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Airway symptoms and lung function among male workers in an area polluted from an oil tank explosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267816
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):953-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Stein Håkon Låstad Lygre
Cecilie Svanes
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):953-8
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Explosions
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Petroleum - adverse effects
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory System
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess whether working in an industrial harbor where an oil tank exploded was associated with more airway symptoms and lower lung function in men 1.5 years later.
In a cross-sectional study of 180 men, 18 to 67 years old, airway symptoms and lung function among men who worked in the industrial harbor at the time of the explosion was compared with those of working men with residence more than 20 km away. Regression analyses are adjusted for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, recent infection, and age.
Exposed men had significantly more upper (ORirritated nose = 2.89 [95% confidence interval = 1.31 to 6.37]) and lower (ORdyspnea uphill = 3.79 [95% confidence interval = 1.69 to 8.46]) airway symptoms, and some indication of more reversible airway obstruction than unexposed workers.
Men working in an area with an oil tank explosion had more airway symptoms and indication of more airway obstruction 1.5 years after the event.
PubMed ID
25153304 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway symptoms and lung function in the local population after the oil tank explosion in Gulen, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118172
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Ågot Irgens
Cecilie Svanes
Nils Magerøy
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. jens-tore.granslo@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Explosions
Female
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Spirometry
Abstract
Oil tanks containing a mixture of hydrocarbons, including sulphuric compounds, exploded and caught fire in an industrial harbour. This study assesses airway symptoms and lung function in the nearby population 1½ years after the explosion.
A cross-sectional study included individuals =18 years old. Individuals living 20 km away formed a control group. A questionnaire and spirometry tests were completed by 223 exposed individuals (response rate men 70%, women 75%) and 179 control individuals (response rate men 51%, women 65%). Regression analyses included adjustment for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, infection in the preceding month and age. Analyses of symptoms were also adjusted for stress reactions related to the accident.
Exposed individuals experienced significantly more blocked nose (odds ratio 1.7 [95% confidence interval 1.0, 2.8]), rhinorrhoea (1.6 [1.1, 3.3]), nose irritation (3.4 [2.0, 5.9]), sore throat (3.1 [1.8, 5.5]), morning cough (3.5 [2.0, 5.5]), daily cough (2.2 [1.4, 3.7]), cough >3 months a year (2.9 [1.5, 5.3]) and cough with phlegm (1.9 [1.2, 3.1]) than control individuals. A significantly increasing trend was found for nose symptoms and cough, depending on the proximity of home address to explosion site (daily cough, 3-6km 1.8 [1.0, 3.1],
Notes
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PubMed ID
23234609 View in PubMed
Less detail

A follow-up study of airway symptoms and lung function among residents and workers 5.5 years after an oil tank explosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286887
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2017 Jan 17;17(1):18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2017
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Stein Håkon Låstad Lygre
Cecilie Svanes
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2017 Jan 17;17(1):18
Date
Jan-17-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chemical Hazard Release
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Explosions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oil and Gas Industry
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
Assess if people who lived or worked in an area polluted after an oil tank explosion had persistent respiratory health impairment as compared to a non-exposed population 5.5 years after the event.
A follow-up study 5.5 years after the explosion, 330 persons aged 18-67 years, compared lung function, lung function decline and airway symptoms among exposed persons (residents 20 km away). Also men in the exposed group who had participated in accident related tasks (firefighting or clean-up of pollution) were compared with men who did not. Data were analysed using Poisson regression, adjusted for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy and age.
Exposed men who had participated in accident related tasks had higher prevalence of lower airway symptoms after 5.5 years (n?=?24 [73%]) than non-exposed men (28 [48%]), (adjusted relative risk 1.51 [95% confidence interval 1.07, 2.14]). Among men who participated in accident related tasks FEV1 decline was 48 mL per year, and 12 mL among men who did not (adjusted difference -34 mL per year [-67 mL, -1 mL]), and at follow-up FEV1/FVC ratio was 71.4 and 74.2% respectively, (adjusted difference -3.0% [-6.0, 0.0%]).
