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A 32-year longitudinal study of alcohol consumption in Swedish women: Reduced risk of myocardial infarction but increased risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275258
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dominique Hange
Jóhann A Sigurdsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Valter Sundh
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Beer
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess associations between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the 32-year incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, as well as mortality, in a middle-aged female population.
Prospective study.
Gothenburg, Sweden, population about 430 000.
Representative sample of a general population of women (1462 in total) aged 38 to 60 years in 1968-1969, followed up to the ages of 70 to 92 years in 2000-2001.
Associations between alcohol intake and later risk of mortality and morbidity from myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, studied longitudinally.
During the follow-up period, 185 women developed myocardial infarction, 162 developed stroke, 160 women became diabetic, and 345 developed cancer. Women who drank beer had a 30% lower risk (hazards ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.95) of developing myocardial infarcion and almost half the risk (HR 0.51 CI 0.33-0.80). A significant association between increased risk of death from cancer and high spirits consumption was also shown (hazards ratio [HR] 1.47, CI 1.06-2.05).
Women with moderate consumption of beer had a reduced risk of developing myocardial infarction. High spirits consumption was associated with increased risk of cancer mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194171 View in PubMed
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Adipocyte size predicts incidence of type 2 diabetes in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148637
Source
FASEB J. 2010 Jan;24(1):326-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Malin Lönn
Kirsten Mehlig
Calle Bengtsson
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Bruna stråket 16, Gothenburg, Sweden. malin.lonn@medic.gu.se
Source
FASEB J. 2010 Jan;24(1):326-31
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology - physiopathology
Adipocytes - pathology - physiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Cell Count
Cell Size
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Enlarged subcutaneous abdominal adipocytes have been shown to predict incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Pima population of Arizona (USA). We investigated the role of subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size (AAS), as well as femoral adipocyte size (FAS), as predictors of T2D in a population-based Swedish cohort. In 1974-1975, a sample of 1302 middle-aged women underwent a health examination, including anthropometry and evaluation of parental medical history. In addition, body composition (total body potassium and total body water), AAS and FAS (adipose tissue needle biopsy) were assessed in a subsample of 245 women. Incidence of T2D was followed until 2001, with 36 cases eligible for inclusion in this analysis. Women developing T2D had larger AAS at baseline vs. women remaining healthy (age/heredity-adjusted hazard ratio for increase of AAS by 1 sd [AAS-HR] 1.91; P
PubMed ID
19741173 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake among women and its relationship to diabetes incidence and all-cause mortality: the 32-year follow-up of a population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9133
Source
Diabetes Care. 2005 Sep;28(9):2230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Leif Lapidus
Calle Bengtsson
Elisabet Bergfors
Cecilia Björkelund
Fredrik Spak
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Uni, Göteborg University, Box 454 S-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. leif.lapidus@swipnet.se
Source
Diabetes Care. 2005 Sep;28(9):2230-5
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Physical Fitness
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to explore the predictive value of women's alcohol habits in relation to incidence of diabetes and all-cause mortality. Special attention was paid to potential confounding factors such as age, heredity, education, socioeconomic group, physical inactivity, smoking, blood pressure, serum lipids, and, in particular, obesity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A longitudinal population study consisting of a representative sample of 1,462 women aged 38-60 started in Göteborg, Sweden, in 1968-1969 monitoring for diabetes and mortality over 32 years. RESULTS: Alcohol intake, expressed as intake of wine, hard liquor, or total grams of alcohol, was significantly negatively associated to 32-year diabetes incidence independent of age. However, the apparently protective effect of the alcohol variables was attenuated when BMI was included as a covariate. The inverse relationship between wine intake and diabetes did not remain after adjustment for physical activity or socioeconomic group. Beer and wine intake were significantly negatively associated to mortality. Increase of alcohol intake between the examination in 1968-1969 and 1980-1981 was significantly inversely related to the mortality between 1980-1981 and 2000-2001 and independent of all covariates. No relationship was observed between an increase in alcohol intake and diabetes incidence. However, after adjustment for age, family history, and basal alcohol consumption altogether, a significant inverse relationship was observed between increase of alcohol and diabetes incidence. CONCLUSIONS: The initially significant inverse associations observed between alcohol and diabetes as well as mortality were dependent on a number of confounding factors, of which BMI seems to be the most important.
