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Correlates of depressive and anxiety disorders among young Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172073
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;50(10):620-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Cat Tuong Nguyen
Louise Fournier
Lise Bergeron
Pasquale Roberge
Geneviève Barrette
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;50(10):620-8
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Demography
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The current study presents data on the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in the Canadian population aged between 15 and 24 years and examines their potential correlates.
The study is based on the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health and Well-Being (CCHS 1.2). This survey was administered to a representative sample of 36,984 Canadians. A subsample of 5673 Canadians aged between 15 and 24 years was available for the analyses. We used descriptive analyses to calculate lifetime and 12-month prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders, and we used logistic regressions to measure odds ratios.
Among Canadian youths, 10.2% had suffered from depressive disorders during their lifetime, whereas 12.1% had suffered from anxiety disorders. For 12-month prevalence, the rates were 6.4% and 6.5% for depressive and anxiety disorders, respectively. Depressive disorders were more frequent among youth aged 20 to 24 years and among those no longer in school. Both disorders were more common among women and people under extreme stress.
The prevalence rates found are comparable with other studies, and most of the correlates are concordant with the literature. Results indicate that there is a turning point for depression between late adolescence and adulthood that could be crucial for intervention planning.
PubMed ID
16276853 View in PubMed
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Depressive disorders among young Canadians: associated factors of continuity and discontinuity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161102
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):326-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cat Tuong Nguyen
Louise Fournier
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Santé, Montreal, Quebec. cat.tuong.nguyen@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):326-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare potential risk factors of depressive disorders among young Canadians (aged 15-24) to those of older age groups (25-34 and 35-44) and examine the contribution of individual and contextual factors in the continuity and discontinuity of depression.
Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey--Cycle 1.2 were analyzed to examine the associations between individual, familial, social and environmental factors and the continuity or discontinuity of depressive disorders among young Canadians. The sample consisted of 5,673 Canadians aged 15-24, 5,830 aged 25-34 and 7,830 aged 35-44. Youths were also categorized according to the type of cases: non-case, new case, case in remission or long-lasting case.
Among Canadian youth, 10.2% had suffered from depression during their lifetime. Social support was the only factor distinguishing the youngest age group from the others regarding depression. Compared to older age groups, stress levels were notably higher for young people. The combination of social network, social support and stress levels strongly distinguished between the long-term cases and the non-cases among youths. Weak feeling of community cohesion was also related to new cases of depression and could contribute to their beginnings.
Potential targets for preventive measures lie in the contextual and social influences of youth; particularly what impacts stress levels, social support and social networks. Studying processes of continuity and discontinuity contribute to identifying distinct profiles of onset, recurrence or remission of depression that may point to avenues for prevention and early intervention.
PubMed ID
17896746 View in PubMed
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Guideline concordance of treatment for depressive disorders in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154588
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 May;44(5):385-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Arnaud Duhoux
Louise Fournier
Cat Tuong Nguyen
Pasquale Roberge
Rachelle Beveridge
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada. arnaud.duhoux@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 May;44(5):385-92
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Young Adult
Abstract
Depression is one of the most prevalent mental health problems worldwide with considerable social and economic burdens. While practice guidelines exist, their adherence is inconsistent in clinical practice.
To provide up-to-date national estimates of the adequacy of treatment received by Canadians having suffered a major depressive disorder (MDD) and examine factors associated with this adequacy. To evaluate the impact of different definitions of guideline-concordant treatment on the results.
Data were drawn from the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 1.2: Mental Health and Well-Being (CCHS 1.2), a nationally representative survey conducted in 2002 and targetting persons aged 15 years or older living in private dwellings. In order to calculate the prevalence of treatment adequacy, we used a sample of 1,563 individuals meeting the criteria for MDD in the 12 months preceding the survey. A subset of 831 subjects who reported having used health services for mental health purposes at least once during that time served to identify the factors associated with treatment adequacy.
Four definitions of minimally adequate treatment were considered and covariates were selected according to a well-known behavioral model. The analyses consisted of prevalence estimates and logistic regression models.
Among selected subjects, 55% received guideline-concordant treatment according to the Canadian guidelines. Inadequacy was more prevalent in rural settings, for less complex cases, and in the general medical sector. Depending on the definition, prevalence of guideline-concordant treatment ranged between 48 and 71%, and factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment were mainly need factors and sector of care.
A large proportion of people with a depressive disorder do not receive minimally adequate treatment. Improved access to and quality of treatment is required, especially in primary care settings.
PubMed ID
18946624 View in PubMed
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Mental health service use and treatment adequacy for anxiety disorders in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144971
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Apr;46(4):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Pasquale Roberge
Louise Fournier
Arnaud Duhoux
Cat Tuong Nguyen
Mirrian Smolders
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada. pasquale.roberge@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Apr;46(4):321-30
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined mental health service use, minimal standards of treatment adequacy and correlates of service use and treatment adequacy for anxiety disorders in Canada.
Data were drawn from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health and Well-Being (CCHS 1.2, 2002). Respondents (n = 1,803) met criteria for panic disorder, agoraphobia and/or social phobia in the past 12 months. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate patterns of associations between respondent characteristics, service use and treatment adequacy.
The prevalence of service use for mental health problems in the past 12 months was approximately 36.9% among respondents with anxiety disorders. The rates of minimal standards of treatment adequacy ranged from 36.8% among those consulting exclusively in primary care to 51.5% among those consulting exclusively in specialised mental health services, and reached 79.5% for respondents consulting healthcare professionals in both sectors of care. Correlates of treatment adequacy included age, education level, marital status, urbanicity medical insurance, acceptability of care, comorbid mental disorders and limitations of activities.
These findings emphasize the need to improve the access to mental health services and the quality of care for individuals with anxiety disorders in primary care.
PubMed ID
20217041 View in PubMed
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