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Changes since 1980 in body mass index and the prevalence of overweight among inschooling children in Nuuk, Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4730
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Christina Schnohr
Thorkild l Sørensen
Birgit Vollmer-Larsen Niclasen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, The Panum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. christina@schnohr.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):157-62
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Arctic Regions
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child Nutrition
Child Nutrition Disorders - prevention & control
Child Welfare - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - standards
Health status
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine the trends which have occurred during the past generation in body mass index (BMI) and in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children in public schools in Nuuk, Greenland. STUDY DESIGN: The study is a retrospective cohort study of BMI among inschooling children (age 6 or 7 years old). A database was created on the basis of files from school-nurses containing information on height and weight among children having attended school in Nuuk since 1970. The database contained 10,121 measurements in total, whereas 2,801 were on inschooling children. Measurements from these children form the basis of this study. Mean and quartiles of BMI among the inschooling children in 5-year intervals were used to determine the development in BMI since 1980. On the basis of international cut-points for use among children and adolescents, the proportion of overweight and obese children and the trends since 1980 were determined. RESULTS: The mean BMI has risen by a total of a bit more than 6% since 1980, corresponding to a rise of 1.2-3.8% for every 5-year period. Increases are also observed when assessing the proportion of overweight and obese, which were 6.6% and 0.9%, respectively, among the inschooling children during the period 1980-1984. These proportions increased to 16.5% and 5.2%, respectively, in 2000-2004. CONCLUSION: This study has provided evidence that during the past two decades, children in Nuuk have undergone a development towards a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):107-915945280
PubMed ID
15945285 View in PubMed
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Conceptualizing and contextualizing food insecurity among Greenlandic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113776
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:19928
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Michal Molcho
Steven Arnfjord
Christina Schnohr
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. niclasen@greennet.gl
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:19928
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Behavior
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Diet
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental health
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To review the context of food insecurity in Greenlandic children, to review and compare the outcomes related to food insecurity in Greenlandic children, in other Arctic child populations and in other western societies, and to explore the measure used by the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study.
The study includes literature reviews, focus group interviews with children and analyses of data from the HBSC study. HBSC is an international cross-national school-based survey on child and adolescent health and health behaviour in the age groups 11, 13 and 15 years and performed in more than 40 countries. The item on food insecurity is "Some young people go to school or to bed hungry because there is not enough food in the home. How often does this happen to you?" (with the response options: "Always", "Often", "Sometimes", or "Never").
The context to food security among Inuit in Arctic regions was found to be very similar and connected to a westernization of the diet and contamination of the traditional diet. The major challenges are contamination, economic access to healthy food and socio-demographic differences in having a healthy diet. The literature on outcomes related to food insecurity in children in Western societies was reviewed and grouped based on 8 domains. Using data from the Greenlandic HBSC data from 2010, the item on food security showed negative associations on central items in all these domains. Focus group interviews with children revealed face and content validity of the HBSC item.
Triangulation of the above-mentioned findings indicates that the HBSC measure of food shortage is a reliable indicator of food insecurity in Greenlandic schoolchildren. However, more research is needed, especially on explanatory and mediating factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23687639 View in PubMed
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Does educational level influence the effects of smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and obesity on mortality? A prospective population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9391
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(4):250-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Christina Schnohr
Lise Højbjerre
Mette Riegels
Luise Ledet
Tine Larsen
Kirsten Schultz-Larsen
Liselotte Petersen
Eva Prescott
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(4):250-6
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - mortality
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study aims at examining whether the relation between established risk factors and mortality differs with socioeconomic status as measured by level of education. METHODS: A population-based sample of 14,399 women and 16,236 men aged 20-93 years from Copenhagen was stratified into three educational levels measured as basic schooling, and the effect of smoking habits, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and body mass index, respectively, on mortality was assessed. RESULTS: Those with the lowest level of education were most frequently heavy smokers, heavy drinkers, physically inactive, and obese. During a mean follow up of 16 years 10,952 subjects died. Compared with subjects with the lowest educational level, women with the highest educational level had a relative risk of 0.80 (95% CI; 0.70-0.91), and men of 0.71 (0.65-0.78). Heavy smoking compared with never smoking implied a more than twofold increased risk at all three educational levels among both men and women. The relation between alcohol intake and mortality was J-shaped on all three educational levels. There were decreasing risk functions describing the relations between physical activity and mortality on all three strata. Further, subjects who were either very lean or obese had increased risks of death compared with those of normal weight at all educational levels in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: The difference in distribution of the main known risk factors may be part of the explanation for the differences in mortality risk. However, these risk factors seem to influence mortality equally at different educational levels. Therefore, social inequalities in mortality do not seem to be explained only by differences in effect of lifestyle risk factors, but are also related to the social rank or unexamined factors within.
PubMed ID
15370764 View in PubMed
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The intake of fruit and sweets in rural and urban Greenland--development from 1994 to 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134926
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):186-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Mette Rasmussen
Ina Borup
Christina Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden. niclasen@greennet.gl
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):186-94
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Candy
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Greenland
Humans
Male
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The aim of this study is to explore the intake of fruit and sweets in Greenlandic schoolchildren aged 11, 13 and 15 years in villages, towns and the capital by cross-sectional data collected in 4 comparative surveys from 1994 to 2006. Study design. Repeated cross-sectional study.
Data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey, with responses from 1,302 students in 1994, 1,648 in 1998, 891 in 2002 and 1,366 in 2006, each in the age groups of 11, 13 and 15 years.
From 1994 to 2006, the odds ratio for eating fruit daily showed a decline while odds for never eating fruit increased in children living in all types of habitations. For all survey years the intake of fruit was lowest in villages and in 2006 only about 15-20% of village children consumed fruit every day. No general trends were found in the daily intake of sweets or for never eating sweets. Only 6% or less of the respondents never ate sweets. Minor age group and gender differences were seen. For sweets, children in the capital in 2006 had a lower daily use than village children.
Greenland is in the process of nutritional transition. The increase in the proportion of schoolchildren that do not meet the national recommendations for daily fruit consumption and the failure to reduce children's intake of sweets is worrying. The intake of fruit was, for all years, lowest in the villages and was probably related (among other things) to cost and access. The implications of the findings are discussed.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):231
PubMed ID
21527069 View in PubMed
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