Residents and workers had more airway symptoms and impaired lung function 5.5 years after an oil tank explosion, most significant for a group of men engaged in firefighting and clean-up of pollution after the accident. Public health authorities should be aware of long-term consequences after such accidents.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28095831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of anxiety and depression on respiratory symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265060
Source
Respir Med. 2014 Nov;108(11):1594-600
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Mai Leander
Erik Lampa
Anna Rask-Andersen
Karl Franklin
Thorarinn Gislason
Anna Oudin
Cecilie Svanes
Kjell Torén
Christer Janson
Source
Respir Med. 2014 Nov;108(11):1594-600
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Asthma - epidemiology - psychology
Bronchial Provocation Tests - methods
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychophysiology
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Spirometry - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Psychological factors such as anxiety and depression are prevalent in patients with asthma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between respiratory symptoms and psychological status and to estimate the importance of psychological status in comparison with other factors that are known to be associated with respiratory symptoms. This study included 2270 subjects aged 20-44 (52% female) from Sweden, Iceland, and Norway. Each participant underwent a clinical interview including questions on respiratory symptoms. Spirometry and methacholine challenge were performed. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Eighty-two percent of the subjects reported no anxiety or depression whatsoever, 11% reported anxiety, 2.5% depression and 4% reported both anxiety and depression. All respiratory symptoms, such as wheezing, breathlessness and nightly symptoms, were more common, at a statistically significant level, in participants who had depression and anxiety, even after adjusting for confounders (ORs 1.33-1.94). The HADS score was the most important determinant for nightly symptoms and attacks of breathlessness when at rest whereas bronchial responsiveness was the most important determinant for wheezing, and breathlessness when wheezing. The probability of respiratory symptoms related to HADS score increased with increasing HADS score for all respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, there is a strong association between respiratory symptoms and psychological status. There is therefore a need for interventional studies designed to improve depression and anxiety in patients with respiratory symptoms.
PubMed ID
25282543 View in PubMed
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Periodontal health status and lung function in two Norwegian cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290207
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(1):e0191410
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Antonio Manuel Pérez Barrionuevo
Francisco Gómez Real
Jannicke Igland
Ane Johannessen
Ernst Omenaas
Karl A Franklin
Laura Pérez Barrionuevo
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Cecilie Svanes
Randi Jacobsen Bertelsen
Author Affiliation
Centre for International Health, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(1):e0191410
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - physiopathology
Periodontal Index
Vital Capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
The oral cavity is united with the airways, and thus poor oral health may affect respiratory health. However, data on the interaction of periodontal and respiratory health is limited. We aimed to evaluate whether periodontal health status, assessed by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI), was related to lung function among young and middle-aged adults in two Norwegian cohorts.
Periodontal health status and lung function were measured among 656 participants in the Norwegian part of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECHRS III) and the RHINESSA offspring study. Each participant was given a CPI-index from 0 to 4 where higher values reflect poorer periodontal status. The association between CPI and lung function was estimated with linear regression adjusting for age, gender, smoking, body mass index, exercise, education, use of antibiotics, inhaled medication and corrected for clustering within families.
Participants with CPI 3-4 had significantly lower FEV1/FVC ratio compared to participants with CPI 0, b (95% CI) = -0.032 (-0.055, -0.009). Poorer periodontal health was associated with a significant decrease in the FEV1/FVC ratio with an adjusted regression coefficient for linear trend b (95% CI) = -0.009 (-0.015, -0.004) per unit increase in CPI. This negative association remained when excluding asthmatics and smokers (-0.014 (-0.022, -0,006)).
Poorer periodontal health was associated with increasing airways obstruction in a relatively young, healthy population. The oral cavity is united with the airways and our findings indicate an opportunity to influence respiratory health by improving oral health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29351551 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predictors of smoking cessation: A longitudinal study in a large cohort of smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294556
Source
Respir Med. 2017 Nov; 132:164-169
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Mathias Holm
Linus Schiöler
Eva Andersson
Bertil Forsberg
Thorarinn Gislason
Christer Janson
Rain Jogi
Vivi Schlünssen
Cecilie Svanes
Kjell Torén
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: mathias.holm@amm.gu.se.
Source
Respir Med. 2017 Nov; 132:164-169
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Bronchitis, Chronic - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Iceland - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Sounds
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
There are few studies on predictors of smoking cessation in general populations. We studied the smoking cessation rate in relation to several potential predictors, with special focus on respiratory and cardiovascular disease.
Smokers (n = 4636) from seven centres in Northern Europe, born between 1945 and 1973, who answered a questionnaire in 1999-2001 (the RHINE study) were followed up with a new questionnaire in 2010-2012. Altogether 2564 answered the questionnaire and provided complete data on smoking. Cox regression analyses were performed to calculate hazard ratios (HRs).
