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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jun 3;130(11):1121
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-2010
Author
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Jan Maehlen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jun 3;130(11):1121
Date
Jun-3-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Humans
Norway
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Apr 8;130(7):756-820379340
PubMed ID
20531492 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of data from the Cause of Death Registry and the Norwegian Patient Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271698
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Nov 17;135(21):1949-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-17-2015
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Anne Gro Pedersen
Lilian Leistad
Jonas Minet Kinge
Marta Ebbing
Stein Emil Vollset
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Nov 17;135(21):1949-53
Date
Nov-17-2015
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The quality of the data in the Cause of Death Registry is crucial to produce reliable statistics on causes of death. The Cancer Registry of Norway uses data from the Norwegian Patient Register to request information from hospitals regarding patients registered with cancer in the patient registry, but not in the cancer registry. We wanted to investigate whether data from the Norwegian Patient Register can also be used to advantage in the Cause of Death Registry.
Data from the Cause of Death Registry on deaths that occurred during the period 2009?–?2011 (N = 124,098) were collated with data on contact with somatic hospitals and psychiatric institutions during the last year of life, retrieved from the Norwegian Patient Register. Causes of death were grouped in the same way as in standard statistics on causes of death.
Out of 124,098 deaths, altogether 34.9% occurred in somatic hospitals. A total of 80.9% of all deceased had been admitted to a somatic hospital and/or had attended an outpatient consultation during their last year of life. The proportion with hospital contact was highest for those whose cause of death was cancer. In cases of unknown/unspecified cause of death, more than half also had contact with hospitals, but the majority of these were registered with only outpatient consultations. Altogether 5.4% of all deceased had been admitted to and/or had an outpatient consultation in a psychiatric institution during their last year of life. For those whose cause of death was suicide, this proportion amounted to 41.8%.
In case of incomplete information on the cause of death, data from the Norwegian Patient Register can supply valuable information on where the patient has been treated, thus enabling the Cause of Death Registry to contact the hospitals in question. However, any potential benefit is restricted by the fact that deceased persons with unknown/unspecified causes of death had less frequently been admitted to hospital during their last year of life.
PubMed ID
26577321 View in PubMed
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Data quality in the Causes of Death Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264783
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 May 5;135(8):768-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-5-2015
Author
Anne Gro Pedersen
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 May 5;135(8):768-70
Date
May-5-2015
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Registries - standards
PubMed ID
25947599 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in a well-defined Norwegian population with trends in incidence, intervention rate, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265029
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 May;61(5):1168-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Andreas Reite
Kjetil Søreide
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Jan Terje Kvaløy
Morten Vetrhus
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 May;61(5):1168-74
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneurysm, Ruptured - mortality - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - surgery
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Ruptured infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs) represent both a life-threatening emergency for the affected patient and a considerable health burden globally. The aim of this study was to investigate the contemporary epidemiology of rAAA in a defined Norwegian population for which both hospital and autopsy data were available.
This was a retrospective, single-center population-based study of rAAA. The study includes all consecutively diagnosed prehospital and in-hospital cases of rAAA in the catchment area of Stavanger University Hospital between January 2000 and December 2012. Incidence and mortality rates (crude and adjusted) were calculated using national demographic data.
A total of 216 patients with primary rAAA were identified. The adjusted incidence rate for the study period was 11.0 per 100,000 per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.6-12.5). Twenty patients died out of the hospital, and 144 of the 196 patients (73%) admitted to the hospital underwent surgery. The intervention rate varied from 48% to 81% during the study period. The adjusted mortality rate was 7.5 per 100,000 per year (95% CI, 6.3-8.8). No differences in the incidence and mortality rates were found in comparing early and late periods. The 90-day standardized mortality ratio for the study period was 37.2 (95% CI, 31.6-43.7). The overall 90-day mortality was 68% (146 of 216 persons) and 51% (74 of 144 persons) for the patients treated for rAAA.
We found a stable incidence and mortality rate during a decade. The prehospital death rate was lower (9%), the intervention rate (73%) higher, and the total mortality (68%) lower than in most other studies. Geographic and regional differences may influence the epidemiologic description of rAAA and hence should be taken into consideration in comparing outcomes for in-hospital mortality and intervention rates.
