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Are the "myths" of low back pain alive in the general Norwegian population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71238
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(5):395-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Camilla Ihlebaek
Hege R Eriksen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Back Pain Network, Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(5):395-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - etiology - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Public Opinion
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Telephone
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the perception of low back pain care and consequences according to what Deyo refers to as seven "myths" about back pain, in the Norwegian population. METHODS: In spring 2001, seven questions, corresponding to Deyo's myths, were included in an opinion poll (telephone interviews) of a representative sample (n=1015) of the Norwegian population. RESULTS: In total, 41% of the population held that 'If you have a slipped disc you must have surgery'. Approximately 50% believed that 'X-ray and newer imaging tests can always identify the cause of pain' and 'Most back pain is caused by injury and heavy lifting'. Almost 60% agreed that 'Everyone with back pain should have a spine X-ray'. However, only one-quarter believed that 'If your back hurts, you should take it easy until the pain goes away', and approximately one-fifth believed that 'Back pain is usually disabling'. Only 12% believed that 'Bed rest is the mainstay of therapy'. More individuals in the lower- compared with the higher-educated groups believed in the myths. CONCLUSION: Information concerning current knowledge on healthcare and health consequences of low back pain had reached only a small part of the general population. The most important factor for lack of knowledge was education. Developing effective methods to promote adequate self-care and treatment and reduce the risk of chronicity of low back pain in the lower-educated groups should be a top priority.
PubMed ID
14555377 View in PubMed
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Effect of animal-assisted interventions on depression, agitation and quality of life in nursing home residents suffering from cognitive impairment or dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289975
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 12; 31(12):1312-1321
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2016
Author
Christine Olsen
Ingeborg Pedersen
Astrid Bergland
Marie-José Enders-Slegers
Grete Patil
Camilla Ihlebaek
Author Affiliation
Section for Public Health Science, Department of Landscape Architecture and Spatial Planning, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway. christine.olsen@nmbu.no.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 12; 31(12):1312-1321
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cognition Disorders - psychology
Dementia - psychology
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Dogs
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Pets - psychology
Prospective Studies
Psychomotor Agitation - therapy
Quality of Life - psychology
Abstract
The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home residents is known to be very high, with depression and agitation being the most common symptoms. The possible effects of a 12-week intervention with animal-assisted activities (AAA) in nursing homes were studied. The primary outcomes related to depression, agitation and quality of life (QoL).
A prospective, cluster randomized multicentre trial with a follow-up measurement 3?months after end of intervention was used. Inclusion criteria were men and women aged 65?years or older, with a diagnosis of dementia or having a cognitive deficit. Ten nursing homes were randomized to either AAA with a dog or a control group with treatment as usual. In total, 58 participants were recruited: 28 in the intervention group and 30 in the control group. The intervention consisted of a 30-min session with AAA twice weekly for 12?weeks in groups of three to six participants, led by a qualified dog handler. Norwegian versions of the Cornell Scale for Depression, the Brief Agitation Rating Scale and the Quality of Life in Late-stage Dementia scale were used.
A significant effect on depression and QoL was found for participants with severe dementia at follow-up. For QoL, a significant effect of AAA was also found immediately after the intervention. No effects on agitation were found.
Animal-assisted activities may have a positive effect on symptoms of depression and QoL in older people with dementia, especially those in a late stage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Notes
CommentIn: Evid Based Nurs. 2017 Apr;20(2):60 PMID 28219932
PubMed ID
26807956 View in PubMed
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Effect of peer-based low back pain information and reassurance at the workplace on sick leave: a cluster randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114049
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2013 Jun;23(2):209-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Magnus Odeen
Camilla Ihlebæk
Aage Indahl
Marjon E A Wormgoor
Stein A Lie
Hege R Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Uni Health, Uni Research, P.O. Box 7810, 5020, Bergen, Norway.
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2013 Jun;23(2):209-19
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Peer Group
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate whether information and reassurance about low back pain (LBP) given to employees at the workplace could reduce sick leave.