PubMed ID
16123495 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Aug 21;100(34):2626
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2003
Author
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Aug 21;100(34):2626
Date
Aug-21-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Pharmacies - organization & administration
Sweden
PubMed ID
12968327 View in PubMed
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Association between periodontal disease and ischemic heart disease among Swedish women: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151946
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(4):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ulrika Stenman
Anette Wennström
Margareta Ahlqwist
Calle Bengtsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Lauren Lissner
Magnus Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Ulrika.Stenman@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(4):193-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Chronic Periodontitis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gingival Pocket - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Personal Satisfaction
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the relationship between chronic periodontitis and ischemic heart disease (IHD).
A cross-section of women aged 38 to 84 years were examined in 1992-93 (analysis based on n=1056). Medical and dental examinations were included in the analysis specifically with regard to IHD and periodontitis. Other well-known risk factors for IHD were used as covariates in multivariable statistical analysis.
Among the dentate women in this study (n=847), 74 had IHD and 773 did not. There was no statistically significant difference between numbers of pathological gingival pockets between these groups (58.1% had one or more pathological pockets in the IHD group compared to 57.6% in the non-IHD group). Bivariate analysis of dentate individuals showed significant associations between IHD and number of missing teeth, age, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, life satisfaction, hypertension, and levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. However, in the final multivariable logistic regression model, with the exception of age, only number of teeth (
PubMed ID
19301159 View in PubMed
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Bariatric surgery and long-term cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128246
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2012
Author
Lars Sjöström
Markku Peltonen
Peter Jacobson
C David Sjöström
Kristjan Karason
Hans Wedel
Sofie Ahlin
Åsa Anveden
Calle Bengtsson
Gerd Bergmark
Claude Bouchard
Björn Carlsson
Sven Dahlgren
Jan Karlsson
Anna-Karin Lindroos
Hans Lönroth
Kristina Narbro
Ingmar Näslund
Torsten Olbers
Per-Arne Svensson
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lars.v.sjostrom@medfak.gu.se
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Date
Jan-4-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Obesity - surgery
Prospective Studies
Stroke - mortality - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Weight loss might protect against cardiovascular events, but solid evidence is lacking.
To study the association between bariatric surgery, weight loss, and cardiovascular events.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study is an ongoing, nonrandomized, prospective, controlled study conducted at 25 public surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden of 2010 obese participants who underwent bariatric surgery and 2037 contemporaneously matched obese controls who received usual care. Patients were recruited between September 1, 1987, and January 31, 2001. Date of analysis was December 31, 2009, with median follow-up of 14.7 years (range, 0-20 years). Inclusion criteria were age 37 to 60 years and a body mass index of at least 34 in men and at least 38 in women. Exclusion criteria were identical in surgery and control patients. Surgery patients underwent gastric bypass (13.2%), banding (18.7%), or vertical banded gastroplasty (68.1%), and controls received usual care in the Swedish primary health care system. Physical and biochemical examinations and database cross-checks were undertaken at preplanned intervals.
The primary end point of the SOS study (total mortality) was published in 2007. Myocardial infarction and stroke were predefined secondary end points, considered separately and combined.
Bariatric surgery was associated with a reduced number of cardiovascular deaths (28 events among 2010 patients in the surgery group vs 49 events among 2037 patients in the control group; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29-0.76; P = .002). The number of total first time (fatal or nonfatal) cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke, whichever came first) was lower in the surgery group (199 events among 2010 patients) than in the control group (234 events among 2037 patients; adjusted HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.83; P
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2012 Mar;8(3):13022271190
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Apr 18;307(15):1577; author reply 1577-822511678
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Mar;9(3):12622271018
Comment In: Praxis (Bern 1994). 2012 May 9;101(10):673-522565560
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):88-922215170
PubMed ID
22215166 View in PubMed
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Birth weight in relation to leisure time physical activity in adolescence and adulthood: meta-analysis of results from 13 nordic cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98582
Source
PLoS One. 2009;4(12):e8192
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lise Geisler Andersen
Lars Angquist
Michael Gamborg
Liisa Byberg
Calle Bengtsson
Dexter Canoy
Johan G Eriksson
Marit Eriksson
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Lauren Lissner
Tom I Nilsen
Merete Osler
Kim Overvad
Finn Rasmussen
Minna K Salonen
Lene Schack-Nielsen
Tuija H Tammelin
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Jennifer L Baker
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Center for Health and Society, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2009;4(12):e8192
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Birth Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Scandinavia
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prenatal life exposures, potentially manifested as altered birth size, may influence the later risk of major chronic diseases through direct biologic effects on disease processes, but also by modifying adult behaviors such as physical activity that may influence later disease risk. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the association between birth weight and leisure time physical activity (LTPA) in 43,482 adolescents and adults from 13 Nordic cohorts. Random effects meta-analyses were performed on categorical estimates from cohort-, age-, sex- and birth weight specific analyses. Birth weight showed a reverse U-shaped association with later LTPA; within the range of normal weight the association was negligible but weights below and above this range were associated with a lower probability of undertaking LTPA. Compared with the reference category (3.26-3.75 kg), the birth weight categories of 1.26-1.75, 1.76-2.25, 2.26-2.75, and 4.76-5.25 kg, had odds ratios of 0.67 (95% confidence interval: 0.47, 0.94), 0.72 (0.59, 0.88), 0.89 (0.79, 0.99), and 0.65 (0.50, 0.86), respectively. The shape and strength of the birth weight-LTPA association was virtually independent of sex, age, gestational age, educational level, concurrent body mass index, and smoking. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The association between birth weight and undertaking LTPA is very weak within the normal birth weight range, but both low and high birth weights are associated with a lower probability of undertaking LTPA, which hence may be a mediator between prenatal influences and later disease risk.
