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Acceptance of the smoking cessation intervention in a large population-based study: the Inter99 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67180
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Charlotta Pisinger
Jørgen Vestbo
Knut Borch-Johnsen
Troels Thomsen
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Nordre Ringvej, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. chpi@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: Potential exists for improving the impact of quit-smoking programmes, by recruiting smokers in early motivational stages, by using active recruitment strategies, and by offering professional assistance to quit. METHODS: This was a randomized population-based intervention study, in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 2,408 daily smokers in all motivational stages were included. All participants completed a questionnaire, and underwent a health examination and a lifestyle consultation. Smokers in the high-intensity intervention were offered assistance to quit smoking in smoking cessation groups. RESULTS: Before the lifestyle consultation only 11% of the smokers stated that they planned to quit within one month. After the lifestyle consultation 27% accepted smoking cessation in groups and an additional 12% planned to quit without assistance. Of the smokers who accepted smoking cessation groups 23% had not been planning to quit before the lifestyle consultation. Being a woman, having high tobacco consumption, having a long smoking history, having tried to quit within the previous year, and having a higher motivation to quit predicted participation in smoking cessation groups. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to recruit a large number of smokers in early motivational stages by using active recruitment strategies and by offering assistance to quit. Lifestyle consultations markedly increased the number of smokers willing to try to quit. Smokers preferred assistance to quit in a smoking cessation group to quitting on their own; therefore, it is important to improve recruitment strategies for smoking cessation programmes.
PubMed ID
15823975 View in PubMed
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The association between active and passive smoking and frequent pain in a general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96355
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Jun 2;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-2010
Author
Charlotta Pisinger
Mette Aadahl
Ulla Toft
Hanne Birke
Joakim Zytphen-Adeler
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Jun 2;
Date
Jun-2-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is controversial whether the association between back pain, and other types of chronic pain, and smoking is causal or not. AIM: To examine the relationship between frequent pain and smoking, and between frequent pain and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in smokers and non-smokers. METHODS: A randomised population-based study, Inter99 (1999-2006), Denmark. Subjects in the intervention groups (N=6784; participation rate=52.5%) completed self-report questionnaires. Cross-sectional data from baseline were analysed in adjusted logistic regression analyses to investigate the relationship between active and passive smoking and frequent pain in the back, abdomen, joints and head. RESULTS: Daily smokers reported significantly more frequent pain in every of the six locations, and in several, minimum three, locations (OR=1.98 (95%CI=1.6-2.4)) than never smokers. We found a dose-response relationship between frequent pain and intensity of both active and passive smoking (test-for-trend p
PubMed ID
20627783 View in PubMed
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Association between the Five Factor personality traits and perceived stress: is the effect mediated by general self-efficacy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99703
Source
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2011 Jan 6;:1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-6-2011
Author
Jeanette Frost Ebstrup
Lene Falgaard Eplov
Charlotta Pisinger
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2011 Jan 6;:1-13
Date
Jan-6-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Ill-health resulting from chronic stress is influenced by personality traits leading to different ways of appraising and coping with life's daily hassles. Using a large population sample the study aimed to investigate possible associations between perceived stress and the personality dimensions of neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and to explore the role of general self-efficacy (GSE). A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted at the Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark, in 2006-2008. Men and women (N=3471) aged 18-69, were randomly sampled in the suburbs of Copenhagen. We used the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale and the General Self-Efficacy Scale. Negative associations were found between perceived stress and extroversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness - the latter initially non-significant - whilst neuroticism had a positive association. The associations with agreeableness and openness became positive and significant, respectively, when GSE was included. All five personality-stress models were mediated by GSE, with extroversion and conscientiousness having the strongest mediating effect. The strongest stress-association was found for neuroticism. GSE was shown to change the impact and interpretation of the personality dimensions on perceived stress. These results indicate that GSE is an important factor to consider in the link between personality and perceived stress.
PubMed ID
21213153 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific mortality according to urine albumin creatinine ratio in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268854
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e93212
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Tea Skaaby
Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen
Tarunveer Singh Ahluwalia
Peter Rossing
Torben Jørgensen
Betina Heinsbæk Thuesen
Charlotta Pisinger
Knud Rasmussen
Allan Linneberg
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e93212
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Albuminuria - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - urine
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - urine
Cause of Death
Creatinine - urine
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Urine albumin creatinine ratio, UACR, is positively associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and diabetes in observational studies. Whether a high UACR is also associated with other causes of death is unclear. We investigated the association between UACR and cause-specific mortality.
We included a total of 9,125 individuals from two population-based studies, Monica10 and Inter99, conducted in 1993-94 and 1999-2001, respectively. Urine albumin creatinine ratio was measured from spot urine samples by standard methods. Information on causes of death was obtained from The Danish Register of Causes of Death until 31 December 2010. There were a total of 920 deaths, and the median follow-up was 11.3 years.