A Cluster randomized controlled trial with 135 work units of about 3,500 public sector employees in two Norwegian municipalities, randomized into two intervention groups; Education and peer support (EPS) (n = 45 units), education and "peer support and access to an outpatient clinic" (EPSOC) (n = 48 units), and a control group (n = 42 units). Both interventions consisted of educational meetings based on a "non-injury model" and a "peer adviser" appointed by colleagues. Employees in the EPSOC group had access to an outpatient clinic for medical examination and further education. The control group received no intervention. The main outcome was sick leave based on municipal records. Secondary outcomes were self-reported pain, pain related fear of movement, coping, and beliefs about LBP from survey data of 1,746 employees (response rate about 50 %).
EPS reduced sick leave by 7 % and EPSOC reduced sick leave by 4 % during the intervention year, while sick leave in the control group was increased by 7 % during the same period. Overall, Rate Ratios (RR) were statistically significant for EPSOC (RR = .84 (C.I = 0.71-.99) but not EPS (RR = .92 (C.I = 0.78-1.09)) in a mixed Poisson regression analysis. Faulty beliefs about LBP were reduced in both intervention groups.
Educational meetings, combined with peer support and access to an outpatient clinic, were effective in reducing sick leave in public sector employees.
Notes
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Cites: Pain. 2000 Apr;85(3):317-3210781906
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:21220849601
PubMed ID
23657490 View in PubMed
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Effects on Symptoms of Agitation and Depression in Persons With Dementia Participating in Robot-Assisted Activity: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274702
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015 Oct 1;16(10):867-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2015
Author
Nina Jøranson
Ingeborg Pedersen
Anne Marie Mork Rokstad
Camilla Ihlebæk
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015 Oct 1;16(10):867-73
Date
Oct-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Artificial Intelligence
Dementia - therapy
Depression - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mild Cognitive Impairment - therapy
Norway
Nursing Homes
Psychomotor Agitation
Robotics - instrumentation
Abstract
To examine effects on symptoms of agitation and depression in nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia participating in a robot-assisted group activity with the robot seal Paro.
A cluster-randomized controlled trial. Ten nursing home units were randomized to either robot-assisted intervention or a control group with treatment as usual during 3 intervention periods from 2013 to 2014.
Ten adapted units in nursing homes in 3 counties in eastern Norway.
Sixty residents (67% women, age range 62-95 years) in adapted nursing home units with a dementia diagnosis or cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination score lower than 25/30).
Group sessions with Paro took place in a separate room at nursing homes for 30 minutes twice a week over the course of 12 weeks. Local nurses were trained to conduct the intervention.
Participants were scored on baseline measures (T0) assessing cognitive status, regular medication, agitation (BARS), and depression (CSDD). The data collection was repeated at end of intervention (T1) and at follow-up (3 months after end of intervention) (T2). Mixed models were used to test treatment and time effects.
Statistically significant differences in changes were found on agitation and depression between groups from T0 to T2. Although the symptoms of the intervention group declined, the control group's symptoms developed in the opposite direction. Agitation showed an effect estimate of -5.51, CI 0.06-10.97, P = .048, and depression -3.88, CI 0.43-7.33, P = .028. There were no significant differences in changes on either agitation or depression between groups from T0 to T1.
This study found a long-term effect on depression and agitation by using Paro in activity groups for elderly with dementia in nursing homes. Paro might be a suitable nonpharmacological treatment for neuropsychiatric symptoms and should be considered as a useful tool in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
26096582 View in PubMed
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[How is the general practitioner managing the back pain?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188297
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1800-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2002
Author
Erik L Werner
Even Laerum
Camilla Ihlebaek
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalt Ryggnettverk Formidlingsenheten KGR, Ullevål universitetssykehus 0407 Oslo. erik.werner@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1800-3
Date
Aug-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Back Pain - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Family Practice - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - economics
Registries
Abstract
A great number of patients in general practice suffer from low back pain, and the total cost of this patient population is NOK 15 billion. The aim of this study was to find out how family doctors treat their low back pain patients.
During a two week period in 2001, all family doctors in Aust-Agder county were invited to register all patients suffering from low back pain. They also answered a questionnaire about themselves and their practice.
