-term risk of lung and extrapulmonary cancer in a nationwide cohort of COPD patients.
We linked the Danish National Registry of Patients and the nationwide cancer registry, and examined the incidence of various cancers in 236,494 individuals with a first incident hospital contact with COPD during 1980-2008. The observed cancer incidence in this cohort was compared with the expected incidence in the general population on the basis of national age-, sex-, and site-specific incidence rates.
Median follow-up was 3.5 years. During the first year of follow-up, 9434 cancers were diagnosed in COPD patients [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 3.1; 95% CI 3.0 to 3.2]. The 1-year SIR was 8.5 (8.2-8.9) for lung cancer, 5.1 (5.0-5.2) for all tobacco-related cancers, and 1.9 (1.9-2.0) for other cancers. In the following years, cancer incidence was increased 1.4-fold (1.4-1.5) in COPD patients. These patients had an increased risk of developing tobacco-related cancers (SIR = 2.1; 95% CI 2.0-2.1), including cancers of the lung, larynx, tongue, oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, cervix uteri, and urinary tract (with SIRs ranging between 1.3 and 2.8).
Patients with first-time hospital-diagnosed COPD are at considerably increased risk of developing both lung cancer and extrapulmonary cancers. Physicians should be aware of cancer in COPD patients.
PubMed ID
22214771 View in PubMed
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Endocarditis and risk of cancer: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117854
Source
Am J Med. 2013 Jan;126(1):58-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Reimar Wernich Thomsen
Dóra Körmendiné Farkas
Søren Friis
Claus Sværke
Anne Gulbech Ording
Mette Nørgaard
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. rwt@dce.au.dk
Source
Am J Med. 2013 Jan;126(1):58-67
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Endocarditis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunosuppression
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Endocarditis may be a marker for bacteremia-associated occult cancer. Intensive antibiotic treatment in endocarditis is suggested to reduce long-term cancer risk. We examined these hypotheses in a nationwide cohort study.
Endocarditis patients and cancer cases were identified from the Danish National Registry of Patients and the Danish Cancer Registry during 1978-2008. We compared the incidences of various cancers among study subjects to expected incidences based on national age-, sex-, and site-specific rates.
We observed 997 cancers among 8445 endocarditis patients (median follow-up of 3.5 years), reflecting an increased standardized incidence rate (SIR) of 1.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51-1.71). Cancer risk was highly elevated during the first 3 months of follow-up (SIR=8.03; 95% CI, 6.92-9.26), partly due to a 15- to 30-fold increased risk of hematological or liver cancers. Between 3-month and 5-year follow-ups, cancer incidence remained 1.5-fold higher than expected, including 2- and 4-fold increased SIRs for colorectal and liver cancers, respectively. Beyond 5 years of observation, the overall cancer SIR was 1.21 (95% CI, 1.10-1.34). Long-term associations were weak for several cancers hypothesized to be associated with antibiotic use, including prostate, gastric, and breast cancer.
Endocarditis is a substantial clinical marker for presence of occult cancer. We found no evidence of decreased long-term cancer risk after antibiotic treatment for endocarditis.
PubMed ID
23260503 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of an ICD-10 algorithm to detect osteonecrosis of the jaw among cancer patients in the Danish National Registry of Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271323
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2015 Jul;24(7):693-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Vera Ehrenstein
Henrik Gammelager
Morten Schiødt
Sven Erik Nørholt
Bjarne Neumann-Jensen
Troels Bille Folkmar
Lars Pedersen
Claus Svaerke
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Haijun Ma
John Acquavella
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2015 Jul;24(7):693-700
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Bisphosphonate-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaw - diagnosis - epidemiology
Bone Density Conservation Agents - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Electronic Health Records
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Registries
Abstract
This study aimed to validate a predefined algorithm for osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) among cancer patients in the Danish National Registry of Patients and to assess the nature of clinical information recorded in medical charts of ONJ patients.
We identified potential ONJ cases recorded in 2005-2010 among cancer patients at the hospital Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DOMS) in three Danish regions, using a set of codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10). We abstracted DOMS charts of the potential cases, had the ONJ status adjudicated by an expert ONJ adjudication committee (ONJAC), and computed positive predictive values. For patients with ONJAC-confirmed ONJ, we abstracted the charts for information on ONJ clinical course. Sensitivity of the algorithm was computed using a separate sample of 101 known ONJ cases accrued in 2005-2011.
We identified 212 potential ONJ cases, of which 197 (93%) had charts available for abstraction. Eighty-three potential cases were confirmed by ONJAC, with a positive predictive value of 42% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35%-49%). DOMS charts of these 83 cases contained complete information on ONJ clinical course. Information about antiresorptive treatment was recorded for 84% of the patients. Among the 101 known ONJ cases, 74 had at least one prespecified ICD-10 code recorded in the Danish National Registry of Patients within ±90?days of the ONJ diagnosis (sensitivity 73%; 95%CI [64%-81%]).
The predefined algorithm is not adequate for monitoring ONJ in pharmacovigilance studies. Additional case-finding approaches, coupled with adjudication, are necessary to estimate ONJ incidence accurately.
