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Age at acquisition of Helicobacter pylori in a pediatric Canadian First Nations population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4343
Source
Helicobacter. 2002 Apr;7(2):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Samir K Sinha
Bruce Martin
Michael Sargent
Jospeh P McConnell
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Helicobacter. 2002 Apr;7(2):76-85
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Feces - microbiology
Female
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Hemoglobins
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Occult Blood
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sanitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few data exist regarding the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infections in aboriginal, including the First Nations (Indian) or Inuit (Eskimo) populations of North America. We have previously found 95% of the adults in Wasagamack, a First Nations community in Northeastern Manitoba, Canada, are seropositive for H. pylori. We aimed to determine the age at acquisition of H. pylori among the children of this community, and if any association existed with stool occult blood or demographic factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively enrolled children resident in the Wasagamack First Nation in August 1999. A demographic questionnaire was administered. Stool was collected, frozen and batch analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for H. pylori antigen and for the presence of occult blood. Questionnaire data were analyzed and correlated with the presence or absence of H. pylori. RESULTS: 163 (47%) of the estimated 350 children aged 6 weeks to 12 years, resident in the community were enrolled. Stool was positive for H. pylori in 92 (56%). By the second year of life 67% were positive for H. pylori. The youngest to test positive was 6 weeks old. There was no correlation of a positive H. pylori status with gender, presence of pets, serum Hgb, or stool occult blood. Forty-three percent of H. pylori positive and 24% of H. pylori negative children were
PubMed ID
11966865 View in PubMed
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The anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody assay in a province-wide practice: accurate in identifying cases of Crohn's disease and predicting inflammatory disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171577
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2005 Dec;19(12):717-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Brinderjit Kaila
Kenneth Orr
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2005 Dec;19(12):717-21
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic - analysis
Antibodies, Fungal - analysis
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Child
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - immunology
Diagnosis, Differential
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Saccharomyces cerevisiae - immunology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To determine the utility of the anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA) ELISA test developed in Manitoba in 2001 in a population-wide sample referred from physicians across Manitoba in their investigation of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms.
Patients whose serum was referred for ASCA testing in 2001 and 2002 were eligible for the present study. ELISA was performed by a technologist, blind to patient diagnoses. A single investigator contacted physicians to facilitate chart review. Data collected included demographics, final diagnoses and tests used to substantiate the final diagnosis.
Of 482 subjects identified, 410 charts were available for review and 29 of those were unavailable for follow-up or had incomplete charts. The present study population included Crohn's disease (CD, n=114), ulcerative colitis (n=74), indeterminate colitis (n=31), celiac disease (n=9), irritable bowel syndrome (n=75), other diagnoses (n=33) and no disease (n=45). ASCA had a sensitivity of 37% (95% CI 27.8 to 46.8) and specificity of 97% (95% CI 93.8 to 98.6) for diagnosing CD and an odds ratio for a diagnosis of CD of 18.4 (95% CI 8.2 to 41.3). The 47 ASCA-positive patients included the following diagnoses: CD=39, ulcerative colitis=3, indeterminate colitis=1, celiac disease=3 and no disease=1. The likelihood of having an inflammatory disease if ASCA is positive was nearly 40-fold.
A positive ASCA test using this assay nearly clinches a diagnosis of some form of inflammatory intestinal disease, which is highly likely to be CD. In symptomatic patients, a positive ASCA test should encourage the clinician to pursue further investigations.
PubMed ID
16341311 View in PubMed
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Are perineal and luminal fistulas associated in Crohn's disease? A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167941
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Sep;4(9):1130-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Linda Y Tang
Patricia Rawsthorne
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Sep;4(9):1130-4
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Cutaneous Fistula - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Intestinal Fistula - complications - epidemiology
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Perineum
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Urinary Bladder Fistula - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
We aimed to determine the frequency of fistulizing Crohn's disease (CD) and the relationship between perineal and luminal fistulas.
A population-based retrospective study was conducted by using the University of Manitoba Inflammatory Bowel Disease Research Registry. In 2003 there were 3192 IBD patients, 1595 had (CD), and 398 patients reported stricturing or fistulizing disease. Patients were interviewed and medical records were reviewed for phenotype assessment. Perineal fistulas were defined as those exiting in the perineum or fistulizing to sexual organs. Luminal fistulas were defined as arising from the bowel to organs other than the perineum.
