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Cross-sectional study of the differences between measured, perceived and desired body size and their relations with self-perceived health in young adults: The Tromsø Study - Fit Futures 2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279845
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jan 01;:1403494817690941
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-01-2017
Author
Anne-Sofie Sand
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Olaug S Lian
Christopher S Nielsen
Gunn Pettersen
Anne Winther
Nina Emaus
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jan 01;:1403494817690941
Date
Jan-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between measured body size (body mass index (BMI)), perceived body size, weight change wishes and self-perceived health in young adults.
The participants were recruited from a school-based population study in Norway, the Tromsø Study: Fit Futures 2, carried out in 2012-2013. A total of 629 young women and men (aged 18-23 years) reported on the main variables. The data were collected through weight and height measurements and questionnaires. The analyses were performed with descriptive statistics, the ?(2) test and Student's t-test.
A total of 20% of the women and 28% of the men were overweight or obese. There were considerable discrepancies between the measured BMI and perceived body size in both sexes. A substantial number of participants wanted to change their weight. Among the 174 women who reported that they were trying to lose weight, as many as 57 (32.8%) had a low normal weight (BMI 18.5-21.9 kg/m(2)). Correspondingly, among the 66 men who reported that they wanted to gain weight, as many as 19 (28.8%) had a high normal weight (BMI 22-24.9 kg/m(2)). We found no relation between body size perceptions, weight change wishes and self-perceived health.
Discrepancies between measured and perceived body size and weight change wishes are common findings in young adults. The lack of relation with self-perceived health found in our study is surprising and not easy to interpret. To gain more knowledge about these matters, further research, including both qualitative and quantitative studies, is needed.
PubMed ID
28181462 View in PubMed
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Genetic variation in P2RX7 and pain tolerance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300969
Source
Pain. 2018 Jun; 159(6):1064-1073
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Oleg Kambur
Mari A Kaunisto
Bendik S Winsvold
Tom Wilsgaard
Audun Stubhaug
John A Zwart
Eija Kalso
Christopher S Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pain Management and Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Pain. 2018 Jun; 159(6):1064-1073
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Cross-Sectional Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Genetic Variation - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Pain Threshold - physiology
Receptors, Purinergic P2X7 - genetics
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
P2X7 is a nonselective cation channel activated by extracellular ATP. P2X7 activation contributes to the proinflammatory response to injury or bacterial invasion and mediates apoptosis. Recently, P2X7 function has been linked to chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. P2X7 may contribute to pain modulation both by effects on peripheral tissue injury underlying clinical pain states, and through alterations in central nervous system processing, as suggested by animal models. To further test its role in pain sensitivity, we examined whether variation within the P2RX7 gene, which encodes the P2X7 receptor, was associated with experimentally induced pain in human patients. Experimental pain was assessed in Tromsø 6, a longitudinal and cross-sectional population-based study (N = 3016), and the BrePainGen cohort, consisting of patients who underwent breast cancer surgery (N = 831). For both cohorts, experimental pain intensity and tolerance were assessed with the cold-pressor test. In addition, multisite chronic pain was assessed in Tromsø 6 and pain intensity 1 week after surgery was assessed in BrePainGen. We tested whether the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs7958311, previously implicated in clinical pain, was associated with experimental and clinical pain phenotypes. In addition, we examined effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs208294 and rs208296, for which previous results have been equivocal. Rs7958311 was associated with experimental pain intensity in the meta-analysis of both cohorts. Significant associations were also found for multisite pain and postoperative pain. Our results strengthen the existing evidence and suggest that P2X7 and genetic variation in the P2RX7-gene may be involved in the modulation of human pain sensitivity.
