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Adverse effects of delayed treatment for perforated peptic ulcer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217583
Source
Ann Surg. 1994 Aug;220(2):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
C. Svanes
R T Lie
K. Svanes
S A Lie
O. Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Ann Surg. 1994 Aug;220(2):168-75
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Duodenal Ulcer - complications - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - complications - mortality - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Stomach Ulcer - complications - surgery
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The authors assessed the consequences of delayed treatment for ulcer perforation with regard to short-term and long-term survival, complication rates, and length of hospital stay.
Important adverse effects of delayed treatment have not been studied previously. Conflicting results have been given with regard to short-term survival.
One thousand two hundred ninety-two patients operated on for perforated peptic ulcer in the Bergen area between 1935 and 1990 were studied. The effect of delay on postoperative lethality and complications adjusted for age, sex, ulcer site, and year of perforation was analyzed by stepwise logistic regression. The effect of delay on duration of hospital stay adjusted for potential confounding factors was analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression. Observed survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and expected survival was calculated from population mortality data.
Adverse effects increased markedly when delay exceeded 12 hours. Delay of more than 24 hours increased lethality sevenfold to eightfold, complication rate to threefold, and length of hospital stay to twofold, compared with delay of 6 hours or less. The reduced long-term survival for patients treated more than 12 hours after perforation could be attributed entirely to high postoperative mortality.
Delayed treatment after peptic ulcer perforation reduced survival, increased complication rates, and caused prolonged hospital stay. To improve outcome after ulcer perforation, an effort should be made to keep delay at less 12 hours, particularly in elderly patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8053739 View in PubMed
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The association between birth size and atopy in young North-European adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51819
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Aug;35(8):1022-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
B N Laerum
C. Svanes
T. Wentzel-Larsen
A. Gulsvik
M. Iversen
T. Gislason
R. Jögi
E. Norrman
C. Janson
E. Omenaas
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. birger.lerum@helse-bergen.no
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Aug;35(8):1022-7
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Birth Weight - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology - immunology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Head - anatomy & histology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is evidence that atopic disorders may begin in intra-uterine life; however, studies of birth characteristics and atopy show conflicting results. METHODS: We wanted to investigate the association of birth weight and head circumference with serum total or specific IgE, allergic rhinitis or eczema while addressing the influence of demographic and geographical factors. In this historic prospective cohort study, data were collected from birth records for 1683 men and women born in 1947-1973, from six Nordic-Baltic populations participating in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Blood tests for the measurement of serum total and specific IgE were available for 1494 subjects. In multiple regression analyses, adjustments were made for birth length, gender, age, study centre, adult body mass index, level of education, parental and adult smoking. RESULTS There was no association of birth weight (n=1230) and head circumference (n=285) with serum total IgE, specific IgE antibodies, allergic rhinitis or eczema. There were neither significant interactions by gender or age, nor heterogeneity between the study centres in the analyses of birth weight and adult atopy. CONCLUSION: Birth size was not associated with atopy among adults in this large Nordic-Baltic population study.
PubMed ID
16120083 View in PubMed
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Association of asthma and hay fever with irregular menstruation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15053
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
C. Svanes
F Gomez Real
T. Gislason
C. Jansson
R. Jögi
E. Norrman
L. Nyström
K. Torén
E. Omenaas
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway. cecilie.svanes@med.uib.no
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):445-50
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Menstruation Disturbances - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that asthmatic women are more likely to have abnormal sex hormone levels. A study was undertaken to determine whether asthma and allergy were associated with irregular menstruation in a general population, and the potential role of asthma medication for this association. METHODS: A total of 8588 women (response rate 77%) participated in an 8 year follow up postal questionnaire study of participants of the ECRHS stage I in Denmark, Estonia, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Only non-pregnant women not taking exogenous sex hormones were included in the analyses (n = 6137). RESULTS: Irregular menstruation was associated with asthma (OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.11 to 2.13)), asthma symptoms (OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.86)), hay fever (OR 1.29 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.57)), and asthma preceded by hay fever (OR 1.95 (95% CI 1.30 to 2.96)) among women aged 26-42 years. This was also observed in women not taking asthma medication (asthma symptoms: OR 1.44 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91); hay fever: OR 1.27 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.58); wheeze preceded by hay fever: OR 1.76 (95% CI 1.18 to 2.64)). Irregular menstruation was associated with new onset asthma in younger women (OR 1.58 (95% CI 1.03 to 2.42)) but not in women aged 42-54 years (OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.32 to 1.18)). The results were consistent across centres. CONCLUSIONS: Younger women with asthma and allergy were more likely to have irregular menstruation. This could not be attributed to current use of asthma medication. The association could possibly be explained by common underlying metabolic or developmental factors. The authors hypothesise that insulin resistance may play a role in asthma and allergy.
