Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Seeking paths to culturally competent health care: lessons from two Saskatchewan Aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162053
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Jun;39(2):166-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Pammla Petrucka
Sandra Bassendowski
Carrie Bourassa
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Jun;39(2):166-82
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Planning
Consumer Participation - methods - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Interinstitutional Relations
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Research - organization & administration
Saskatchewan
Social Values
Transcultural Nursing - education - organization & administration
Abstract
The Southern Saskatchewan/Urban Aboriginal Health Coalition is an interdisciplinary, intersectoral team of researchers and communities dedicated to exploring culturally respectful care in Aboriginal communities. Through a community-based research approach, the communities and the Coalition used sharing circles to determine the key elements that 2 Saskatchewan Aboriginal communities see as requisite for culturally competent care. Through triangulation and thematic analysis, 9 initial themes and 4 broad thematic groupings were derived. The lessons from this study could inform further research with these communities and other culturally diverse groups with respect to cultural competency in terms of both health-care providers and health services.
PubMed ID
17679591 View in PubMed
Less detail

Relationship building for research: the Southern Saskatchewan/Urban Aboriginal Health Coalition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167144
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Sandra Bassendowski
Pammla Petrucka
Marlene Smadu
Chief Roger Redman
Carrie Bourassa
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Regina SK, Canada.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):267-74
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethics, Institutional
Health Care Coalitions
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Population Groups
Saskatchewan
Urban Population
Abstract
The Southern Saskatchewan/Urban Aboriginal Health Coalition is an interdisciplinary, intersectoral team of researchers and communities dedicated to exploring what 'culturally respectful' care means in Aboriginal communities. Although the purpose of the research project was to examine this concept in an effort to improve health care service delivery and education for health professions, the members of the Coalition realized early in the process that one of the primary factors related to the success of the project would be the building and sustaining of relationships. This paper describes a relational process that was used to initiate, facilitate, and support a research partnership with the Aboriginal communities. Through a community-based process, two communities and the Coalition used sharing circles and workshops as a method to create relationships and begin a discussion about what constitutes key elements of culturally respectful health care and education. These elements have not yet been determined as the Coalition and community members have focused on fostering relationships which have been critical to building the partnership with the Aboriginal communities.
PubMed ID
17026434 View in PubMed
Less detail

Completing the circle: elders speak about end-of-life care with aboriginal families in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144144
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):6-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mary Hampton
Angelina Baydala
Carrie Bourassa
Kim McKay-McNabb
Cheryl Placsko
Ken Goodwill
Betty McKenna
Pat McNabb
Roxanne Boekelder
Author Affiliation
Luther College, University of Regina Campus, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4S 0A2. mary.hampton@uregina.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):6-14
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cultural Competency
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Professional-Patient Relations
Saskatchewan
Terminal Care
Abstract
In this article, we share words spoken by Aboriginal elders from Saskatchewan, Canada, in response to the research question, "What would you like non-Aboriginal health care providers to know when providing end-of-life care for Aboriginal families?" Our purpose in publishing these results in a written format is to place information shared by oral tradition in an academic context and to make the information accessible to other researchers. Recent theoretical work in the areas of death and dying suggests that cultural beliefs and practices are particularly influential at the end of life; however, little work describing the traditional beliefs and practices of Aboriginal peoples in Canada exists to guide culturally appropriate end-of-life care delivery. Purposive sampling procedures were used to recruit five elders from culturally diverse First Nations in southern Saskatchewan. Key informant Aboriginal elder participants were videotaped by two Aboriginal research assistants, who approached the elders at powwows. Narrative analysis of the key informant interview transcripts was conducted to identify key concepts and emerging narrative themes describing culturally appropriate end-of-life health care for Aboriginal families. Six themes were identified to organize the data into a coherent narrative: realization; gathering of community; care and comfort/transition; moments after death; grief, wake, funeral; and messages to health care providers. These themes told the story of the dying person's journey and highlighted important messages from elders to non-Aboriginal health care providers.
PubMed ID
20402179 View in PubMed
Less detail

SevenYears of completing the circle: end-of-life care with Aboriginal families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130700
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Sep;43(3):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Mary Hampton
Angelina Baydala
Carrie Bourassa
Betty McKenna
Gerald Saul
Kim McKay-McNabb
Ken Goodwill
Velda Clark
Jeff Christiansen
Author Affiliation
Luther College, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Sep;43(3):119-25
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Population Groups
Saskatchewan
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
21977729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Participatory health research: celebrating smoke-free homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107298
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Sep;59(9):1014-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Vivian R Ramsden
Shari McKay
Shirley Bighead
Gail Boucher
Carrie Bourassa
Peter Butt
Andrea Clinton
Jackie Crowe
Fred Felix
Derek Jorgenson
Karen LaRocque
Nora McKee
Irene Nketia
Norma Rabbitskin
Ella Thunderchild
Cheryl Troupe
Tara Turner
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Sep;59(9):1014-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Saskatchewan
Smoking - prevention & control
Abstract
For community engagement to be successful, the interests of the community must be taken into account and researchers must become facilitators. Patience is required. Meaningful and sustainable relationships that have been developed over time promote mutual learning and capacity building among the partners (Elders, community members, health care providers, and researchers). In addition, community engagement leads to the sharing of available resources (eg, human, time, and financial) and to a sustained commitment by the partners. This mutual commitment makes future projects easier to develop and complete. Thus, authentic transformative health development, informed by participatory health research, becomes an ongoing process.
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2003 Feb;49:195-7, 200-212619744
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1998;19:173-2029611617
Cites: Glob Health Promot. 2010 Dec;17(4):32-4221510097
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2006 Jul;7(3):312-2316760238
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2006 Dec;21(4):293-30016873393
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Sep 18;319(7212):774-810488012
PubMed ID
24029518 View in PubMed
Less detail