Multivariable Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis showed statistically significant positive associations between UACR status and risk of all-cause mortality, endocrine nutritional and metabolic diseases, mental and behavioural disorders, diseases of the circulatory system, and diseases of the respiratory system with hazard ratios 1.56, 6.98, 2.34, 2.03, and 1.91, for the fourth UACR compared with the first, respectively. Using UACR as a continuous variable, we also found a statistically significant positive association with risk of death caused by diseases of the digestive system with a hazard ratio of 1.02 per 10 mg/g higher UACR.
We found statistically significant positive associations between baseline UACR and death from all-cause mortality, endocrine nutritional and metabolic diseases, and diseases of the circulatory system and possibly mental and behavioural disorders, and diseases of the respiratory and digestive system.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24675825 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional associations between the five factor personality traits and leisure-time sitting-time: the effect of general self-efficacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120725
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2013 May;10(4):572-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Jeanette Frost Ebstrup
Mette Aadahl
Lene Falgaard Eplov
Charlotta Pisinger
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2013 May;10(4):572-80
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Extraversion (Psychology)
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Inventory
Psychological Tests
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Efficacy
Young Adult
Abstract
Leisure-time sitting-time (LTST) is seen as a possible independent risk-factor for physical and mental health, but research on psychological determinants is sparse. Associations between sitting-time and the personality dimensions of neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and the role of general self-efficacy (GSE) were investigated.
A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted at the Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark, in 2006-08. Men and women (N = 3471) aged 18 to 69, were randomly sampled in the suburbs of Copenhagen. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory, the General Self-Efficacy-Scale, and the Physical Activity Scale 2 were used.
Negative associations were found between LTST and extroversion, conscientiousness, and openness, while neuroticism showed a positive association (R2 = .13). The associations with agreeableness became significantly positive, when GSE was included. All 5 associations were mediated by GSE, with mediation proportions between 23%-60%; but with modest effect sizes.
These cross-sectional results indicate that personality traits and GSE could be considered as associates of LTST; but future longitudinal data are necessary to make causal statements and rule out alternative models fitting data.
PubMed ID
22975590 View in PubMed
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The Danish fat tax-Effects on consumption patterns and risk of ischaemic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270653
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Aug;77:200-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Malene Bødker
Charlotta Pisinger
Ulla Toft
Torben Jørgensen
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Aug;77:200-3
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - economics
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control
Risk factors
Taxes - economics
Abstract
To examine the effects on consumption and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) of the Danish fat tax, effective from October 2011 to January 2013.
We used comprehensive retail outlet data on the sale of twelve foodstuff categories targeted by the fat tax. Data covered January 2010 to July 2013. IHD risk was assessed by modelling first the effect of changes in intake of monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and saturated fat and dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol and subsequently modelling the resulting changes in risk of IHD using two different methods.
The total sale of the included foodstuffs decreased by 0.9%. The fat tax was associated with marginal changes in population risk of IHD. One estimate suggests an increased population risk of IHD by 0.2% and the other estimate suggests that the risk of IHD decreased by 0.3%.
The Danish fat tax had a marginal effect on population consumption of fat and risk of IHD. Fat taxes have to be carefully designed to prevent possible adverse effects from outweighing its beneficial effects on health outcomes. Policymakers must therefore be more ambitious in relation to food taxes, e.g. by implementing more comprehensive tax-subsidy schemes.
Notes
Comment In: Prev Med. 2015 Aug;77:204-625998882
PubMed ID
25982852 View in PubMed
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Diet and exercise intervention in a general population--mediators of participation and adherence: the Inter99 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166069
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Oct;17(5):455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Ulla N Toft
Lis H Kristoffersen
Mette Aadahl
Lisa von Huth Smith
Charlotta Pisinger
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. ulto@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Oct;17(5):455-63
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Counseling - utilization
Denmark
Diet - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods - utilization
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk-Taking
Self Efficacy
Abstract
Drop-out rates are high in many lifestyle programmes. To promote adherence, the aim of this study was to identify mediators of participation in a diet and exercise (DE) intervention in a general population.
Data were baseline data from a randomized non-pharmacological clinical trial in Copenhagen during 1999-2001. The participation rate was 53.3%. Participants at high risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and who were offered participation in a DE counselling group intervention were included (N = 2022). Clinical characteristics, and demographic, psychosocial and lifestyle factors were measured.
Mediators of acceptance of participation were awareness of an unhealthy lifestyle or a bad health, low self-rated care of own health, perceived susceptibility of cardiovascular disease (CVD; overall and associated with lifestyle), high degree of motivation towards dietary changes and low self-efficacy about increasing physical activity. Overweight and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)/screen-detected diabetes predicted acceptance whereas an absolute risk score for IHD was inverse associated with acceptance. Mediators of high adherence were low self-efficacy about changing dietary habits and perceived susceptibility of CVD and furthermore screen-detected diabetes and overweight predicted high adherence.
Awareness of unhealthy lifestyle, perceived susceptibility of disease and motivation towards lifestyle changes were important mediators of participation. Screen-detected diabetes/IGT predicted participation and adherence whereas overweight individuals were more likely to accept but also to drop out of the course. The use of an absolute risk score in health promotion should be further evaluated.