PubMed ID
29470314 View in PubMed
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Investigating the Burden of Chronic Pain: An Inflammatory and Metabolic Composite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274788
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2016;2016:7657329
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Kimberly T Sibille
Ólöf A Steingrímsdóttir
Roger B Fillingim
Audun Stubhaug
Henrik Schirmer
Huaihou Chen
Bruce S McEwen
Christopher S Nielsen
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2016;2016:7657329
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background. Chronic pain is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, predominated by cardiovascular disease and cancer. Investigating related risk factor measures may elucidate the biological burden of chronic pain. Objectives. We hypothesized that chronic pain severity would be positively associated with the risk factor composite. Methods. Data from 12,982 participants in the 6th Tromsø study were analyzed. Questionnaires included demographics, health behaviors, medical comorbidities, and chronic pain symptoms. The risk factor composite was comprised of body mass index, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, and triglycerides. Chronic pain severity was characterized by frequency, intensity, time/duration, and total number of pain sites. Results. Individuals with chronic pain had a greater risk factor composite than individuals without chronic pain controlling for covariates and after excluding inflammation-related health conditions (p
PubMed ID
27445627 View in PubMed
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Neuroticism and self-reported somatic health: a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133671
Source
Psychol Health. 2012;27(1):1-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Olav Vassend
Espen Røysamb
Christopher S Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316, Norway. olav.vassend@psykologi.uio.no
Source
Psychol Health. 2012;27(1):1-12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Neurotic Disorders
Norway
Self Report
Somatosensory Disorders
Young Adult
Abstract
Using a twin sample (N?=?188; 53 monozygotic and 39 dizygotic twin pairs, and 4 single twins whose co-twin did not participate), this study sought (1) to estimate heritabilities of neuroticism and of somatic complaints rated on the basis of two different time frames ('the last week' vs. 'in general'); (2) to estimate the genetic association between neuroticism and the complaints indices and (3) to examine to what extent somatic complaints are aetiologically distinct from neuroticism. Using models with common additive genetic (A) and individual-specific environmental (E) factors, the heritabilities for neuroticism and complaints 'in general' and during 'the last week' were 0.46 (0.20-0.65), 0.44 (0.22-0.62), and 0.45 (0.22-0.63), respectively. Nearly 60% of the phenotypic correlation between neuroticism and somatic complaints were accounted for by A. Furthermore, a substantial part of the variance in somatic complaints was due to unique genetic and individual-specific environmental influences unrelated to neuroticism. These results suggest that somatic complaints are moderately heritable and that a considerable portion of the covariance between neuroticism and complaints measures is due to genetic factors. Yet, the findings also suggest that these two attributes are distinct entities with overlapping, but not identical, underlying genetic and environmental influences.
PubMed ID
21678178 View in PubMed
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Persistent post-surgical pain and experimental pain sensitivity in the Tromsø study: comorbid pain matters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257151
Source
Pain. 2014 Feb;155(2):341-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Aslak Johansen
Henrik Schirmer
Audun Stubhaug
Christopher S Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgical Medicine and Intensive Care, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: aslak.johansen@unn.no.
Source
Pain. 2014 Feb;155(2):341-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods - psychology
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Self Report
Abstract
In a large survey incorporating medical examination (N=12,981), information on chronic pain and surgery was collected, and sensitivity to different pain modalities was tested. Tolerance to the cold pressor test was analysed with survival statistics for 10,486 individuals, perceived cold pressor pain intensity was calculated for 10,367 individuals, heat pain threshold was assessed for 4,054 individuals, and pressure pain sensitivity for 4,689 individuals. Persistent post-surgical pain, defined by self-report, was associated with lower cold pressor tolerance (sex-adjusted hazard ratio=1.34, 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.66), but not when adjusting for other chronic pain. Other experimental pain modalities did not differentiate between individuals with or without post-surgical pain. Of the individuals with chronic pain (N=3352), 6.2% indicated surgery as a cause, although only 0.5% indicated surgery as the only cause. The associations found between persistent post-surgical pain and cold pressor tolerance is largely explained by the co-existence of chronic pain from other causes. We conclude that most cases of persistent post-surgical pain are coexistent with other chronic pain, and that, in an unselected post-surgical population, persistent post-surgical pain is not significantly associated with pain sensitivity when controlling for comorbid pain from other causes. A low prevalence of self-reported persistent pain from surgery attenuates statistically significant associations. We hypothesize that general chronic pain is associated with central changes in pain processing as expressed by reduced tolerance for the cold pressor test.