PubMed ID
20016780 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure components and changes in relation to white matter lesions: a 32-year prospective population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150631
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Jul;54(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Xinxin Guo
Leonardo Pantoni
Michela Simoni
Calle Bengtsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Lauren Lissner
Deborah Gustafson
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. xinxin.guo@neuro.gu.se
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Jul;54(1):57-62
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Brain - pathology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the long-term effect of high blood pressure (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure) on white matter lesions and to study changes in different blood pressure components in relation to white matter lesions. A representative population of women was examined in 1968 and re-examined in 1974, 1980, 1992, and 2000. The presence and severity of white matter lesions on computed tomography were rated by a visual rating scale in 1992 and 2000 in 539 women. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured at all of the examinations. We found that presence and severity of white matter lesions in 1992/2000 were associated with higher diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure at each examination but not with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. Odds ratios (95% CIs) for the presence of white matter lesions per 10-mm Hg increase in diastolic pressure were 1.4 (1.0 to 1.9) in 1968, 1.3 (1.0 to 1.8) in 1974, 1.4 (1.1 to 1.9) in 1980, and 1.3 (1.0 to 1.6) in 1992 after adjustment for confounders. The presence of white matter lesions was also associated with a 24-year increase in diastolic pressure (>10 mm Hg), systolic pressure (>40 mm Hg), pulse pressure (>24 mm Hg), and mean arterial pressure (>6 mm Hg; odds ratios [95% CIs]: 2.6 [1.3 to 5.1] for diastolic pressure; 2.0 [1.2 to 3.4] for systolic pressure; 1.8 [1.1 to 2.7] for pulse pressure; and 2.2 [1.4 to 3.4] for mean arterial pressure). Our findings suggest that lowering high diastolic blood pressure and preventing large increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressures may have a protective effect on white matter lesions.
PubMed ID
19487586 View in PubMed
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Body configuration as a predictor of mortality: comparison of five anthropometric measures in a 12 year follow-up of the Norwegian HUNT 2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130164
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e26621
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Halfdan Petursson
Johann A Sigurdsson
Calle Bengtsson
Tom I L Nilsen
Linn Getz
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. halfdanpe@gmail.com
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e26621
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Weights and Measures - statistics & numerical data
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Obesity - mortality - physiopathology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Distribution of body fat is more important than the amount of fat as a prognostic factor for life expectancy. Despite that, body mass index (BMI) still holds its status as the most used indicator of obesity in clinical work.
We assessed the association of five different anthropometric measures with mortality in general and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in particular using Cox proportional hazards models. Predictive properties were compared by computing integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement for two different prediction models. The measures studied were BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). The study population was a prospective cohort of 62,223 Norwegians, age 20-79, followed up for mortality from 1995-1997 to the end of 2008 (mean follow-up 12.0 years) in the Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT 2).
After adjusting for age, smoking and physical activity WHR and WHtR were found to be the strongest predictors of death. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD mortality per increase in WHR of one standard deviation were 1.23 for men and 1.27 for women. For WHtR, these HRs were 1.24 for men and 1.23 for women. WHR offered the greatest integrated discrimination improvement to the prediction models studied, followed by WHtR and waist circumference. Hip circumference was in strong inverse association with mortality when adjusting for waist circumference. In all analyses, BMI had weaker association with mortality than three of the other four measures studied.
Our study adds further knowledge to the evidence that BMI is not the most appropriate measure of obesity in everyday clinical practice. WHR can reliably be measured and is as easy to calculate as BMI and is currently better documented than WHtR. It appears reasonable to recommend WHR as the primary measure of body composition and obesity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22028926 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.