Of the total 80 doctors invited, 53 (66%) recorded their patients, and 48 (60%) also answered the questionnaire. 220 patients were included; i.e. 3.4% of the total number of patients seen in these practices during this period. 81% of the patients underwent clinical examination, 40% were referred to X-ray or CT, 31% to an appropriate specialist, 32% to physiotherapist and 11% to chiropractor. Most of the patients were referred after 12 weeks of pain. 79% of patients received a prescription. Only 24% continued working activity.
Most patients in this study receive a medical treatment and a sick leave. More patients are referred to X-ray than what is recommended in the Norwegian guidelines.
PubMed ID
12362693 View in PubMed
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Maintaining a balance: a focus group study on living and coping with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142207
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:158
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kariann Krohne
Camilla Ihlebaek
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College, Oslo, Norway. kariann.krohne@hf.hio.no
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:158
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cognition Disorders - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Hyperalgesia - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Norway
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Whiplash Injuries - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
There is little qualitative insight into how persons with chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorder cope on a day to day basis. This study seeks to identify the symptoms persons with Whiplash-Associated Disorder describe as dominating and explore their self-initiated coping strategies.
Qualitative study using focus groups interviews. Fourteen Norwegian men and women with Whiplash-Associated Disorder (I or II) were recruited to participate in two focus groups. Data were analyzed according to a phenomenological approach, and discussed within the model of Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS).
Participants reported neck and head pain, sensory hypersensitivity, and cognitive dysfunction following their whiplash injury. Based on the intensity of symptoms, participants divided everyday life into good and bad periods. In good periods the symptoms were perceived as manageable. In bad periods the symptoms intensified and took control of the individual. Participants expressed a constant notion of trying to balance their three main coping strategies; rest, exercise, and social withdrawal. In good periods participants experienced coping by expecting good results from the strategies they used. In bad periods they experienced no or negative relationships between their behavioral strategies and their complaints.
Neck and head pain, sensory hypersensitivity, and cognitive dysfunction were reported as participants' main complaints. A constant notion of balancing between their three main coping strategies; rest, exercise, and social withdrawal, was described.
Notes
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Oct;34(4):422-3317583468
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Oct;65(8):1584-9417651877
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007 Oct;1113:304-1017584977
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Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Apr;52(4):434-4020357684
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PubMed ID
20626855 View in PubMed
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Medically unexplained conditions considered by patients in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258330
Source
Fam Pract. 2014 Apr;31(2):156-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Hedda Tschudi-Madsen
Mona Kjeldsberg
Bård Natvig
Camilla Ihlebaek
Jørund Straand
Dag Bruusgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130, Blindern, N-0318 Oslo and.
Source
Fam Pract. 2014 Apr;31(2):156-63
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - epidemiology
Female
Fibromyalgia - epidemiology
General practice
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients frequently present with multiple and 'unexplained' symptoms, often resulting in complex consultations. To better understand these patients is a challenge to health care professionals, in general, and GPs, in particular.
In our research on symptom reporting, we wanted to explore whether patients consider that they may suffer from conditions commonly regarded as unexplained, and we explored associations between these concerns and symptom load, life stressors and socio-demographic factors.
Consecutive, unselected patients in general practice completed questionnaires addressing eight conditions commonly regarded as unexplained (amalgam poisoning, Candida syndrome, fibromyalgia, food intolerance, electromagnetic hypersensitivity, burnout syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome). With logistic regression, we analysed associations with symptom load, burden of life stressors with negative impact on present health and socio-demographic variables.
Out of the 909 respondents (response rate = 88.8%), 863 had complete data. In total, 39.6% of patients had considered that they may suffer from one or more unexplained conditions (UCs). These concerns were strongly and positively associated with recent symptom load and number of life stressors. If we excluded burnout and food intolerance, corresponding associations were found.
Patients frequently considered that they may suffer from UCs. The likelihood of such concerns strongly increased with an increasing symptom load and with the number of life stressors with negative impact on present health. Hence, the number of symptoms may be a strong indicator of whether patients consider their symptoms part of such often controversial multisymptom conditions.