Notes
Comment In: Thorax. 2005 Oct;60(10):793-416192360
PubMed ID
15923242 View in PubMed
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Birth characteristics and asthma symptoms in young adults: results from a population-based cohort study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15691
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Dec;12(6):1366-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
C. Svanes
E. Omenaas
J M Heuch
L M Irgens
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Dept of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Dec;12(6):1366-70
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - etiology
Birth weight
Body Height
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - complications
Male
Maternal Age
Norway
Odds Ratio
Parity
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Abstract
There is evidence that the origin of obstructive lung disease may be traced back to foetal life. The associations between birth characteristics and asthma symptoms were studied in a random population sample of young Norwegian adults. Respiratory symptoms were recorded in a population-based questionnaire survey. The records of all subjects aged 20-24 yrs were linked with the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Of 868 subjects born in Norway, there were 690 (79%) responders. The associations between asthma symptoms and birth characteristics were analysed by logistic regression, adjusted for possible confounding factors. Asthma symptoms in young adults were inversely associated with birth weight (odds ratio (OR)wheeze=0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.69-0.96x500 g increase in birth weight(-1))), and after adjustment for gestational age, birth length, parity and maternal age (ORwheeze=0.69; 95% CI=0.50-0.95x500 g increase in birth weight(-1)). The association did not vary according to adult smoking habits or atopic status and remained when premature and low weight births were excluded (ORwheeze=0.73; 95% CI=0.60-0.90x500 g increase in birth weight(-1)). The association was consistent for all asthma symptoms. Adjusted for birth weight, asthma symptoms were further associated with low gestational age, high birth length and low maternal age. In a random sample of young adults, asthma symptoms were strongly associated with low birth weight, an association driven by the full-term births within the normal birth weight range. The findings show that the risk for adult asthma is partly established early in life and suggest that poor intrauterine growth is involved in the aetiology of asthma.
PubMed ID
9877492 View in PubMed
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Causes of death in patients with peptic ulcer perforation: a long-term follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21222
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Jan;34(1):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
C. Svanes
S A Lie
R T Lie
O. Søreide
K. Svanes
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Surgery, Haukeland Hospital, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Jan;34(1):18-24
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - mortality
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - complications - mortality - surgery
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Survival is lower in ulcer perforation patients than in the general population. This study assesses the causes of death in patients treated for peptic ulcer perforation. METHODS: Cause-specific mortality in a population-based cohort of 817 patients treated for ulcer perforation in western Norway during the period 1962-1990 was compared with cause-specific population death rates. Analyses were based on observed and expected mortality curves for major causes of death and on standardized mortality rates (SMRs). Cox regression models were used to analyse possible differences on the basis of sex, birth cohort, surgical procedure, and ulcer location. RESULTS: Ulcer perforation patients experienced increased mortality from neoplasms (SMR = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-2.1), lung cancer (SMR = 3.6; 95% CI = 2.3-4.9), circulatory diseases (SMR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.1-1.6), ischaemic heart disease (SMR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.03-1.6), and respiratory diseases (SMR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.3-2.6). Postoperative deaths accounted for 38% of all excess deaths. Death from recurrent peptic ulcer was increased also in subjects who survived the 1st year after the perforation (SMR = 5.8; 95% CI = 1.2-10.4) but accounted for only a few deaths. The increase in mortality from lung cancer was higher in subjects born after 1910 than in patients of older generations. Excess mortality from lung cancer and from circulatory diseases was higher in male than in female patients. CONCLUSIONS: Increased mortality in ulcer perforation patients could mainly be attributed to smoking-related diseases. This is indirect evidence that smoking may be an important aetiologic factor for ulcer perforation.
