Skip header and navigation

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Arctic Primary Aerosol Production Strongly Influenced by Riverine Organic Matter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301898
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2019 Aug 06; 53(15):8621-8630
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-06-2019
Author
Jiyeon Park
Manuel Dall'Osto
Kihong Park
Jung-Hyun Kim
Jongkwan Park
Ki-Tae Park
Chung Yeon Hwang
Gwang Il Jang
Yeontae Gim
Sujin Kang
Sanghun Park
Yong Keun Jin
Seong Soo Yum
Rafel Simó
Young Jun Yoon
Author Affiliation
Korea Polar Research Institute , 26 Songdomirae-ro, Yeonsu-gu , Incheon 21990 , South Korea.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2019 Aug 06; 53(15):8621-8630
Date
Aug-06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The sources of primary and secondary aerosols in the Arctic are still poorly known. A number of surface seawater samples-with varying degrees of Arctic riverine and sea ice influences-were used in a sea spray generation chamber to test them for their potential to produce sea spray aerosols (SSA) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Our interdisciplinary data showed that both sea salt and organic matter (OM) significantly influenced the SSA production. The number concentration of SSA in the coastal samples was negatively correlated with salinity and positively correlated with a number of OM tracers, including dissolved and chromophoric organic carbon (DOC, CDOM), marine microgels and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) but not for viral and bacterial abundances; indicating that OM of riverine origin enhances primary aerosol production. When all samples were considered, transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) were found to be the best indicator correlating positively with the ratio number concentration of SSA/salinity. CCN efficiency was not observed to differ between the SSA from the various samples, despite differences in organic characteristics. It is suggested that the large amount of freshwater from river runoff have a substantial impact on primary aerosols production mechanisms, possibly affecting the cloud radiative forcing.
PubMed ID
31310508 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257928
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):465-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Hye Min Kim
Ji Young Jung
Etienne Yergeau
Chung Yeon Hwang
Larry Hinzman
Sungjin Nam
Soon Gyu Hong
Ok-Sun Kim
Jongsik Chun
Yoo Kyung Lee
Author Affiliation
Korea Polar Research Institute, KIOST, Incheon, Korea; School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):465-75
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - genetics
Alaska
Biomass
Carbon - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Typing
Nitrogen - chemistry
Phylogeny
Proteobacteria - genetics
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 2011 Dec 15;480(7377):368-7122056985
Cites: ISME J. 2012 Jan;6(1):94-10321716311
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 Mar;72(3):1719-2816517615
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Jan 17;103(3):626-3116407148
Cites: Science. 2005 Oct 28;310(5748):657-6016179434
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2011 Aug;13(8):2299-31421554513
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2012 Mar;62(Pt 3):716-2122140171
Cites: ISME J. 2012 May;6(5):1007-1722134642
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2012 Nov;82(2):303-1522404643
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e5189723284808
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e7644024086740
Cites: PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e8476124416279
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Feb;87(2):403-1524117982
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2006 Jul 1;34(Web Server issue):W394-916845035
Cites: BMC Bioinformatics. 2006;7:37116893466
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):428-3517313585
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):513-2317313587
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):452-6517328122
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Aug;73(16):5261-717586664
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2008 Mar;74(5):1620-3318192411
Cites: ISME J. 2008 Aug;2(8):805-1418615117
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2008 Sep;58(Pt 9):2215-2318768632
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2009 Feb;67(2):208-1819049494
Cites: ISME J. 2009 Apr;3(4):442-5319129864
Cites: Nature. 2009 May 28;459(7246):556-919478781
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Aug;75(15):5111-2019502440
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2004 Oct 1;50(1):13-2319712373
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2010 Jan 15;26(2):266-719914921
Cites: Microb Ecol. 2010 Feb;59(2):335-4319705192
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(3):e949020224823
Cites: Extremophiles. 2010 Mar;14(2):205-1220066448
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2010 Mar;19 Suppl 1:54-6620331770
Cites: Nat Methods. 2010 May;7(5):335-620383131
