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Academic achievement and smoking initiation in adolescence: a general growth mixture analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129529
Source
Addiction. 2012 Apr;107(4):819-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Alexandre J S Morin
Daniel Rodriguez
Jean-Sébastien Fallu
Christophe Maïano
Michel Janosz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Sherbrooke, QC, Canada. alexandre.morin@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Addiction. 2012 Apr;107(4):819-28
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parenting
Quebec
Questionnaires
Smoking - psychology
Social Class
Abstract
This study aims to: (i) explore the relations between smoking initiation and different profiles of academic achievement trajectories in early to mid-adolescence; and (ii) to investigate whether background characteristics (gender, ethnicity, grade repetition, parental education) and proximal processes (parental practices, extra-curricular involvement) predicted class membership and smoking initiation.
Four-year longitudinal cohort study (7th-10th grade).
Adolescents completed the questionnaires during school hours.
At total of 741 adolescents with no history of smoking in grade 7 participating in the Montreal Adolescent Depression Development Project.
Self-report questionnaires were used to assess predictors and previous smoking in year 1, and smoking initiation by the end of the study. Grade point average (GPA) was obtained twice yearly from school records.
Three academic achievement trajectories were identified and found to differ significantly in rates of smoking initiation: persistently high achievers (7.1% smoking), average achievers (15.1% smokers) and unstable low achievers (49.1% smoking). Further, results showed that general parenting practices and parental education indirectly reduced the likelihood of smoking by reducing the risk of membership in classes with lower GPA.
Adolescents who do well in school are less likely to smoke and it may be cost-effective for smoking prevention to focus on the few (12%) easy to identify unstable low achievers who form 35% of smoking onsets. In addition, as parental support and democratic control reduced the likelihood of poor academic performance, promoting essential generic parenting skills from a young age may also prevent future onsets of smoking in adolescence.
PubMed ID
22098175 View in PubMed
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Factors influencing mental health providers' intention to use telepsychotherapy in First Nations communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113952
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;50(2):323-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Johana Monthuy-Blanc
Stéphane Bouchard
Christophe Maïano
Monique Séguin
Author Affiliation
Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada.
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;50(2):323-43
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Male
Mental Health Services - standards - utilization
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - instrumentation - standards
Quebec - ethnology
Telemedicine - standards - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
Telemental health is the use of information and communications technologies and broadband networks to deliver mental health services and support wellness. Although numerous studies have demonstrated the efficiency and utility of telemental health, certain barriers may impede its implementation, including the attitudes of mental health service providers. The current study draws on the technology acceptance model (TAM) to understand the role of mental health service providers' attitudes and perceptions of telemental health (psychotherapy delivered via videoconferencing) on their intention to use this technology with their patients. A sample of 205 broadly defined mental health service providers working on 32 First Nations reserves in the province of Quebec completed the questionnaire adapted to assess TAM for telepsychotherapy. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling provided evidence for the factor validity and reliability of the TAM in this sample. The key predictor of the intention to use telepsychotherapy was not mental health providers' attitude toward telepsychotherapy, nor how much they expected this service to be complicated to use, but essentially how useful they expect it to be for their First Nations patients. If telemental health via videoconferencing is to be implemented in First Nations communities, it is essential to thoroughly demonstrate its utility to mental health providers. Perceived usefulness will have a positive impact on attitudes toward this technology, and perceived ease of use will positively influence perceived usefulness. Cultural issues specific to the populations receiving telemental health services may be more efficiently addressed from the angle of perceived usefulness.
PubMed ID
23666941 View in PubMed
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