PubMed ID
24368761 View in PubMed
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Mental health rehabilitation in a care farm context: A descriptive review of Norwegian intervention studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279187
Source
Work. 2015;53(1):31-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ingeborg Pedersen
Grete Patil
Bente Berget
Camilla Ihlebæk
Marianne Thorsen Gonzalez
Source
Work. 2015;53(1):31-43
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Farms
Health Promotion - methods
Horticultural Therapy
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Norway
Social Support
Abstract
C are farming is a service developed at farms for promoting mental and physical health and is increasingly used in mental health rehabilitation in Norway.
This article aims to present a descriptive review of Norwegian intervention research on care farms that provide rehabilitation for people with mental health disorders.
This literature review applied a non-systematic search strategy: all articles in the field known to the authors were selected for inclusion. The selected studies were intervention studies that were conducted on farms in Norway, that used adult participants with mental health problems/disorders, and that reported outcome measures related to mental health. The studies and articles presented quantitative and/or qualitative data.
The findings from the published articles report improvements to mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, perceived stress, positive affect, rumination, and self-efficacy. Qualitative data describe a variety of positive experiences, such as improved coping ability, increased social support, and appreciation of the care farm activity.
Participating in interventions on care farms positively influences mental health. Care farming may therefore be used as a supplementary approach in mental health rehabilitation, as it offers meaningful and engaging occupations and social inclusion.
PubMed ID
26684702 View in PubMed
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Motivations, experiences and challenges of being a care farmer -results of a survey of Norwegian care farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279183
Source
Work. 2015;53(1):113-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Camilla Ihlebæk
Lina H Ellingsen-Dalskau
Bente Berget
Source
Work. 2015;53(1):113-21
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - methods
Educational Status
Farmers - psychology
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Rehabilitation - methods
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Care farming is an increasing part of multifunctional agriculture. Still there are few studies on how the farmers experience their working situation.
To describe care farmers' relevant education, motivation, perceived support, involvement with participants, and perceived strain. We also wanted to investigate the possible relationship between different variables and level of perceived strain.
A total of 98 (67%) Norwegian care farmers answered a postal questionnaire in 2011 on demography, motivation, relevant education, involvement in participants, and 11 statements describing perceived strain of care farming. A sum-score of the 11 statements was constructed, and a linear regression model was used to explore the relationships between total perceived strain and the other variables.
Of the farmers 40% had relevant education. Their main motivation was economical (53%) or "idealistic" (47%). 80% reported that care farming had increased their quality of life. Still the majority experienced it to be socially demanding, and 26% did not receive support from professionals. Higher total perceived strain was found for men, low education, no perceived support, high degree of involvement, and less perceived functionality of participants. The model explained 40% of the variance in total perceived strain.
More systematic cooperation and supervision from the social and health care system might be needed, in order to ensure a health promoting work situation for these care farmers.
PubMed ID
26684709 View in PubMed
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[Musculoskeletal disorders as causes of sick leave and disability benefits].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138759
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Dec 2;130(23):2369-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2010
Author
Søren Brage
Camilla Ihlebaek
Bård Natvig
Dag Bruusgaard
Author Affiliation
Utredningsseksjonen, Arbeids- og velferdsdirektoratet, Postboks 5 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway. soren.brage@nav.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Dec 2;130(23):2369-70
Date
Dec-2-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Insurance, Health
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neck Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sick Leave
Social Security
Abstract
Musculoskeletal disorders make up a heterogeneous group. Our aim was to describe the variation in social insurance benefits for the most prevalent disorders within this group.
The study was based on the Norwegian labour and welfare administration's registers on sickness benefits and disability benefits.
Of the musculoskeletal disorders, low back conditions are the most frequent causes of sick leave and disability benefits, and account for 11 and 9% respectively. Neck and shoulder disorders are also common causes of sick leave, while osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia are common causes of disability benefits and each account for 5% of all new cases.
The labour and welfare administration should continue to focus on musculoskeletal disorders to prevent long-term sick leave and permanent absence from work.
PubMed ID
21139664 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.