PubMed ID
25659456 View in PubMed
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High Norwegian prostate cancer mortality: evidence of over-reporting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297936
Source
Scand J Urol. 2018 Apr; 52(2):122-128
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Sven Löffeler
Adrian Halland
Harald Weedon-Fekjær
Anastasia Nikitenko
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Erik Skaaheim Haug
Author Affiliation
a Department of Urology , Sykehuset I Vestfold (Vestfold Hospital Trust), Halfdan Wilhelmsens Allé , Tønsberg , Norway.
Source
Scand J Urol. 2018 Apr; 52(2):122-128
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Norway - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Registries
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the level of misattribution of prostate cancer deaths in Norway based on the county of Vestfold in the years 2009-2014.
The study included 328 patients registered as dead from prostate cancer (PCD; part I of death certificate), 126 patients with prostate cancer as other significant condition at death (OCD; part II of death certificate) and 310 patients who died with a diagnosis of prostate cancer not registered on the death certificate (PC-DCneg) in Vestfold County in 2009-2014. The complete cohort with patients' names and dates of birth was provided by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The true cause of death of all patients was evaluated based on patient journals.
Over-reporting of prostate cancer deaths in the PCD group was 33% while under-reporting in the OCD and PC-DCneg groups was 19% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between registered and observed causes of death was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.78-0.83). Misattribution of prostate cancer deaths increased significantly with patient age and decreasing Gleason score.
Prostate cancer mortality statistics in Norway are relatively accurate for patients aged ?75 years), who represent the large majority of prostate cancer deaths. Over-reporting of prostate cancer deaths among elderly people may not be an exclusively Norwegian phenomenon and may affect prostate cancer mortality statistics in other countries.
PubMed ID
29325479 View in PubMed
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How dangerous is BASE jumping? An analysis of adverse events in 20,850 jumps from the Kjerag Massif, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163601
Source
J Trauma. 2007 May;62(5):1113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Kjetil Soreide
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Vibeke Knutson
Author Affiliation
Acute Care Medicine Research Network, Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, and Department of Pathology, Stavanger University Hospital, Norway. ksoreide@mac.com
Source
J Trauma. 2007 May;62(5):1113-7
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Rescue Work - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
Extreme sports, including BASE (building, antenna, span, earth) jumping, are rapidly increasing in popularity. Associated with risk for injuries and deaths, this activity may pose a burden on the emergency system. Hitherto, no reports exist on accidents and deaths associated with BASE jumping.
We reviewed records of 20,850 BASE jumps from 1995 to 2005 at the Kjerag massif in Norway. Frequency of deaths, accidents, and involvement of helicopter and climbers in rescue are analyzed. Fatalities were scored for injury severity scores (Abbreviated Injury Scale score, Injury Severity Score, New Injury Severity Score) on autopsy.
During an 11-year period, a total of 20,850 jumps (median, 1,959; range, 400-3,000) resulted in 9 fatal (0.04% of all jumps; 1 in every 2,317 jumps) and 82 nonfatal accidents (0.4% of all jumps; 1 in every 254 jumps). Accidents increased with the number of jumps (r=0.66; p=0.007), but fatalities did not increase, nor did activation of helicopter or climbers in rescue (p>0.05). Helicopter activation (in one-third of accidents) in rescue correlated with number of accidents (r=0.76, p=0.007), but not climbers. Postmortem examination (n=7) of fatalities revealed multiple, severe injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale score>or=3) sustained in several body regions (median, Injury Severity Score 75; range, 23-75). Most nonfatal accidents were related to ankle sprains/fracture, minor head concussion, or a bruised knee.
BASE jumping appears to hold a five- to eightfold increased risk of injury or death compared with that of skydiving. The number of accidents and helicopter activation increases with the annual number of jumps. Further analysis into the injury severity spectrum and associated hospital burden is required.
PubMed ID
17495709 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jan 28;130(2):146-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-2010
Author
Lars Slørdal
Anita Skogholt
Kjell Aarstad
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Marianne B Brekke
Olav A Haugen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for laboratoriemedisin, barne- og kvinnesykdommer, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet og Avdeling for klinisk farmakologi, St. Olavs hospital, Olav Kyrres gate 17, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. lars.slordal@ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jan 28;130(2):146-8
Date
Jan-28-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fatal Outcome
Forensic Toxicology
Humans
Male
Methanol - poisoning
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Solvents - poisoning
Abstract
BACKGROUND: At the turn of 2007/2008, four Norwegian men died after ingestion of commercially available supposedly denatured ethanol. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The four deaths are presented and discussed. RESULTS: Methanol concentrations, consistent with lethal methanol poisoning, were detected in blood and urine for all four. The imbibed mixture was subsequently shown to contain a 70/30 mixture of methanol/ethanol. INTERPRETATION: The events emphasize the importance of investigating methanol findings from deceased to identify the source, and that investigations are instigated promptly to prevent further exposure.