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 May;12(5):1132-4320132284
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 Jul;12(7):1842-5420236166
Cites: ISME J. 2010 Sep;4(9):1206-1420393573
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2010 Oct 1;26(19):2460-120709691
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2010 Oct;76(20):6751-920729324
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 Nov;12(11):2998-300620561020
Cites: BMC Bioinformatics. 2011;12:3821276213
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 May 10;108(19):7850-421518859
Cites: Microbiology. 2011 Jun;157(Pt 6):1551-6421511765
Cites: Microbiology. 1997 Dec;143 ( Pt 12):3913-99421915
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Oct;71(10):5710-816204479
PubMed ID
24893754 View in PubMed
Less detail

Domibacillus tundrae sp. nov., isolated from active layer soil of tussock tundra in Alaska, and emended description of the genus Domibacillus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271992
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2015 Oct;65(10):3407-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Hye Ryeon Gyeong
Kiwoon Baek
Chung Yeon Hwang
Key Hun Park
Hye Min Kim
Hong Kum Lee
Yoo Kyung Lee
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2015 Oct;65(10):3407-12
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Bacillaceae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Diaminopimelic Acid - chemistry
Fatty Acids - chemistry
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptidoglycan - chemistry
Phospholipids - chemistry
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil Microbiology
Tundra
Vitamin K 2 - analogs & derivatives - chemistry
Abstract
A novel Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, aerobic, motile and rod-shaped bacterium designated strain PAMC 80007T was isolated from an active layer soil sample of Council, Alaska. Optimal growth of strain PAMC 80007T was observed at 30?°C, pH?7.0 and in the presence of 2?% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain PAMC 80007T belonged to the genus Domibacillus. This strain was closely related to Domibacillus enclensis (98.3?%), Domibacillus robiginosus (98.3?%) and Domibacillus indicus (97.2?%). Genomic DNA G+C content was 43.5?mol% and genomic relatedness analyses based on the average nucleotide identity and the genome-to-genome distance showed that strain PAMC 80007T is clearly distinguished from the closely related species of the genus Domibacillus. The major fatty acids (>5?%) were iso-C15?:?0 (24.7?%), C16?:?1?11c (16.8?%), anteiso-C15?:?0 (16.5?%), C16?:?0 (15.6?%) and anteiso-C17?:?0 (8.7?%). The major respiratory isoprenoid quinones were menaquinone-6 (MK-6) and menaquinone-7 (MK-7), and the polar lipid profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphoglycolipid, phospholipid and two unidentified lipids. meso-Diaminopimelic acid (type A1?) was present in the cell-wall peptidoglycan, and the major whole-cell sugar was ribose with a minor quantity of glucose. Results from a polyphasic study suggested that strain PAMC 80007T represents a novel species of the genus Domibacillus for which the name Domibacillus tundrae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PAMC 80007T (?=?JCM 30371T?=?KCTC 33549T?=?DSM 29572T). An emended description of the genus Domibacillus is also provided.
PubMed ID
26296675 View in PubMed
Less detail

Halocynthiibacter arcticus sp. nov., isolated from Arctic marine sediment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265103
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2015 Aug 4;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-4-2015
Author
Kiwoon Baek
Yung Mi Lee
Seung Chul Shin
Kyuin Hwang
Chung Yeon Hwang
Soon Gyu Hong
Hong Kum Lee
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2015 Aug 4;
Date
Aug-4-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A Gram-staining-negative, oxidase- and catalase- positive, non-motile, producing white colonies, aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium, PAMC 20958T, was isolated from a marine sediment of the Arctic. Strain PAMC 20958T grew at 10-27 °C (optimally at 21 °C), at pH 5.5-9.5 (optimally at 7.0-7.5) and in the presence of 0.5-7.5 % (w/v) (optimally at 2.0 %) of NaCl. Strain PAMC 20958T showed 97.5 % of 16S rRNA sequence similarity with Halocynthiibacter namhaensis KCTC 32362T and formed a robust phylogenetic clade with this species. Average nucleotide identity value between strain PAMC 20958T and H. namhaensis KCTC 32362T was 79.7 % and the genome-to-genome distance was 13.0 % on average. The genomic DNA G+C content calculated from the genome sequence was 53.2 mol%. The major fatty acids were C18:1 ?7c and/or C18:1 ?6c. The major respiratory isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-10 (Q-10) and major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified aminolipid and two unidentified lipids. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and genotypic and phenotypic data obtained in this study, strain PAMC 20958T (= KCTC 42129T = JCM 30530T) represents the type strain of a novel species of the genus Halocynthiibacter, for which the name Halocynthiibacter arcticus sp. nov. is proposed.