PubMed ID
10048727 View in PubMed
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Hormone replacement therapy, body mass index and asthma in perimenopausal women: a cross sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15004
Source
Thorax. 2006 Jan;61(1):34-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
F. Gómez Real
C. Svanes
E H Björnsson
K A Franklin
K. Franklin
D. Gislason
T. Gislason
A. Gulsvik
C. Janson
R. Jögi
T. Kiserud
D. Norbäck
L. Nyström
K. Torén
T. Wentzel-Larsen
E. Omenaas
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway. francisco.real@med.uib.no
Source
Thorax. 2006 Jan;61(1):34-40
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - chemically induced - etiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Middle Aged
Perimenopause
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and obesity both appear to increase the risk of asthma. A study was undertaken to investigate the association of HRT with asthma and hay fever in a population of perimenopausal women, focusing on a possible interaction with body mass index (BMI). METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent to population based samples in Denmark, Estonia, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden in 1999-2001, and 8588 women aged 25-54 years responded (77%). Pregnant women, women using oral contraceptives, and women
Notes
Erratum In: Thorax. 2006 Mar;61(3):274Franklin, K [corrected to Franklin, KA]
PubMed ID
16244093 View in PubMed
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Hospitalization for lung disease in early childhood and asthma symptoms in young adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15689
Source
Respir Med. 1998 Aug;92(8):1003-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
C. Svanes
E. Omenaas
G E Eide
O. Fluge
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland Hospital, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Respir Med. 1998 Aug;92(8):1003-9
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Lung Diseases - complications
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Longitudinal studies have reported an association between early childhood lung disease and adult respiratory disease. This issue has not been addressed in the Nordic countries. We studied the association between hospitalization for lung disease in early childhood and asthma in young adulthood in a Norwegian population sample, while estimating the attributable fraction of childhood hospitalization. A population-based survey in Bergen, Norway included a random sample of 4300 subjects aged 20-44 years, of whom 80% responded. The effect of hospitalization for lung disease before the age of 2 years on asthma in adulthood was analysed by logistic and polytomous logistic regressions, adjusting for related variables. Adjusted attributable fractions were estimated from these models. The risk for different measures of asthma was significantly increased in the 103 persons reporting childhood hospitalization (airways symptoms: OR from 1.9 to 2.9; asthma medication: OR = 2.8). The associations with airways symptoms were stronger in women (OR from 2.6 to 5.3) than in men (OR from 1.4 to 2.4). Given a causal association, adjusted attributable fractions showed that childhood lung disease causing hospitalization explained 4% of asthma symptoms. Early childhood hospitalization for lung disease was related to asthma symptoms in young Norwegian adults, more strongly in women than in men. Only a minor proportion of asthma symptoms in this age group could be related to hospitalization for lung disease in early childhood.
