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Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277368
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279894
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. Objective The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. Design The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Results Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity. Conclusion Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
PubMed ID
28156401 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289285
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF, Karasjok, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Norway
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294377
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299332
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Violence - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child-rearing in an indigenous Sami population in Norway: a cross-cultural comparison of parental attitudes and expectations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30452
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Feb;45(1):67-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Cecilie Javo
John A Rønning
Sonja Heyerdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Tromsø, Norway. javo@arcticnet.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Feb;45(1):67-78
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Rearing - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Semi-structured interviews of 76 Sami mothers and 58 Sami fathers, and 86 Norwegian mothers and 58 Norwegian fathers of four-year olds, revealed consistent cross-cultural differences in parenting. ANCOVA results showed that parental permissiveness was higher in the Sami group. Moreover, the effect of ethnicity was different for boys and girls (mothers' reports). Co-sleeping and self-regulation of food and sleep were commonly practiced in the Sami, but not in the Norwegian families. Sami children were more socially independent than their Norwegian peers. Indirect or internal types of control were used more by Sami parents, and they were less tolerant of child aggression, in the form of temper tantrums and displays of jealousy. These patterns are similar to those found in other indigenous cultures in the circumpolar region. The results are discussed with reference to the Individualism-Collectivism dimension. The study challenges the Individualism-Collectivism construct for apparently confounding the individualism common in European liberalism with the individual autonomy commonly encountered among hunting-gathering peoples.
PubMed ID
15016281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emotional, physical and sexual violence among Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: The SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262599
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May 12;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-2015
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Cecilie Javo
Berit Schei
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May 12;
Date
May-12-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To assess the prevalence and investigate ethnic differences of emotional, physical and sexual violence among a population of both Sami and non-Sami in Norway.
Our study was based on the SAMINOR 2 study, a population-based survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Central and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,296 participants: 2197 (19.4%) Sami respondents and 9099 (80.6 %) non-Sami respondents.
Almost half of the Sami female respondents and one-third of the non-Sami female respondents reported any violence (any lifetime experience of violence). Sami women were more likely to report emotional, physical and sexual violence than non-Sami women. More than one-third of the Sami men compared with less than a quarter of non-Sami men reported having experienced any violence in their life. Sami men were more likely to report emotional and physical violence than non-Sami men. However, ethnicity was not significantly different regarding sexual violence experienced among men. Violence was typically reported to have occurred in childhood. Sami participants were more likely to report having experienced violence in the past 12 months. For all types of violence, the perpetrator was typically known to the victim.
Regardless of gender, Sami respondents were more likely to report interpersonal violence. The prevalence of any violence was substantial in both ethnic groups and for both genders; it was highest among Sami women.
PubMed ID
25969164 View in PubMed
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Foreign doctors in Norwegian psychiatry – is there a need for a mentoring scheme?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267179
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Jun 30;135(12-13):1133-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2015
Author
Morten Sandbu
Anne Kamps
Valjbona Preljevic
Cecilie Javo
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Jun 30;135(12-13):1133-7
Date
Jun-30-2015
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Focus Groups
Foreign Medical Graduates - psychology
Humans
Mentors
Norway
Physicians - psychology
Psychiatry - education - organization & administration
Abstract
In line with other Western countries, the number of foreign doctors in Norway has greatly increased in recent years. Inadequate language skills and cultural differences may give rise to challenges. The objective of this study was to investigate the views of Norwegian specialty registrars in psychiatry with regard to a mentoring scheme for foreign doctors and how such a support scheme ought to be designed.
Data were collected in focus-group interviews with specialty registrars in psychiatry. Altogether 24 Norwegian and 16 foreign doctors participated in a total of five focus groups. Thematic analysis was used as methodology.
One consistent finding pertained to the differing views on the need for a mentoring scheme among the Norwegian and foreign doctors respectively. The foreign doctors perceived few problems in terms of language and culture, while their Norwegian colleagues had occasionally experienced considerable problems in this respect. Moreover, obstacles in terms of attitude to a mentoring scheme were revealed among the foreign doctors, as well as differing opinions regarding the organisation of such a scheme, especially in terms of its voluntariness and having peers as mentors (horizontal organisation) versus having superiors as mentors (vertical organisation).
The differences in attitude to a mentoring scheme are partly caused by perception of the problem's extent and partly by varying norms and values among foreign and Norwegian doctors respectively. We propose that various forms of mentoring scheme be tested in a pilot project, in which the foreign doctors are actively involved.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Jun 30;135(12-13):110426130529
PubMed ID
26130546 View in PubMed
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Opening up mental health service delivery to cultural diversity: current situation, development and examples from three northern European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112570
Source
Adv Psychosom Med. 2013;33:40-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sofie Bäärnhielm
Cecilie Jávo
Mike-Oliver Mösko
Author Affiliation
Transcultural Centre, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Adv Psychosom Med. 2013;33:40-55
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - methods - standards
Ethnic Groups
Germany - epidemiology
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Mental Health - ethnology
Mental Health Services - standards - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Quality Improvement
Refugees - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
There are inequalities in health among migrants and local populations in Europe. Due to migration, Germany, Norway and Sweden have become ethnic culturally diverse nations. There are barriers to mental health care access for refugees, migrants and minorities, and problems with quality of culturally sensitive care in the three countries. This is despite tax-funded health care systems based on equity in service provision. There is a need to develop culturally sensitive mental health services that respond to the increasing diversity of the populations. In this chapter, we will take a closer look at cultural diversity in the countries in question, discuss challenges and give examples of current work to open up mental health services to cultural diversity. The German example will focus on the movement of Interkulturelle Öffnung (cross-cultural opening of the health care system) and work on creating national guidelines and quality standards. From Norway, the work of the National Centre for Mental Health for the indigenous Sámi population will be presented. The Swedish example will focus on the work carried out by the Transcultural Centre. The latter is a competence centre supporting development of culturally sensitive care as an integrated part of the regional health and mental health care system in Stockholm. Finally, the relevance of mental health care for a culturally diverse population, as a part of the larger social project of building tolerant multicultural societies, will be discussed.
PubMed ID
23816862 View in PubMed
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Parental values and ethnic identity in indigenous Sami families: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31002
Source
Fam Process. 2003;42(1):151-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Cecilie Javo
Richard Alapack
Sonja Heyerdahl
John A Rønning
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Tromsø. javo@arcticnet.no
Source
Fam Process. 2003;42(1):151-64
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Rearing
Child, Preschool
Cultural Characteristics
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Values
Abstract
The qualitative study reported in this article is part of a larger multimethod investigation of child-rearing practices and child-behavior problems in indigenous Sami and majority Norwegian populations in the Sami core area in Northern Norway. In the primary quantitative study we found significant ethnic differences between Sami and Norwegian parents in various areas of child rearing and family structure. Seeking the deeper cultural meaning underlying the parental practices and attitudes that had emerged in the indigenous Sami group, we performed additional indepth interviews. Four parents, selected from the sample of 134 Sami parents, served as subjects. Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method was used. Data analysis of the interviews identified seven key consitituents of Sami child rearing, which in their interrelationships formed a common structure that constitutes the results of this study. These constituents were: (1) Independence, (2) Hardiness, (3) Autonomy, (4) Closeness/Love, (5) Sami Language, (6) Sami Traditions, and (7) Extended Family. The first four constituents are constituents pertaining to child-rearing values, while the latter three are contextual constituents, related to the promotion of ethnic identity. The study discusses the contemporary dilemmas and challenges that face Sami families in raising their children. It highlights the phenomenon of cultural transition in minority families as an important topic in family research.
PubMed ID
12698605 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.