PubMed ID
24145207 View in PubMed
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Persistent postsurgical pain in a general population: prevalence and predictors in the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125864
Source
Pain. 2012 Jul;153(7):1390-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Aslak Johansen
Luis Romundstad
Christopher S Nielsen
Henrik Schirmer
Audun Stubhaug
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgical Medicine and Intensive Care, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. aslak.johansen@unn.no
Source
Pain. 2012 Jul;153(7):1390-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Population-based data on the prevalence of persistent postsurgical pain are scarce. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of persistent postsurgical pain in a general population and to describe associated physical, social, and psychological factors, including symptoms of nerve injury and sensitization. A cross-sectional survey was performed in northern Norway with questionnaire items covering surgery, pain, and sensory abnormalities in the area of surgery. Of the 12,982 participants, 24.0% (3111) had undergone one or more surgical procedures during the 3 years preceding the survey. Of these, 2043 had the surgery performed more than 3 months before the investigation. Persistent pain in the area of surgery was reported by 40.4% of the patients (826 of 2043), moderate or severe pain by 18.3% (373 of 2043). Hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, or both was reported by 24.5% (501 of 2043). There were strong associations between sensory abnormalities and persistent pain, increasingly with higher pain intensities; odds ratios were 2.68 for hypoesthesia and 6.27 for hyperesthesia. Of the 826 individuals reporting persistent pain in the anatomical area of surgery, 51.0% reported chronic pain when questioned without specific reference to the surgery. The present study supports evidence from clinical studies of persistent postsurgical pain, indicating a high prevalence, but reveals large discrepancies in report of pain, depending on the questions asked and the context in which the questions are presented. Strong associations between sensory abnormalities and pain indicate neuropathic mechanisms in a major proportion of cases.
Notes
Comment In: Pain. 2012 Jul;153(7):1344-522424875
PubMed ID
22445291 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and cold pain tolerance in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304212
Source
Eur J Pain. 2021 Mar; 25(3):637-650
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2021
Author
Anders P Årnes
Christopher S Nielsen
Audun Stubhaug
Mats K Fjeld
Laila A Hopstock
Alexander Horsch
Aslak Johansen
Bente Morseth
Tom Wilsgaard
Ólöf A Steingrímsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Department of Pain, Department of Community Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2021 Mar; 25(3):637-650
Date
Mar-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The relationship between habitual physical activity (PA) and experimental pain tolerance has been investigated in small samples of young, healthy and/or single-sex volunteers. We used a large, population-based sample to assess this relationship in men and women with and without chronic pain.
We used data from the sixth and seventh Tromsø Study surveys (2007-2008; 2015-2016), with assessed pain tolerance of participants with the cold pressor test (CPT: dominant hand in circulating cold water at 3°C, maximum test time 106 s), and self-reported total amount of habitual PA in leisure time (n = 19,087), exercise frequency (n = 19,388), exercise intensity (n = 18,393) and exercise duration (n = 18,343). A sub-sample had PA measured by accelerometers (n = 4,922). We used Cox regression to compare CPT tolerance times between self-reported PA levels. For accelerometer-measured PA, we estimated hazard ratios for average daily activity counts, and for average daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA done in bouts lasting 10 min or more. Models were tested for PA-sex, and PA-chronic pain and PA-moderate-to-severe chronic pain interactions.
Leisure-time PA, exercise intensity and exercise duration were positively associated with CPT tolerance (p 
PubMed ID
33165994 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and cold pain tolerance in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311981
Source
Eur J Pain. 2021 03; 25(3):637-650
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2021
Author
Anders P Årnes
Christopher S Nielsen
Audun Stubhaug
Mats K Fjeld
Laila A Hopstock
Alexander Horsch
Aslak Johansen
Bente Morseth
Tom Wilsgaard
Ólöf A Steingrímsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Department of Pain, Department of Community Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2021 03; 25(3):637-650
Date
03-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Exercise
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Pain threshold
Self Report
Abstract
The relationship between habitual physical activity (PA) and experimental pain tolerance has been investigated in small samples of young, healthy and/or single-sex volunteers. We used a large, population-based sample to assess this relationship in men and women with and without chronic pain.
We used data from the sixth and seventh Tromsø Study surveys (2007-2008; 2015-2016), with assessed pain tolerance of participants with the cold pressor test (CPT: dominant hand in circulating cold water at 3°C, maximum test time 106 s), and self-reported total amount of habitual PA in leisure time (n = 19,087), exercise frequency (n = 19,388), exercise intensity (n = 18,393) and exercise duration (n = 18,343). A sub-sample had PA measured by accelerometers (n = 4,922). We used Cox regression to compare CPT tolerance times between self-reported PA levels. For accelerometer-measured PA, we estimated hazard ratios for average daily activity counts, and for average daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA done in bouts lasting 10 min or more. Models were tested for PA-sex, and PA-chronic pain and PA-moderate-to-severe chronic pain interactions.