PubMed ID
20125204 View in PubMed
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[Prioritization of hospital autopsies]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71459
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Nov 30;122(29):2787-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-2002
Author
Torgeir Wergeland Sørbye
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Kenneth Dickstein
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for kirurgi Oppland sentralsykehus Lillehammer 2629 Lillehammer. dr_torgeir@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Nov 30;122(29):2787-90
Date
Nov-30-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making
English Abstract
Female
Forensic Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Health Priorities
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Norway
Privatization
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Routines for requesting autopsies in hospitals in Norway differ. At the Central Hospital in Rogaland, physicians usually fill out a form requesting an autopsy when a patient dies. The physician can choose between "high", "ordinary" or "low priority". In this study we investigated which patients were given highest priority and which factors influenced the priority made by the referring physician. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study. All requests for an autopsy during the year 2000 were reviewed, except forensic medicine cases and perinatal deaths. We included 785 requests in the study. 237 autopsies were performed: an autopsy rate of 30.2%. RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION: The requesting physicians considered 17% "high priority", 44% "ordinary priority" and 39% "low priority". Significantly higher priorities were set for those who died young, those who died after a short stay in hospital, and for those who died in intensive care units. Sex and time of death did not influence priorities. The recommendation required on the autopsy request form leads to more appropriate decisions by pathologists and strengthens the relationship between clinicians and pathologists.
PubMed ID
12523147 View in PubMed
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Serum concentrations of cardiac troponin T in sudden death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30170
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2004 Sep;25(3):213-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Øyvind Hetland
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Rogaland Central Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. c.l.ellingsen@labmed.uio.no
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2004 Sep;25(3):213-5
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Death, Sudden - pathology
Female
Forensic Medicine
Heart Injuries - blood
Humans
Immunoassay
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardium - metabolism
Postmortem Changes
Prospective Studies
Troponin T - blood
Abstract
Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause of sudden death of natural causes in most western countries. By autopsy, there may be no gross or histologic evidence of acute myocardial damage unless the patient survived for several hours following the event. Cardiac troponin in serum has become the recommended biochemical marker for myocardial injury in the clinical setting. We performed a prospective study on 102 autopsied subjects at the Central Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway. Femoral blood was sampled for subsequent analysis of cardiac troponin T (cTnT). In the subjects with morphologic evidence of recent myocardial injury (n = 34), the mean serum cTnT level was 1.95 microg/L compared with 0.16 microg/L in the subjects with a noncardiac cause of death (n = 35) and 0.61 microg/L in the group with probable sudden cardiac death without morphologic signs of acute myocardial injury (n = 33). The observed differences in mean serum cTnT levels between the groups were statistically significant (P
PubMed ID
15322463 View in PubMed
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«The child has lived and breathed.» Forensic examinations of newborns 1910-1912.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105735
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Dec 10;133(23-24):2498-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2013
Author
G Cecilie Alfsen
Christian Lycke Ellingsen
Lotte Hernæs
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Dec 10;133(23-24):2498-501
Date
Dec-10-2013
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Female
Forensic Pathology - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant Mortality - history
Infant, Newborn
Infanticide - history
Live Birth
Lung - pathology
Norway
Pregnancy
Stillbirth
Abstract
One hundred years ago, forensic examination of deceased infants was not an uncommon task for doctors in Norway. The key questions were whether the infant had been born alive and whether the manner of death could be explained. The decomposition of the corpses, which had often lain hidden long before they were examined, posed a considerable problem. Notwithstanding the known shortcomings in the criteria used for assessment of breathing (the lung flotation test), and the fact that the bodies were often severely decomposed, the lung flotation test and the supposed signs of asphyxiation were used indiscriminately. This absence of association between theoretical knowledge and practice may have had its origin in societal conditions in which clandestine birth and the killing of newborns was not uncommon.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Dec 10;133(23-24):2444-524326486
PubMed ID
24326503 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.