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Supporter or obstructer; experiences from contact person activities among Swedish women with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7174
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2005 Jan 25;5(1):9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-2005
Author
Christina Carlsson
Mef Nilbert
Kerstin Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. christina.g.carlsson@lthalland.se
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2005 Jan 25;5(1):9
Date
Jan-25-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Audiovisual Aids
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews
Middle Aged
Narration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care - psychology
Self-Help Groups
Social Isolation
Social Support
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Swedish patient associations for breast cancer patients (PABCPs) offer patients with breast cancer unlimited meetings with a breast cancer survivor, a contact person (CP). We applied the voluntary action perspective in this interview study with members of Swedish PABCPs in order to explore how women with breast cancer experienced their contact with a CP from a PABCP. METHODS: Audio-taped narratives from 8 women were analysed using Reissman's monitoring and Gee's analysis structure. RESULTS: Three themes appeared: 1. Shared experiences give new perspectives on having cancer, 2. Feelings of isolation are a part of the identity of the illness and 3. Relations with others enable self-help. However, the relationship with the CP is sensitive to timing, correct information and understanding. CONCLUSIONS: CPs act as sounding boards and should optimally have capacity for listening, gives support and act as partner in this conversation. On the other hand, CPs should be aware that their presence and limited general medical knowledge could at times disturb the patient's psychological recovery and strengthen feelings of isolation. Thus, PABCPs must be careful in selecting CPs and offer relevant educational activities related to the themes identified herein.
PubMed ID
15670335 View in PubMed
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The 2015 National Cancer Program in Sweden: Introducing standardized care pathways in a decentralized system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284148
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Jens Wilkens
Hans Thulesius
Ingrid Schmidt
Christina Carlsson
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Protocols - standards
Continuity of Patient Care
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Policy
Humans
National Health Programs
Patient satisfaction
Politics
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Starting in 2015, the Swedish government has initiated a national reform to standardize cancer patient pathways and thereby eventually speed up treatment of cancer. Cancer care in Sweden is characterized by high survival rates and a generally high quality albeit long waiting times. The objective with the new national program to standardize cancer care pathways is to reduce these waiting times, increase patient satisfaction with cancer care and reduce regional inequalities. A new time-point for measuring the start of a care process is introduced called well-founded suspicion, which is individually designed for each cancer diagnosis. While medical guidelines are well established earlier, the standardisation is achieved by defining time boundaries for each step in the process. The cancer reform program is a collaborative effort initiated and incentivized by the central government while multi-professional groups develop the time-bound standardized care pathways, which the regional authorities are responsible for implementing. The broad stakeholder engagement and time-bound guidelines are interesting approaches to study for other countries that need to streamline care processes.
PubMed ID
27823827 View in PubMed
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Motives for becoming and remaining member of patient associations: a study of 1,810 Swedish individuals with cancer associations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17258
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2005 Dec;13(12):1035-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Christina Carlsson
Amir Baigi
Dick Killander
Ullabeth Sätterlund Larsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Oncology, Lund University, 221 85, Lund, Sweden. christina.g.carlsson@lthalland.se
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2005 Dec;13(12):1035-43
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Neoplasms
Patient Participation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Societies
Sweden
Abstract
Patient associations for cancer patients (PACPs) are increasing in number as well as in the number of members. We utilised a questionnaire to investigate how members of 13 PACPs motivated their memberships. The study included 1,810 individuals who had been treated for breast cancer, gynaecological cancer, or prostate cancer. Through questionnaires these individuals were asked to articulate why they became and chose to remain members. Descriptive statistics and content analyses were used to analyse the open and structured questions. Motives for membership reflected both benefits for the individuals and the welfare of others; themes such as 'needs related to having cancer' (reported by 33% as motives for becoming members; 14% for remaining members), 'wanted to use the PACP's information and activities' (24%; 38%) and 'wanted to support the PACP and its possibilities to have an impact' (9%; 20%) were dominant. The theme 'needs and experiences related to having cancer' was more common among members with breast cancer (38%) and ovarian cancer (36%) than among members with prostate cancer (25%), whereas 53% of men with prostate cancer reported 'wanted to use the PACP's information and activities' compared to 19-9% among female members. The motives showed that needs related to having cancer and that activities and information offered by the PACPs were important to the members, as were their beliefs that the PACP prompted issues that were important to the members.
PubMed ID
15660225 View in PubMed
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The national program on standardized cancer care pathways in Sweden: Observations and findings half way through.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297585
Source
Health Policy. 2018 Sep; 122(9):945-948
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Ingrid Schmidt
Johan Thor
Thomas Davidson
Fredrik Nilsson
Christina Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Evaluation and Analysis, System Analysis Unit, The National Board of Health and Welfare, Rålambsvägen 3, S-10630 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: Ingrid.schmidt@socialstyrelsen.se.
Source
Health Policy. 2018 Sep; 122(9):945-948
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Delivery of Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Oncology - methods - organization & administration
National Health Programs
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care
Sweden
Time-to-Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In 2015, the Swedish government initiated a national cancer reform program to standardize cancer care pathways. Primary aims included shortened waiting times among patients with suspected cancer, increased patient satisfaction and reduced regional variation. The implementation phase of the program is now more than half way through and both achievements and challenges have been identified. The ongoing evaluation demonstrates that professional engagement and adjustments on the meso- and micro-level of the system are essential to achieving sustainable improvements. Waiting times have shortened for the pathways launched first, and patients are satisfied with a more transparent process. Physicians in primary care are satisfied to inform patients about the pathways but point out problems with comorbidity and complicated diagnostic procedures related to unspecific symptoms. Mechanisms and ethical considerations behind possible crowding-out effects need to be thoroughly highlighted and discussed with staff and management. The results so far appear promising but meso- and micro-levels of the system need to be more involved in the design processes.
PubMed ID
30075866 View in PubMed
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Limited impact on self-concept in individuals with Lynch syndrome; results from a national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133572
Source
Fam Cancer. 2011 Dec;10(4):633-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Helle Vendel Petersen
Mary Jane Esplen
Steen Ladelund
Inge Bernstein
Lone Sunde
Christina Carlsson
Mef Nilbert
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark. helle.vendel.petersen@hvh.regionh.dk
Source
Fam Cancer. 2011 Dec;10(4):633-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis - genetics - psychology
Denmark
Family
Female
Genetic Counseling - psychology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - psychology
Genetic Testing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Self Concept
Young Adult
Abstract
An increasing number of individuals seek genetic counseling and hereby learn about hereditary cancer in the family. Lynch syndrome is associated with an inherited high risk for colorectal and gynecological cancer, but knowledge about how family members at risk perceive their situation is limited. We used the national Danish HNPCC register to collect data on self-concept from 413 individuals with Lynch syndrome. The recently developed Lynch syndrome self-concept scale contains 20 items within two subscales related to stigma-vulnerability and bowel symptom-related anxiety. Significantly higher total scores, indicating a greater impact on self-concept, were reported by females and by individuals with experience from cancer in close relatives, whereas individuals with less formal education scored significantly higher on the stigma and vulnerability subscale. Scores in the upper quartile were more often reported by women (odds ratio 1.8) and by individuals with less education (OR 1.8). This study provides the first extended use of the Lynch syndrome self-concept scale and suggests that the majority of the Danish mutation carriers adapt well to the situation, though knowledge about the increased risk of cancer seem to have a greater impact in females, individuals with less education and those with experience of cancer in close relatives.
PubMed ID
21691837 View in PubMed
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