Leisure-time PA, exercise intensity and exercise duration were positively associated with CPT tolerance (p 
PubMed ID
33165994 View in PubMed
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The role of labor pain and overall birth experience in the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms: a longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258291
Source
Birth. 2014 Mar;41(1):108-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Susan Garthus-Niegel
Cecilie Knoph
Tilmann von Soest
Christopher S Nielsen
Malin Eberhard-Gran
Author Affiliation
TU Dresden and at the Department of Psychosomatics and Health Behavior, Institute and Outpatient Clinics of Occupational and Social Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2014 Mar;41(1):108-15
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Labor Pain - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the role of labor pain and overall birth experience in the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms in a comprehensive framework.
The study sample (N = 1893) comprised women with a vaginal delivery and was drawn from the Akershus Birth Cohort, which targeted all women scheduled to give birth at Akershus University Hospital in Norway. Questionnaires were given at three different stages: from pregnancy weeks 17 to 32, from the maternity ward, and from 8 weeks postpartum. Data were also obtained from the hospital's birth record. Using structural equation modeling, a prospective mediation model was tested.
Posttraumatic stress symptoms were significantly related to both labor pain (r = 0.23) and overall birth experience (r = 0.39). A substantial portion (33%) of the effect of labor pain on posttraumatic stress symptoms was mediated by the overall birth experience.
Although the results of this study showed that both labor pain and overall birth experience played a role in the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms after childbirth, overall birth experience appeared to be the central factor. The women's birth experience was not only related to posttraumatic stress symptoms directly but also mediated a substantial portion of the effect of labor pain on posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future work should address which areas of birth experience confer protective effects on women to improve clinical care.
PubMed ID
24654643 View in PubMed
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Tinnitus and associations with chronic pain: The population-based Tromsø Study (2015-2016).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303468
Source
PLoS One. 2021; 16(3):e0247880
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2021
Author
Jannike H-L Ausland
Bo Engdahl
Bente Oftedal
Ólöf A Steingrímsdóttir
Christopher S Nielsen
Laila A Hopstock
Magnar Johnsen
Oddgeir Friborg
Jan H Rosenvinge
Anne E Eggen
Norun H Krog
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Skøyen, Oslo, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2021; 16(3):e0247880
Date
2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Tinnitus and pain have many similarities. Both are subjective sensations that may turn chronic, they are often accompanied by hypersensitivity in their respective sensory system, and overlapping brain changes have been observed. Since no population study has examined the empirical association between chronic pain and tinnitus, the present study aimed to explore the relationship in a general adult population. We used data from the seventh survey of the Tromsø Study (2015-2016). Participants (aged =40) responded to questions about pain and tinnitus. Using multiple logistic regression, we analysed the adjusted relationship between chronic pain and tinnitus in the full sample (n = 19,039), using several tinnitus definitions ranging from tinnitus >5 minutes within the past 12 months (broadest definition) to at least weekly and highly bothersome tinnitus (strictest definition). We also analysed relationships between number of body regions with pain, pain intensity and bothering, and tinnitus >5 minutes, among participants with chronic pain (n = 11,589). We found an association between chronic pain and tinnitus that was present irrespective of tinnitus definition, but was stronger with more bothersome tinnitus. With chronic pain, the odds of tinnitus >5 minutes was 64% higher, while odds of at least weekly, highly bothersome tinnitus was 144% higher than without chronic pain. Among participants with chronic pain, the number of pain regions was the pain variable most strongly associated with tinnitus >5 minutes (OR = 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14-1.20) for an increase of one region), whereas the other pain variables (intensity and bothering) showed weaker associations. All chronic pain variables had significant interactions with age, with the strongest associations for the youngest individuals (40-54 years). Our findings support the existence of an association between chronic pain and tinnitus and emphasises the importance of examining for comorbid pain in tinnitus patients to provide a more comprehensive treatment of tinnitus.
PubMed ID
33651844 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.