PubMed ID
26243211 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rhodococcus aerolatus sp. nov., isolated from rainwater on the subarctic Bering Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258080
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2014 Nov 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2014
Author
Chung Yeon Hwang
Inae Lee
Yirang Cho
Yung Mi Lee
Kiwoon Baek
You-Jung Jung
Yoon Yong Yang
Taehyoung Lee
Tae Siek Rhee
Hong Kum Lee
Author Affiliation
Korea Polar Research Institute; cyhwang@kopri.re.kr.
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2014 Nov 10;
Date
Nov-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A Gram-positive, rod-shaped and non-motile strain, designated PAMC 27367(T), was isolated from rainwater collected on the Bering Sea. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the strain showed an affiliation with the genus Rhodococcus. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain PAMC 27367(T) formed a robust clade with the type strains of Rhodococcus rhodnii, Rhodococcus aetherivorans and Rhodococcus ruber with the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.3 %, 95.8 % and 95.5 %, respectively. Cells of the strain grew optimally at 25 (o)C and pH 6.5-7.0 in the presence of 0-2 % (w/v) sea salts. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and three unknown phospholipids. The major cellular fatty acids (> 10 %) were iso-C16:0, C17:1 ?8c and 10-methyl C17:0. Cell-wall analysis showed that strain PAMC 27367(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The genomic DNA G+C content was 77.1 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data presented, we propose the name Rhodococcus aerolatus sp. nov. with the type strain PAMC 27367(T) (= KCTC 29240(T) = JCM 19485(T)).
PubMed ID
25385992 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sediminicola arcticus sp. nov., a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from Arctic deep-sea sediment, and emended description of the genus Sediminicola.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260724
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2015 Feb 23;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2015
Author
Chung Yeon Hwang
Inae Lee
Yirang Cho
Yung Mi Lee
You-Jung Jung
Kiwoon Baek
Seung-Il Nam
Hong Kum Lee
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2015 Feb 23;
Date
Feb-23-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile strain, designated PAMC 27266T, was isolated from deep-sea sediment of the Arctic Ocean. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain PAMC 27266T showed the closest affiliation with the genus Sediminicola. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain PAMC 27266T formed a robust clade with Sediminicola lutes NBRC 100966T with the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 98.9%. Genomic relatedness analyses based on the average nucleotide identity and the genome-to-genome distance showed that strain PAMC 27266T is clearly distinguished from S. lutes NBRC 100966T. Cells of strain PAMC 27266T grew optimally at 15oC and pH 6.5-7.5 in the presence of 3.5% (w/v) sea salts. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminophospholipids and two unidentified lipids. The only respiratory quinone was menaquinone-6. The major cellular fatty acids (> 10%) were C16 : 1 ?6c and/or C16 : 1?7c and C15 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content was 37.9 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, genomic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data presented, we propose a new species for strain PAMC 27266T (= KCCM 43038T = JCM 19894T) with the name Sediminicola arcticus sp. nov.
PubMed ID
25713047 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vertical distribution of bacterial community is associated with the degree of soil organic matter decomposition in the active layer of moist acidic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277378
Source
J Microbiol. 2016 Nov;54(11):713-723
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Hye Min Kim
Min Jin Lee
Ji Young Jung
Chung Yeon Hwang
Mincheol Kim
Hee-Myong Ro
Jongsik Chun
Yoo Kyung Lee
Source
J Microbiol. 2016 Nov;54(11):713-723
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The increasing temperature in Arctic tundra deepens the active layer, which is the upper layer of permafrost soil that experiences repeated thawing and freezing. The increasing of soil temperature and the deepening of active layer seem to affect soil microbial communities. Therefore, information on soil microbial communities at various soil depths is essential to understand their potential responses to climate change in the active layer soil. We investigated the community structure of soil bacteria in the active layer from moist acidic tundra in Council, Alaska. We also interpreted their relationship with some relevant soil physicochemical characteristics along soil depth with a fine scale (5 cm depth interval). The bacterial community structure was found to change along soil depth. The relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and candidate phylum WPS-2 rapidly decreased with soil depth, while those of Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, and candidate AD3 rapidly increased. A structural shift was also found in the soil bacterial communities around 20 cm depth, where two organic (upper Oi and lower Oa) horizons are subdivided. The quality and the decomposition degree of organic matter might have influenced the bacterial community structure. Besides the organic matter quality, the vertical distribution of bacterial communities was also found to be related to soil pH and total phosphorus content. This study showed the vertical change of bacterial community in the active layer with a fine scale resolution and the possible influence of the quality of soil organic matter on shaping bacterial community structure.
PubMed ID
27796925 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.