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A 32-year longitudinal study of alcohol consumption in Swedish women: Reduced risk of myocardial infarction but increased risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275258
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dominique Hange
Jóhann A Sigurdsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Valter Sundh
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Beer
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess associations between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the 32-year incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, as well as mortality, in a middle-aged female population.
Prospective study.
Gothenburg, Sweden, population about 430 000.
Representative sample of a general population of women (1462 in total) aged 38 to 60 years in 1968-1969, followed up to the ages of 70 to 92 years in 2000-2001.
Associations between alcohol intake and later risk of mortality and morbidity from myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, studied longitudinally.
During the follow-up period, 185 women developed myocardial infarction, 162 developed stroke, 160 women became diabetic, and 345 developed cancer. Women who drank beer had a 30% lower risk (hazards ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.95) of developing myocardial infarcion and almost half the risk (HR 0.51 CI 0.33-0.80). A significant association between increased risk of death from cancer and high spirits consumption was also shown (hazards ratio [HR] 1.47, CI 1.06-2.05).
Women with moderate consumption of beer had a reduced risk of developing myocardial infarction. High spirits consumption was associated with increased risk of cancer mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194171 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake among women and its relationship to diabetes incidence and all-cause mortality: the 32-year follow-up of a population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9133
Source
Diabetes Care. 2005 Sep;28(9):2230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Leif Lapidus
Calle Bengtsson
Elisabet Bergfors
Cecilia Björkelund
Fredrik Spak
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Uni, Göteborg University, Box 454 S-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. leif.lapidus@swipnet.se
Source
Diabetes Care. 2005 Sep;28(9):2230-5
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Physical Fitness
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to explore the predictive value of women's alcohol habits in relation to incidence of diabetes and all-cause mortality. Special attention was paid to potential confounding factors such as age, heredity, education, socioeconomic group, physical inactivity, smoking, blood pressure, serum lipids, and, in particular, obesity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A longitudinal population study consisting of a representative sample of 1,462 women aged 38-60 started in Göteborg, Sweden, in 1968-1969 monitoring for diabetes and mortality over 32 years. RESULTS: Alcohol intake, expressed as intake of wine, hard liquor, or total grams of alcohol, was significantly negatively associated to 32-year diabetes incidence independent of age. However, the apparently protective effect of the alcohol variables was attenuated when BMI was included as a covariate. The inverse relationship between wine intake and diabetes did not remain after adjustment for physical activity or socioeconomic group. Beer and wine intake were significantly negatively associated to mortality. Increase of alcohol intake between the examination in 1968-1969 and 1980-1981 was significantly inversely related to the mortality between 1980-1981 and 2000-2001 and independent of all covariates. No relationship was observed between an increase in alcohol intake and diabetes incidence. However, after adjustment for age, family history, and basal alcohol consumption altogether, a significant inverse relationship was observed between increase of alcohol and diabetes incidence. CONCLUSIONS: The initially significant inverse associations observed between alcohol and diabetes as well as mortality were dependent on a number of confounding factors, of which BMI seems to be the most important.
PubMed ID
16123495 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression in obese and normal-weight individuals with diabetes type 2: a gender perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129718
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Jun;26(2):349-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Irene Svenningsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Bertil Marklund
Birgitta Gedda
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. irene.svenningsson@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Jun;26(2):349-54
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety - complications
Depression - complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Obesity is a problem that is increasing worldwide, leading to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Depression is more common among individuals with diabetes, and they are more likely than non-diabetic individuals to experience emotional problems. People with both T2DM and obesity bear an additional emotional burden, which affects their quality of life.
To describe the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression in groups of obese and normal-weight individuals with T2DM who are undergoing primary care and to investigate possible differences between the groups and between genders.
Three hundred and thirty-nine patients with T2DM from nine primary-care centres participated in a cross-sectional study (n = 180 + 159). The response rate was 67%. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Beck Depression Inventory - second edition (BDI-II) were employed to estimate the patients' symptoms of depression and anxiety.
An association between T2DM, obesity and depression was observed in both genders. More than one in three women and one in five men with T2DM and obesity exhibited symptoms of anxiety or depression. In the normal-weight group, the females presented more symptoms of anxiety than did their male counterparts.
In primary healthcare, the fact that both obese men and women with T2DM are at increased risk of anxiety and depression is an important finding, which must be recognised and considered in the course of primary healthcare consultations. Meeting the unique needs of each individual requires an understanding of both laboratory data and the individual's emotional status.
PubMed ID
22077658 View in PubMed
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Association between periodontal disease and ischemic heart disease among Swedish women: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151946
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(4):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ulrika Stenman
Anette Wennström
Margareta Ahlqwist
Calle Bengtsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Lauren Lissner
Magnus Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Ulrika.Stenman@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(4):193-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Chronic Periodontitis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gingival Pocket - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Personal Satisfaction
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the relationship between chronic periodontitis and ischemic heart disease (IHD).