The prevalence of fistulizing CD was at most 22.1%. Of the 398 patients, 280 CD patients were eligible for full phenotype verification. Of these, 50 patients had both perineal and luminal fistulas, 151 had only perineal fistulas, and 79 had only luminal fistulas. Odds ratio (OR) for likelihood of having luminal fistula disease if perineal disease was present was 5.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.40-7.42; P
PubMed ID
16905369 View in PubMed
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Assessing environmental risk factors affecting the inflammatory bowel diseases: a joint workshop of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundations of Canada and the USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156890
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008 Aug;14(8):1139-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. cbernst@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008 Aug;14(8):1139-46
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - epidemiology
Risk factors
United States
PubMed ID
18521909 View in PubMed
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Association between early childhood otitis media and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: an exploratory population-based analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119628
Source
J Pediatr. 2013 Mar;162(3):510-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Souradet Y Shaw
James F Blanchard
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 2013 Mar;162(3):510-4
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine whether a diagnosis of otitis media in the first 5 years of childhood is associated with the development of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
This was a nested case-control analysis of a population-based IBD database in Manitoba, Canada. A total of 294 children with IBD diagnosed between 1989 and 2008 were matched to 2377 controls, based on age, sex, and geographic region. The diagnosis of ottis media was based on physician claims. IBD status was determined based on a validated administrative database definition. Multivariate conditional logistic regression models were used to model the association between otitis media and IBD, adjusted for annual physician visits.
Approximately 5% of the IBD cases and 12% of the controls did not have an otitis media diagnosis before that IBD case date. By age 5 years, 89% of the IBD cases had at least one diagnosis of otitis media, compared with 82% of the controls. In multivariate analyses, compared with cases and controls without an otitis media diagnosis, individuals with an otitis media diagnosis by age 5 years were 2.8-fold more likely to be an IBD case (95% CI, 1.5-5.2; P = .001). This association was detected in stratified models examining Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis separately.
Compared with controls, subjects diagnosed with IBD were more likely to have had at least one early childhood episode of otitis media before their diagnosis. We suspect that otitis media serves as a proxy measure of antibiotic use.
PubMed ID
23084703 View in PubMed
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Association between spring season of birth and Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108177
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Feb;12(2):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Souradet Y Shaw
Zoann Nugent
Laura E Targownik
Harminder Singh
James F Blanchard
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Feb;12(2):277-82
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Seasons
Young Adult
Abstract
As for many complex diseases, the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is higher among individuals born during certain seasons. This difference could arise from seasonal variations in many factors, including exposure to sunlight, antibiotics, or infectious agents. We investigated the relationship between season of birth, early childhood exposure to antibiotics, and incidence of IBD.
We performed a nested case-control analysis using data from the University of Manitoba inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology database. We compared seasons of birth among 11,145 individuals with IBD (cases) and 108,633 controls using conditional logistic regression models. We collected data on use of antibiotics in the first year of life for cases and controls from the Manitoba Drug Program Information Network-a comprehensive database of all prescriptions given to residents of Manitoba since 1995.
Approximately 27.0% of cases were born from April through June, compared with 25.6% of controls (odds ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.12; P = .002). Comparisons made by sex (male vs female) and type of IBD (ulcerative colitis vs Crohn's disease) showed statistical significance only for men with Crohn's disease (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.25; P = .009). At ages 6 months and older, cases and controls born from April through June received a significantly greater number of prescriptions for antibiotics than cases and controls born in other months.
Men with Crohn's disease are more likely to have been born in the months of April through June.
PubMed ID
23924874 View in PubMed
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Association between the use of antibiotics in the first year of life and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140111
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Dec;105(12):2687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Souradet Y Shaw
James F Blanchard
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Dec;105(12):2687-92
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Intestines - microbiology
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The development of commensal flora in infants has been shown to be sensitive to antibiotic use. Altered intestinal flora is thought to contribute to the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an idiopathic chronic condition. We aimed to determine if early use of antibiotics was associated with the development of IBD in childhood.
Nested case-control analysis of the population-based University of Manitoba Inflammatory Bowel Disease Epidemiologic Database was carried out. IBD status was determined from a validated administrative database definition. A total of 36 subjects diagnosed between 1996 and 2008 were matched to 360 controls, on the basis of age, sex, and geographic region. Antibiotic data were drawn from the Manitoba Drug Program Information Network, a comprehensive population-based database of all prescription drugs for all Manitobans dating back to 1995. Antibiotic use in the first year of life was compared between IBD cases and controls.
