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A 4-year review of pediatric mental health emergencies in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148300
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Amanda S Newton
Samina Ali
David W Johnson
Christina Haines
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Rachel A Keaschuk
Philip Jacobs
Terry P Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. mandi.newton@ualberta.ca
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Humans
Infant
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We sought to determine and compare rates of pediatric mental health presentations and associated costs in emergency departments (EDs) in Alberta.
We examined 16 154 presentations by 12 589 patients (patient age
PubMed ID
19788789 View in PubMed
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The association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152515
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 May;48(4):420-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Dawn S Hartfield
Jonathan Tan
Jerome Y Yager
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Don Spady
Christina Haines
William R Craig
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. dawn.hartfield@capitalhealth.ca
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 May;48(4):420-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices
Female
Humans
Infant
Iron - blood - deficiency
Male
Odds Ratio
Retrospective Studies
Seizures, Febrile - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures in a large cohort of children aged 6 to 36 months.
A retrospective case control study with 361 patients who presented with febrile seizures to the emergency department and 390 otherwise healthy controls who presented with a febrile illness to the emergency department were reviewed to determine iron status using the MCV, RDW, and hemoglobin.
A total of 9% of cases had iron deficiency (ID) and 6% had iron deficiency anemia (IDA), compared to 5% and 4% of controls respectively. The conditional logistic regression odds ratio for ID in patients with febrile seizures was 1.84 (95% CI, 1.02-3.31).
Children with febrile seizures were almost twice as likely to be iron deficient as those with febrile illness alone. The results suggest that screening for ID should be considered in children presenting with febrile seizure.
PubMed ID
19229063 View in PubMed
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Public engagement on ethical principles in allocating scarce resources during an influenza pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136465
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Apr 12;29(17):3111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2011
Author
Tracey M Bailey
Christina Haines
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Thomas J Marrie
Olive Yonge
Robert Lake
Ben Herman
Mark Ammann
Author Affiliation
Health Law Institute, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2H5. tbailey@law.ualberta.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Apr 12;29(17):3111-7
Date
Apr-12-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Child
Child, Preschool
Disaster planning
Female
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the views of students, support staff and academic staff at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada on the allocation of scarce resources during an influenza pandemic to discover if there were any shared values.
A web-based questionnaire was circulated to students, support staff and academic staff asking them how they would rank the priority of eleven different groups for access to scarce resources. They were also asked to select one of seven priority access plans.
The highest priority was given to health care workers by 89% of respondents, closely followed by emergency workers (85%). Only 12.7% of respondents gave politicians high priority. Respondents favored the "Save the most lives" priority access (39.9%) (N=5220).
Current policies in place for the allocation of scarce resources during an influenza pandemic may not properly reflect the views of the general public. Further public consultation should be undertaken in order to uncover how they would allocate scarce resources.
PubMed ID
21376119 View in PubMed
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Who comes back? Characteristics and predictors of return to emergency department services for pediatric mental health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144414
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2010 Feb;17(2):177-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Amanda S Newton
Samina Ali
David W Johnson
Christina Haines
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Rachel A Keaschuk
Philip Jacobs
Mario Cappelli
Terry P Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. mandi.newton@ualberta.ca
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2010 Feb;17(2):177-86
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Mood Disorders
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Triage
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate predictors of emergency department (ED) return visits for pediatric mental health care. The authors hypothesized that through the identification of clinical and health system variables that predict return ED visits, which children and adolescents would benefit from targeted interventions for persistent mental health needs could be determined.
Data on 16,154 presentations by 12,589 pediatric patients (
PubMed ID
20370747 View in PubMed
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Willingness to volunteer during an influenza pandemic: perspectives from students and staff at a large Canadian university.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158574
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2008 Mar;2(2):71-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Tracey Bailey
Christina Haines
Robert Lake
Benjamin Herman
Olive Yonge
Thomas J Marrie
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. rhonda.rosychuk@ualberta.ca
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2008 Mar;2(2):71-9
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Questionnaires
Students, Medical
Universities
Volunteers - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
A future influenza pandemic will require greater demand on numerous essential services and a reduced capacity to meet that demand. Recruitment of volunteers is an important issue for pre-pandemic planning.
To identify factors and attitudes towards volunteerism in the event of a pandemic of influenza.
A 42-item web-questionnaire was administered to all faculty, staff and students at the University of Alberta. Respondents indicated their willingness to volunteer. Responses were dichotomized and logistic regression models were developed to capture the association between willingness to volunteer and (i) demographic and information source variables, (ii) risk perception and general knowledge, and (iii) volunteering attitudes and priority access variables.
Many factors predicted willingness to volunteer and several involved interactions with other variables. Individuals who were older, relied on University Health Centre information and who had past volunteerism experience were generally more likely to be willing to volunteer. Those willing to volunteer were more likely to think spread could be prevented by covering mouth when coughing/sneezing, and treatment would include drinking fluids. Those who thought influenza would be treated by antibiotics were less willing to volunteer. Likely volunteers thought that healthcare students should be encouraged to volunteer if there was a healthcare worker shortage.
This study provides guidance for those who are preparing universities to deal with pandemic influenza. The results suggest factors that might be important in the recruitment of volunteers during an influenza pandemic and these factors might be relevant for other sectors as well.
PubMed ID
19453473 View in PubMed
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