A cross-section of women aged 38 to 84 years were examined in 1992-93 (analysis based on n=1056). Medical and dental examinations were included in the analysis specifically with regard to IHD and periodontitis. Other well-known risk factors for IHD were used as covariates in multivariable statistical analysis.
Among the dentate women in this study (n=847), 74 had IHD and 773 did not. There was no statistically significant difference between numbers of pathological gingival pockets between these groups (58.1% had one or more pathological pockets in the IHD group compared to 57.6% in the non-IHD group). Bivariate analysis of dentate individuals showed significant associations between IHD and number of missing teeth, age, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, life satisfaction, hypertension, and levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. However, in the final multivariable logistic regression model, with the exception of age, only number of teeth (
PubMed ID
19301159 View in PubMed
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Associations between women's subjective perceptions of daily occupations and life satisfaction, and the role of perceived control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129413
Source
Aust Occup Ther J. 2011 Dec;58(6):397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Carita Håkansson
Cecilia Björkelund
Mona Eklund
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. carita.hakansson@hhj.hj.se
Source
Aust Occup Ther J. 2011 Dec;58(6):397-404
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Perception
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
More knowledge is needed about the role of perceived control in the associations between different perceptions of daily occupations and positive health outcomes. The aim was to explore the associations between different subjective perceptions of daily occupations, in terms of occupational balance, occupational meaning, occupational value and satisfaction with occupations, and life satisfaction, and the role of perceived control in those associations.
A questionnaire including questions about perceptions of daily occupations, perceived control and life satisfaction were answered by a random sample of 488 middle-aged Swedish women. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to test the associations between perceptions of daily occupations and life satisfaction, and the role of perceived control.
After adjustments for perceived control women who perceived a high level of satisfaction with work and leisure, occupational balance, occupational meaning and occupational value perceived greater life satisfaction than the other women. Perceived control was not significant in the model.
It seems that occupational balance and occupational meaning were pivotal for the women's life satisfaction, but satisfaction with work and leisure, as well as perceived occupational value, was also of importance. The assumption that perceived control would have a role in the association between perceptions of occupations and life satisfaction was not confirmed.
The results indicate that occupational therapists need to focus on occupational balance, occupational meaning, occupational value and satisfaction with work and leisure to promote positive health outcomes, in terms of life satisfaction, when working with middle-aged female clients.
PubMed ID
22111641 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure components and changes in relation to white matter lesions: a 32-year prospective population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150631
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Jul;54(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Xinxin Guo
Leonardo Pantoni
Michela Simoni
Calle Bengtsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Lauren Lissner
Deborah Gustafson
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. xinxin.guo@neuro.gu.se
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Jul;54(1):57-62
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Brain - pathology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the long-term effect of high blood pressure (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure) on white matter lesions and to study changes in different blood pressure components in relation to white matter lesions. A representative population of women was examined in 1968 and re-examined in 1974, 1980, 1992, and 2000. The presence and severity of white matter lesions on computed tomography were rated by a visual rating scale in 1992 and 2000 in 539 women. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured at all of the examinations. We found that presence and severity of white matter lesions in 1992/2000 were associated with higher diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure at each examination but not with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. Odds ratios (95% CIs) for the presence of white matter lesions per 10-mm Hg increase in diastolic pressure were 1.4 (1.0 to 1.9) in 1968, 1.3 (1.0 to 1.8) in 1974, 1.4 (1.1 to 1.9) in 1980, and 1.3 (1.0 to 1.6) in 1992 after adjustment for confounders. The presence of white matter lesions was also associated with a 24-year increase in diastolic pressure (>10 mm Hg), systolic pressure (>40 mm Hg), pulse pressure (>24 mm Hg), and mean arterial pressure (>6 mm Hg; odds ratios [95% CIs]: 2.6 [1.3 to 5.1] for diastolic pressure; 2.0 [1.2 to 3.4] for systolic pressure; 1.8 [1.1 to 2.7] for pulse pressure; and 2.2 [1.4 to 3.4] for mean arterial pressure). Our findings suggest that lowering high diastolic blood pressure and preventing large increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressures may have a protective effect on white matter lesions.
