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Emergence of resistance of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a thermal injury patient treated with quinupristin-dalfopristin and cultured epithelial autografts for wound closure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187898
Source
Burns. 2002 Nov;28(7):696-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Christina M Rose
Kathleen J Reilly
Linwood R Haith
Mary L Patton
Robert J Guilday
Michael J Cawley
Bruce H Ackerman
Author Affiliation
Health System/Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
Source
Burns. 2002 Nov;28(7):696-8
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burns - therapy
Chloramphenicol - therapeutic use
Cross Infection - drug therapy
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Enterococcus faecium - drug effects
Graft Survival
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Skin Transplantation
Vancomycin Resistance
Virginiamycin - pharmacology
Abstract
Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and faecalis (VRE) remains a major complication among critically ill patients. A 26-year-old patient with 65% total body surface area burns (TBSA) was infected with several E. faecium strains during his admission that were resistant to vancomycin. Because chloramphenicol was the standard treatment at this time, this drug was initiated until, the organism was identified as E. faecium and reported as susceptible to quinupristin-dalfopristin. Given these data, it was then decided to discontinue the chloramphenicol therapy. Quinupristin-dalfopristin therapy resulted in initial reduction of fever and white blood cell counts that continued over the next 5 days. However, on day 7 of quinupristin-dalfopristin therapy, a return of fever and elevation of the white blood cell count was noted and a repeated E. faecium blood culture demonstrated sudden resistance to quinupristin-dalfopristin (Bauer-Kirby zone size
PubMed ID
12417169 View in PubMed
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