The mean age at IBD diagnosis was 8.4 years. Twenty-one cases (58%) had one or more antibiotic dispensations in their first year of life compared with 39% of controls. Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 75% of IBD cases. Those receiving one or more dispensations of antibiotics were at 2.9 times the odds (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 7.0) of being an IBD case.
Subjects diagnosed with IBD in childhood are more likely to have used antibiotics in their first year of life.
Notes
Comment In: Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2011 Aug;17(8):1822-321425216
Comment In: Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Dec;105(12):2693-621131935
PubMed ID
20940708 View in PubMed
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A BALANCING VIEW: Dysplasia surveillance in ulcerative colitis--sorting the pro from the con.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178662
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1636-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, 804F-715 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3P4, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1636-7
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - pathology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Colonoscopy - standards - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - pathology
Prevalence
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Risk assessment
Notes
Comment On: Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1633-615330892
Comment On: Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1631-315330891
PubMed ID
15330893 View in PubMed
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Changes in fatigue over 2 years are associated with activity of inflammatory bowel disease and psychological factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114588
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Sep;11(9):1140-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Lesley A Graff
Ian Clara
John R Walker
Lisa Lix
Rachel Carr
Norine Miller
Linda Rogala
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
IBD Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. lgraff@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Sep;11(9):1140-6
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - pathology - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies have identified high levels of fatigue in patients with active or quiescent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but there has been little attention to the long-term effects of fatigue in these patients. We performed a longitudinal study of fatigue in patients with IBD to determine its course and contributing factors.
Data were obtained from participants in the Manitoba IBD Cohort Study (N = 312; 51% with Crohn's disease), a longitudinal population-based study. Symptomatic disease activity was measured every 6 months for 2 years to characterize long-term disease patterns as active, fluctuating, or inactive, based on the validated Manitoba IBD Index. We collected data concurrently on fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), psychological function, and laboratory biomarkers at the point of study entry and 1 and 2 years later.
Of the study participants, 26% had consistently inactive, 29% had fluctuating, and 45% had consistently active disease over the 2-year time period. Mean levels of fatigue were strongly associated with disease activity; participants with consistently inactive disease had the lowest level of fatigue at each time point. Multivariate analyses indicated fatigue levels increased over time regardless of disease pattern (P
PubMed ID
23602816 View in PubMed
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The clustering of other chronic inflammatory diseases in inflammatory bowel disease: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173028
Source
Gastroenterology. 2005 Sep;129(3):827-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Charles N Bernstein
Andre Wajda
James F Blanchard
Author Affiliation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. cbernst@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Gastroenterology. 2005 Sep;129(3):827-36
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Female
Geography
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Pericarditis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psoriasis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We aimed to discern the relative risk for several chronic inflammatory conditions in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease.
We used the population-based University of Manitoba IBD Database that includes longitudinal files on all patients from all health system contacts identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification codes for visit diagnosis. From the provincial database we extracted a control cohort matching the IBD patients 10:1 by age, sex, and geography. We considered a potential comorbid disease to be present if the patient had 5 or more health system contacts for that diagnosis. The comorbid disease period prevalence was analyzed separately for patients with UC and Crohn's disease and a prevalence ratio was calculated comparing the IBD populations with the matched cohort.
There were 8072 cases of IBD from 1984 to 2003, including UC (n = 3879) and Crohn's disease (n = 4193). There was a mean of approximately 16 person-years of coverage for both patients and control patients. Both UC and Crohn's disease patients had a significantly greater likelihood of having arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, psoriasis, and pericarditis than population controls. An increased risk for chronic renal disease and multiple sclerosis was noted in UC but not Crohn's disease patients. The most common nonintestinal comorbidities identified were arthritis and asthma.
The finding of asthma as the most common comorbidity increased in Crohn's disease patients compared with the general population is novel. These may be diseases with common causes or complications of one disease that lead to the presentation with another. Studies such as this should encourage further research into the common triggers in the organ systems that lead to autoimmune diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Gastroenterology. 2005 Sep;129(3):1117-2016143148
PubMed ID
16143122 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.