A total of 999 subjects (39%) stopped smoking during the study period. The smoking cessation rate was 44.9/1000 person-years. Smoking cessation was more common with increasing age, higher education and fewer years of smoking. Asthma, wheeze, hay fever, chronic bronchitis, diabetes and hypertension did not significantly predict smoking cessation, but smokers hospitalized for ischaemic heart disease during the study period were more prone to stopping smoking (HR 3.75 [2.62-5.37]).
Successful smoking cessation is common in middle-aged smokers, and is associated with few smoking years and higher education. A diagnosis of respiratory disease does not appear to motivate people to quit smoking, nor do known cardiovascular risk factors; however, an acute episode of ischaemic heart disease encouraged smoking cessation in our study population.
PubMed ID
29229092 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of, and work-related risk factors for, hand eczema in a Norwegian general population (The HUNT Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291759
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2017 Oct; 77(4):214-223
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Hilde K Vindenes
Cecilie Svanes
Stein H L Lygre
Bjørg-Eli Hollund
Arnulf Langhammer
Randi J Bertelsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2017 Oct; 77(4):214-223
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Dermatitis, Contact - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - etiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
Chemical exposures at work and at home may cause hand eczema. However, this has been scarcely described for Norway.
To investigate the prevalence of, and occupational risk factors for, hand eczema in Norway.
Among 50?805 respondents (aged =20?years) to the third Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT3), 5757 persons reported ever having hand eczema, and 4206 answered a hand eczema questionnaire.
The lifetime prevalences of hand eczema were 8.4% in men and 13.8% in women (p?
PubMed ID
28449354 View in PubMed
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Trends in peptic ulcer morbidity and mortality in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189126
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Jul;55(7):681-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Hildur Thors
Cecilie Svanes
Bjarni Thjodleifsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, National University Hospital, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Jul;55(7):681-6
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Peptic Ulcer - complications - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A cohort pattern has been demonstrated for ulcer mortality and perforation, pointing to a role of early life factors, while only a period-related decrease has been observed in elective ulcer surgery, which reflects uncomplicated ulcer. The aim of this article was to study whether the susceptibility to peptic ulcer disease is determined early in life, as reflected in a cohort pattern consistent for all ulcer manifestations. The subjects were all patients treated surgically for peptic ulcer (perforations 1962-1990; bleedings 1971-1990; elective surgery 1971-1990) and all deaths from peptic ulcer (perforations and other ulcer deaths 1951-1989) in Iceland. Age-specific incidence and mortality were analyzed graphically by year of birth (cohort) and by year of event (period). The effects of cohort and period on incidence and mortality were analyzed by Poisson regression. Ulcer perforation and bleeding, operative incidence, and mortality, showed a rise and subsequent fall in successive generations, with the highest risks observed in the subjects born after the turn of the 20(th) century. This was confirmed by statistical analyses showing highly significant cohort effects (P
PubMed ID
12160916 View in PubMed
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Validation of maternal reported pregnancy and birth characteristics against the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285927
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0181794
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Svein Magne Skulstad
Jannicke Igland
Ane Johannessen
Randi Jacobsen Bertelsen
Marianne Lønnebotn
Ernst Reidar Omenaas
Cecilie Svanes
Francisco Gomez Real
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0181794
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Parturition
Pregnancy
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Abstract
Studies using mothers' self-reported information on birth and pregnancy characteristics are common, but the validity of such data is uncertain. We evaluated questionnaire data from the RHINE III study on reproductive health provided by 715 mothers from Bergen, Norway, about their 1629 births between 1967 and 2010, using the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN) as gold standard. Validity of dichotomous variables (gender, preterm birth [42 weeks' gestation], induction of labour, forceps delivery, vacuum delivery, caesarean section, were assessed by sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) and Cohen's kappa. Paired t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plots were used to validate birthweight, stratified by mother's level of education, parity, birth year and child's asthma status. Child's gender and caesarean section showed high degree of validity (kappa = 0.99, sensitivity and specificity 100%). Instrumental delivery and extremely preterm birth showed good agreement with sensitivity 75-92%. Preterm birth and induction of labour showed moderate agreement. Post-term delivery was poorly reported. The validity appeared to be independent of recall time over 45 years, and of the child's asthma status. Maternally reported birth and pregnancy information is feasible and cheap, showed high validity for important birth and pregnancy parameters, and showed similar risk-associations compared to registry data.
Notes
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