PubMed ID
9893766 View in PubMed
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Incidence of multiple sclerosis in Møre and Romsdal, Norway from 1950 to 1991. An age-period-cohort analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212795
Source
Brain. 1996 Feb;119 ( Pt 1):203-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
R. Midgard
T. Riise
C. Svanes
G. Kvåle
H. Nyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Molde County Hospital, Norway.
Source
Brain. 1996 Feb;119 ( Pt 1):203-11
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - classification - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
We have examined the time trends in multiple sclerosis incidence over the past four decades from 1950 to 1991 in Møre and Romsdal County, Norway. Incidence rates by year of birth, year of onset and year of diagnosis according to sex, age and clinical course were studied. All patients with multiple sclerosis diagnosed by August 1992 were included, giving a total of 419 patients (171 men, 248 women) with onset of multiple sclerosis in the period 1950-91. Mean age at onset was 33.2 years, and mean age at diagnosis was 39.2 years. The incidence rate by year of onset increased from 2.87 per 100 000 in the period 1950-54 (men 3.06, women 2.67) to 5.57 per 100 000 in 1985-91 (men 3.75, women 7.94) (P
PubMed ID
8624682 View in PubMed
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Incidence of perforated ulcer in western Norway, 1935-1990: cohort- or period-dependent time trends?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67709
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1995 May 1;141(9):836-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1995
Author
C. Svanes
R T Lie
G. Kvåle
K. Svanes
O. Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1995 May 1;141(9):836-44
Date
May-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Cohort Effect
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous reports have shown that peptic ulcer mortality follows birth cohorts. To the authors' knowledge, temporal variation in ulcer incidence has not been studied. Therefore, they present incidence data for a defined area of western Norway where 1,312 patients born between 1845 and 1975 were treated for ulcer perforation between 1935 and 1990. A rise and subsequent fall in incidence was observed in successive birth cohorts for both sexes, with the highest incidence observed for males born between 1900 and 1919 and females born between 1920 and 1929. Age-period-cohort analyses based on Poisson regression techniques were adapted to provide a statistical tool for testing specific cohort and period effects. Age-cohort models without period effects explained the variations in incidence for both sexes and all ulcer locations, suggesting cohort-dependent etiology. A cohort pattern in prevalence of smoking partly explained the cohort pattern in perforation risks for both sexes. No period effects were seen that could be attributed to the increase in the sale of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to the introduction of antibiotics around 1950, or to World War II. Susceptibility to ulcer perforation seems to follow birth cohorts, and major etiologic factors should be sought in prenatal life, in childhood, or in life-style patterns that follow birth cohorts.
PubMed ID
7717360 View in PubMed
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Insomnia is more common among subjects living in damp buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67199
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Feb;62(2):113-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
C. Janson
D. Norbäck
E. Omenaas
T. Gislason
L. Nyström
R. Jõgi
E. Lindberg
M. Gunnbjörnsdottir
E. Norrman
T. Wentzel-Larsen
C. Svanes
E J Jensen
K. Torén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Akademiska sjukhuset, SE 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. christer.janson@medsci.uu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Feb;62(2):113-8
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Floors and Floorcoverings
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Social Class
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a condition with a high prevalence and a great impact on quality of life. Little is known about the relation between and sleep disturbances and the home environment. AIM: To analyse the association between insomnia and building dampness. METHODS: In a cross-sectional, multicentre, population study, 16 190 subjects (mean age 40 years, 53% women) were studied from Reykjavik in Iceland, Bergen in Norway, Umeå, Uppsala, and Göteborg in Sweden, Aarhus in Denmark, and Tartu in Estonia. Symptoms related to insomnia were assessed by questionnaire. RESULTS: Subjects living in houses with reported signs of building dampness (n = 2873) had a higher prevalence of insomnia (29.4 v 23.6%; crude odds ratio 1.35, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.48). The association between insomnia and different indicators of building dampness was strongest for floor dampness: "bubbles or discoloration on plastic floor covering or discoloration of parquet floor" (crude odds ratio 1.96, 95% CI 1.66 to 2.32). The associations remained significant after adjusting for possible confounders such as sex, age, smoking history, housing, body mass index, and respiratory diseases. There was no significant difference between the centres in the association between insomnia and building dampness. CONCLUSION: Insomnia is more common in subjects living in damp buildings. This indicates that avoiding dampness in building constructions and improving ventilation in homes may possibly have a positive effect on the quality of sleep.
PubMed ID
15657193 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.