PubMed ID
19487586 View in PubMed
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Can the relation between tooth loss and chronic disease be explained by socio-economic status? A 24-year follow-up from the population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16991
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(3):229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Claudia Cabrera
Magnus Hakeberg
Margareta Ahlqwist
Hans Wedel
Cecilia Björkelund
Calle Bengtsson
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Jönköping University, Sweden. claudia.cabrera@allmed.gu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(3):229-36
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between number of missing teeth and all cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality as well as morbidity and to explore whether socio-economic factors mediate this association. An ongoing prospective cohort study of 1462 Swedish women included a dental survey in 1968/69 with follow-up until 1992/93. The dental examination included a panoramic radiographic survey and a questionnaire. Number of missing teeth at baseline was analysed in a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate time to mortality and morbidity. Number of missing teeth, independently of socio-economic status variables (the husband's occupational category, combined income, and education) was associated with increased all cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality respectively (relative risk (RR): 1.36; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.18-1.58) and (RR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.15-1.85 per 10 missing teeth), but no associations were found for cancer mortality (RR: 1.18; 95% CI: 0.91-1.52). The relation between poor oral health and future cardiovascular disease could not be explained by measures of socio-economic status in this study.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(3):203-415921035
PubMed ID
15921040 View in PubMed
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Care of elderly lower limb amputees, as described in medical and nursing records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46952
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Dec;19(4):337-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Siv Bäck-Pettersson
Cecilia Björkelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden. siv.back-petersson@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Dec;19(4):337-43
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amputation - mortality - nursing - statistics & numerical data
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Leg
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterize elderly lower limb amputees and explore problems/requirements inherent in their care. A retrospective study of medical and nursing records of patients who had undergone lower limb amputation (LLA) at Uddevalla General Hospital in 1997 was conducted. Demographic data were compared with those from a comparable regional health care district. Hospitalization, rehabilitation and nursing-related data related to subjects alive after 6 months were compared with data concerning those deceased during hospital stay and within 6 months after amputation. During the defined period, the study population consisted of 45 patients aged 60 and above. Fifty-six percent were men, with a mean age of 81.6. Eight patients died in the hospital post-amputation and five died within 6 months of surgery. The aetiology of the diagnosis leading to the LLA was cardiovascular disease in the majority of cases. The most common amputation level was below the knee. LLA patients were reported to have major problems maintaining physical and mental functions, markedly deteriorated general health status and severe pain problems. LLA patients require well functioning and qualified care and rehabilitation. The patients surviving after 6 months had permanent problems in the area of nutrition, elimination, skin ulceration, sleep, pain and pain alleviation. The patients who died during the hospital stay had problems in all these areas. With increasing shorter stays in hospital and decreasing resources in primary and municipal care, there is a risk that these patients' needs and requirements for professional care might be underestimated and thus remain unfulfilled.
PubMed ID
16324057 View in PubMed
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Challenging heteronormativity in the consultation: a focus group study among general practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71170
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Dec;21(4):205-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Anna Westerståhl
Cecilia Björkelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. anna.westerstahl@allmed.gu.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Dec;21(4):205-8
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Culture
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Research
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family - psychology - standards
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To reflect on and further understand mechanisms of heteronormativity in the consultation, with special focus on the relative invisibility of lesbian women. DESIGN: Tape-recorded focus group interviews transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative methods. SETTING: General practitioners (GPs) from the city of Göteborg, Sweden, who had formerly answered a postal questionnaire about lesbian women in the consultation, were invited to take part in subsequent focus groups. SUBJECTS: Ten GPs from the questionnaire who accepted the invitation and volunteered to participate in focus groups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A discourse analytical approach using interaction regarding consensus and disagreement between informants in creating major and minor themes. RESULTS: Consultation skills were forwarded as a major tool in receiving optimal information from patients. However, traditional concepts of family and sexuality restricted information and hampered an accepting attitude. Bringing up issues of sexual identity/orientation was left to the lesbian patient and strongly related to her reason for attending. CONCLUSION: Consultation skills are a useful but not sufficient means of making lesbian women visible in the doctor-patient relationship. Doctors also need to transcend traditional concepts of family and sexuality and reflect on what is a relevant issue from the patient's perspective.
PubMed ID
14695069 View in PubMed
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Clinical effectiveness of care managers in collaborative care for patients with depression in Swedish primary health care: a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300218
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2018 02 09; 19(1):28
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-09-2018
Author
Cecilia Björkelund
Irene Svenningsson
Dominique Hange
Camilla Udo
Eva-Lisa Petersson
Nashmil Ariai
Shabnam Nejati
Catrin Wessman
Carl Wikberg
Malin André
Lars Wallin
Jeanette Westman
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Cecilia.bjorkelund@allmed.gu.se.
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2018 02 09; 19(1):28
Date
02-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Case Management
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Management - organization & administration
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care
Remission Induction
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Depression is one of the leading causes of disability and affects 10-15% of the population. The majority of people with depressive symptoms seek care and are treated in primary care. Evidence internationally for high quality care supports collaborative care with a care manager. Our aim was to study clinical effectiveness of a care manager intervention in management of primary care patients with depression in Sweden.
In a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial 23 primary care centers (PCCs), urban and rural, included patients aged =?18 years with a new (
PubMed ID
29426288 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.