PubMed ID
17170019 View in PubMed
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Does a population-based multi-factorial lifestyle intervention increase social inequality in dietary habits? The Inter99 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130081
Source
Prev Med. 2012 Jan;54(1):88-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Ulla Toft
Marie Jakobsen
Mette Aadahl
Charlotta Pisinger
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. ulto@glo.regionh.dk
Source
Prev Med. 2012 Jan;54(1):88-93
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Intervention Studies
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk Reduction Behavior
Social Class
Abstract
To investigate whether the effect of an individualised multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on dietary habits differs across socioeconomic groups.
The study was an individualised multi-factorial lifestyle intervention study with a control group, Inter99 (1999-2006), Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants in the intervention group (n=6 091) received lifestyle intervention during a five-year period. The control group (n=3 324) was followed by questionnaires. Multilevel regression analyses were used, including interaction term between intervention effect and socioeconomic position (SEP) and analysed separately for men and women. SEP was measured as length of education and employment status and dietary habits were measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire.
Men with a short education improved their dietary habits more (net-change [95% confidence interval]) (0.25 points [-0.01;0.52]) than men with longer education (0.02 points [-0.09;0.14]), (interaction: p=0.02). Furthermore, unemployed women improved their dietary intake more (0.33 points [0.05;0.61]) than employed women (0.01 points [-0.10;0.11]), (interaction: p=0.03). Similar results were found for fruit intake, whereas no significant interactions were found for fish, fat and vegetable intake.
Individualised dietary interventions do not increase and may even decrease or hinder further widening of the social inequalities in health due to unhealthy dietary habits among socially disadvantaged individuals.
PubMed ID
22036837 View in PubMed
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Do gene variants influencing adult adiposity affect birth weight? A population-based study of 24 loci in 4,744 Danish individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138658
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(12):e14190
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ehm A Andersson
Kasper Pilgaard
Charlotta Pisinger
Marie N Harder
Niels Grarup
Kristine Færch
Camilla Sandholt
Pernille Poulsen
Daniel R Witte
Torben Jørgensen
Allan Vaag
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hagedorn Research Institute, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(12):e14190
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Alleles
Birth weight
Body Composition
Body mass index
Denmark
Female
Genetic Variation
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pregnancy
Abstract
Several obesity risk alleles affecting adult adiposity have been identified by the recent wave of genome wide association studies. We aimed to examine the potential effect of these variants on fetal body composition by investigating the variants in relation to birth weight and ponderal index of the newborn.
Midwife records from the Danish State Archives provided information on mother's age, parity, as well as birth weight, birth length and prematurity of the newborn in 4,744 individuals of the population-based Inter99 study. Twenty-four risk alleles showing genome-wide associations with adult BMI and/or waist circumference were genotyped. None of the 24 risk variants tested showed an association with birth weight or ponderal index after correction for multiple testing. Birth weight was divided into three categories low (=10(th) percentile), normal (10(th)-90(th) percentile) and high birth weight (=90th percentile) to allow for non-linear associations. There was no difference in the number of risk alleles between the groups (p?=?0.57). No interactions between each risk allele and birth weight in the prediction of adult BMI were observed. An obesity risk score was created by summing up risk alleles. The risk score did not associate with fetal body composition. Moreover there was no interaction between the risk score and birth weight/ponderal index in the prediction of adult BMI.
24 common variants associated with adult adiposity did not affect or interact with birth weight among Danes suggesting that the effects of these variants predominantly arise in the post-natal life.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21152014 View in PubMed
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The effectiveness of smoking cessation groups offered to hospitalised patients with symptoms of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99104
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Jul;2(3):158-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Anders Borglykke
Charlotta Pisinger
Torben Jørgensen
Hans Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Ndr. Ringvej 57, Building 84/85, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. andbor01@glo.regionh.dk
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Jul;2(3):158-65
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Intervention Studies
Logistic Models
Male
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Probability
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Recurrence
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. Smoking is the leading cause of COPD. Results from randomised trials regarding smoking cessation in hospitalised patients with COPD are few. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of smoking cessation groups (SCG) in patients with COPD admitted to hospital. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-three patients admitted to hospital were assigned to either a control group (n = 102) or an intervention group (n = 121) by matter of vacancy. The smokers in the intervention group were offered participation in an SCG. Smoking status and change in self-reported symptoms were assessed after 1 year. Smoking status was self-reported and verified with carbohemoglobin measurement. Survival and hospital admissions were assessed after 5 years through national registers. RESULTS: Forty-eight patients participated in an SCG. After 1 year, 36 (30%) patients in the intervention group were abstinent compared with 13 (13%) patients in the control group [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.83 (1.40-5.74)]. There was a significant difference between the intervention group and the control group regarding change in self-reported phlegm. There was a non-significant tendency towards better survival in the intervention group (50.4%) compared with the control group (43.1%). After 3 years, the intervention group had a significantly fewer total number of days admitted to hospital and number of days hospitalised with COPD. CONCLUSION: This study shows that an intervention consisting of offering participation in an SCG to chronic patients makes it possible to obtain higher abstinence rates. Furthermore, this intervention showed impact on phlegm, survival and hospital readmissions.
PubMed ID
20298324 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.