Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

An international view of how recent-onset atrial fibrillation is treated in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118794
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2012 Nov;19(11):1255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Carly Rogenstein
Anne-Maree Kelly
Suzanne Mason
Sandra Schneider
Eddy Lang
Catherine M Clement
Ian G Stiell
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2012 Nov;19(11):1255-60
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - therapy
Australasia
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Conscious Sedation - methods
Electric Countershock - utilization
Emergency Medicine - standards - trends
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Great Britain
Health Care Surveys
Heart rate
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Questionnaires
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
This study was conducted to determine if there is practice variation for emergency physicians' (EPs) management of recent-onset atrial fibrillation (RAF) in various world regions (Canada, United States, United Kingdom, and Australasia).
The authors completed a mail and e-mail survey of members from four national emergency medicine (EM) associations. One prenotification letter and three survey letters were sent to members of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP; Canada-1,177 members surveyed), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP; United States-500), College of Emergency Medicine UK (CEM; United Kingdom-1,864), and Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM; Australasia-1,188) as per the modified Dillman technique. The survey contained 23 questions related to the management of adult patients with symptomatic RAF (either a first episode or paroxysmal-recurrent) where onset is less than 48 hours and cardioversion is considered a treatment option. Data were analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics.
Response rates were as follows: overall, 40.5%; Canada, 43.0%; United States, 50.1%; United Kingdom, 38.1%; and Australasia, 38.0%. Physician demographics were as follows: 72% male and mean (?SD) age 41.7 (?8.39) years. The proportions of physicians attempting rate control as their initial strategy are United States, 94.0%; Canada, 70.7%; Australasia, 61.1%; and United Kingdom, 43.1% (p
PubMed ID
23167856 View in PubMed
Less detail

How much folate is in Canadian fortified products 10 years after mandated fortification?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148782
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):281-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yaseer A Shakur
Carly Rogenstein
Brenda Hartman-Craven
Valerie Tarasuk
Deborah L O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):281-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Folic Acid - adverse effects - analysis - therapeutic use
Food analysis
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Food, Fortified - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Prevalence
Time Factors
Vitamin B Complex - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
In 1998, the Canadian government mandated folic acid fortification of white flour and enriched grain products to lower the prevalence of neural tube defects. There is now growing concern over the potential harmful effects of too much folic acid on some segments of the population. Given that the actual amount of folate in Canadian foods is unknown, the objective of this study was to measure the folate content in selected fortified foods.
Using data from the 2001 Food Expenditure Survey and the ACNielsen Company, 95 of the most commonly purchased folic acid-fortified foods in Canada were identified. Folate concentrations in these foods were determined using tri-enzyme digestion followed by microbiological assay. Analyzed values were compared to those in the Canadian Nutrient File (2007b, CNF) and to label values.
The analyzed folate content of foods was, on average, 151% +/- 63 of the CNF values. Analyzed values as a percent of CNF values ranged from 116% in the "rolls and buns" category to 188% in "ready-to-eat cereals". Analyzed values were higher than label values for "breads", "rolls and buns" and "ready-to-eat cereals" (141%, 118% and 237%, respectively [p
PubMed ID
19722341 View in PubMed
Less detail