PubMed ID
25974710 View in PubMed
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Lymph node enlargement and risk of haematological and solid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117917
Source
Br J Haematol. 2013 Mar;160(5):599-607
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Henrik Frederiksen
Claus Svaerke
Reimar W Thomsen
Dóra K Farkas
Lars Pedersen
Noel S Weiss
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. hef@dadlnet.dk
Source
Br J Haematol. 2013 Mar;160(5):599-607
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Endocrine System Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Infection - epidemiology
Lymphatic Diseases - etiology
Lymphatic Metastasis - diagnosis - pathology
Lymphoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Unknown Primary - epidemiology
Organ Specificity
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
Enlarged lymph nodes may be a marker of occult cancer, but accurate data on cancer risk are limited. We used population-based Danish medical registries to assess cancer risk in a cohort of patients with a first-time inpatient or outpatient hospital contact for enlarged lymph nodes during 1994-2008. Observed cancer incidences were compared with that expected in the general population. We observed 1750 cancers among 11284 patients with enlarged lymph nodes during median follow up of 4.7 years. Only 389 cases were expected. Cancer risk was 11.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 10.9-12.1%] during the first year of follow up, corresponding to an age- and sex-standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 21.1 (95% CI: 20.0-22.3). One-year SIRs were more than 100 times increased for head and neck cancer and lymphomas. Beyond one year of follow up, overall cancer risk remained 1.4-fold (95% CI: 1.3-1.5-fold) higher than expected, while risk of lymphoma remained six to 10 times higher. Cancer risk was also elevated among patients with other conditions known to be associated with enlarged lymph nodes, such as infections and rheumatic disorders. We conclude that enlarged lymph nodes are a marker of occult cancer and long-term risk of cancer.
PubMed ID
23252600 View in PubMed
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Positive predictive value of primary inpatient discharge diagnoses of infection among cancer patients in the Danish National Registry of Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265809
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;24(8):593-7, 597.e1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Louise Holland-Bill
Hairong Xu
Henrik Toft Sørensen
John Acquavella
Claus Sværke
Henrik Gammelager
Vera Ehrenstein
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;24(8):593-7, 597.e1-18
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infection - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacovigilance
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Abstract
Pharmacovigilance studies of cancer treatment frequently monitor infections. Predictive values of algorithms identifying disease depend on prevalence of the disease in the population under study. We therefore estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of primary inpatient diagnosis of infection among cancer patients in the Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP).
The algorithm to identify infections in the DNPR was based on International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes. A physician blinded to the type of sampled infection reviewed the medical charts and assessed the presence and type of infection. Using the physician global assessment as gold standard, we computed PPVs with and without requiring agreement on infection type.
We retrieved 266 of 272 medical charts (98%). Presence of infection was confirmed in 261 patients, resulting in an overall PPV of 98% (95% confidence interval, 96%-99%). When requiring agreement on infection type, overall PPV was 77%. For skin infections, pneumonia, and sepsis, PPVs were 79%, 93% and 84%, respectively. For these infections, we additionally calculated PPVs using evidence-based criteria as the gold standard. PPV was similar for pneumonia, but lower for skin infections and sepsis.
The Danish National Registry of Patients is suitable for monitoring infections requiring hospitalization among cancer patients.
PubMed ID
25084702 View in PubMed
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Risk and prognosis of cancer in patients with nephrotic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257934
Source
Am J Med. 2014 Sep;127(9):871-7.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Christian F Christiansen
Tracy Onega
Claus Sværke
Dóra Körmendiné Farkas
Bente Jespersen
John A Baron
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: cfc@clin.au.dk.
Source
Am J Med. 2014 Sep;127(9):871-7.e1
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Nephrotic Syndrome - etiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Nephrotic syndrome may be a marker of occult cancer, but population-based studies of this association are lacking. Therefore, we examined the risk and prognosis of cancer in patients with nephrotic syndrome.
We conducted this population-based cohort study in Denmark, including all individuals diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome between 1980 and 2010 without a preceding cancer history. We computed the 5-year risk of cancer accounting for competing risk by death and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer in patients with nephrotic syndrome relative to the general population. We compared the 5-year mortality for patients with cancer after nephrotic syndrome with that for a cancer cohort without a history of nephrotic syndrome using Cox regression adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidity.
Of 4293 individuals with nephrotic syndrome, 338 developed an incident cancer during a median follow-up of 5.7 years. The 5-year risk of any cancer was 4.7% in patients with nephrotic syndrome, a 73% increased risk (SIR, 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.55-1.92). The association was most pronounced for lung cancer, kidney cancer, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. It was highest within 1 year of nephrotic syndrome diagnosis (SIR, 4.49; 95% CI, 3.68-5.42), but remained increased beyond 1 year (SIR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.17-1.53). The 5-year mortality after cancer was 68.5% in patients with cancer with nephrotic syndrome and 63.4% in the cancer comparison cohort (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.42).
Nephrotic syndrome is a marker of occult solid tumors and hematologic malignancies and is associated with a worsened cancer prognosis.
PubMed ID
24838191 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.