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21 records – page 1 of 3.

[4 simultaneous cases of methanol poisoning caused by home-made plum brandy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12892
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Jan 24;145(4):232-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-1983

Antibiotic treatment of venereal disease and Reiter's syndrome in a Greenland population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3756
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1992 Feb;35(2):190-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
T. Bardin
C. Enel
F. Cornelis
C. Salski
C. Jorgensen
R. Ward
G M Lathrop
Author Affiliation
Clinique de Rhumatologie, Hôpital Lariboisière, France.
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1992 Feb;35(2):190-4
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Comparative Study
Erythromycin - therapeutic use
Female
Greenland - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Male
Penicillins - therapeutic use
Recurrence
Reiter Disease - drug therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - drug therapy
Tetracycline - therapeutic use
Urethritis - drug therapy
Uterine Cervicitis - drug therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. To assess the effects of antibiotic treatment of urethritis or cervicitis on the incidence of recurrences of articular symptoms in Reiter's syndrome patients. METHODS. Retrospective evaluation of the medical charts of 109 patients living in Greenland. RESULTS. Thirty-seven percent of the episodes of genitourinary tract inflammation that were not treated or were treated with penicillin were followed by arthritis, compared with 10% of those treated with tetracycline or erythromycin. CONCLUSION. Antibiotics active against Chlamydia trachomatis reduced the risk of postvenereal arthritis in the population studied.
PubMed ID
1734908 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Nov 20;157(47):6559
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-1995
Author
J T Møller
B C Jørgensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Nov 20;157(47):6559
Date
Nov-20-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
PubMed ID
7483109 View in PubMed
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Does BMI influence hospital stay and morbidity after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280428
Source
Acta Orthop. 2016 Oct;87(5):466-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Henrik Husted
Christoffer C Jørgensen
Kirill Gromov
Henrik Kehlet
Source
Acta Orthop. 2016 Oct;87(5):466-72
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Body mass index
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Registries
Abstract
Background and purpose - Body mass index (BMI) outside the normal range possibly affects the perioperative morbidity and mortality following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in traditional care programs. We determined perioperative morbidity and mortality in such patients who were operated with the fast-track methodology and compared the levels with those in patients with normal BMI. Patients and methods - This was a prospective observational study involving 13,730 procedures (7,194 THA and 6,536 TKA operations) performed in a standardized fast-track setting. Complete 90-day follow-up was achieved using national registries and review of medical records. Patients were grouped according to BMI as being underweight, of normal weight, overweight, obese, very obese, and morbidly obese. Results - Median length of stay (LOS) was 2 (IQR: 2-3) days in all BMI groups. 30-day re-admission rates were around 6% for both THA (6.1%) and TKA (5.9%), without any statistically significant differences between BMI groups in univariate analysis (p > 0.4), but there was a trend of a protective effect of overweight for both THA (p = 0.1) and TKA (p = 0.06). 90-day re-admission rates increased to 8.6% for THA and 8.3% for TKA, which was similar among BMI groups, but there was a trend of lower rates in overweight and obese TKA patients (p = 0.08 and p = 0.06, respectively). When we adjusted for preoperative comorbidity, high BMI in THA patients (very obese and morbidly obese patients only) was associated with a LOS of >4 days (p = 0.001), but not with re-admission. No such relationship existed for TKA. Interpretation - A fast-track setting resulted in similar length of hospital stay and re-admission rates regardless of BMI, except for very obese and morbidly obese THA patients.
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2014 Sep;85(5):456-6224954493
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2015 Jun 3;97(11):911-926041852
Cites: J Orthop Sci. 2012 May;17(3):219-2522323012
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2015 Jan;473(1):57-6324818736
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2015 Feb 10;16:2425887100
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2013 Jun;110(6):972-8023365109
Cites: Acta Orthop Suppl. 2012 Oct;83(346):1-3923205862
Cites: J Knee Surg. 2013 Apr;26(2):89-9423504647
Cites: Bone Joint J. 2015 Jan;97-B(1):19-2325568408
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2014 Oct;29(10):1906-1025081514
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2011 Aug;82(4):417-2221657972
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2014 Sep;29(9):1758-6224890992
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2014 Jul;29(7):1359-6424674730
Cites: J Knee Surg. 2013 Apr;26(2):83-823479424
Cites: Orthop Traumatol Surg Res. 2015 May;101(3):289-9625817907
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):679-8422066560
Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2014 Nov;134(11):1615-2225118616
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2015 Jan;120(1):230-825625265
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2014 Feb;85(1):26-3124359028
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2016 Apr;31(4):749-5326652477
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2008 Apr;79(2):168-7318484241
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2015 Dec;30(12):2092-726190570
Cites: Bone Joint J. 2014 May;96-B(5):629-3524788497
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2015 Oct;67(10):1397-40525776869
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2015 Sep;30(9):1551-425887700
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2015 Feb;86(1):86-9125267501
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2008 Oct;23(7):956-918534502
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2011 Oct;82(5):577-8121895500
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2014 Oct;29(10):1889-9824996585
PubMed ID
27347785 View in PubMed
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Early morbidity after aseptic revision hip arthroplasty in Denmark: a two-year nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259449
Source
Bone Joint J. 2014 Nov;96-B(11):1464-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
M. Lindberg-Larsen
C C Jørgensen
T B Hansen
S. Solgaard
H. Kehlet
Source
Bone Joint J. 2014 Nov;96-B(11):1464-71
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Dislocation - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Osteoarthritis, Hip - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Data on early morbidity and complications after revision total hip replacement (THR) are limited. The aim of this nationwide study was to describe and quantify early morbidity after aseptic revision THR and relate the morbidity to the extent of the revision surgical procedure. We analysed all aseptic revision THRs from 1st October 2009 to 30th September 2011 using the Danish National Patient Registry, with additional information from the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry. There were 1553 procedures (1490 patients) performed in 40 centres and we divided them into total revisions, acetabular component revisions, femoral stem revisions and partial revisions. The mean age of the patients was 70.4 years (25 to 98) and the median hospital stay was five days (interquartile range 3 to 7). Within 90 days of surgery, the readmission rate was 18.3%, mortality rate 1.4%, re-operation rate 6.1%, dislocation rate 7.0% and infection rate 3.0%. There were no differences in these outcomes between high- and low-volume centres. Of all readmissions, 255 (63.9%) were due to 'surgical' complications versus 144 (36.1%) 'medical' complications. Importantly, we found no differences in early morbidity across the surgical subgroups, despite major differences in the extent and complexity of operations. However, dislocations and the resulting morbidity represent the major challenge for improvement in aseptic revision THR.
PubMed ID
25371458 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of the advantages of intensive care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235418
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Mar 30;149(14):895-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-1987

[Folic acid protects against neural tube defects. But how many women of reproductive age have been informed about this fact?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61849
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 21;96(16):1961-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-1999
Author
R. Kihlberg
T H Bui
C. Jörgensen
L. Söderhjelm
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för molekylär medicin, kliniskt genetiska avdelningen, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm. reinhold.kihlberg@osteraker.mail.telia.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 21;96(16):1961-3
Date
Apr-21-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Guidelines
Health education
Homocysteine - blood - genetics
Humans
Multicenter Studies
Neural Tube Defects - prevention & control
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Primary Prevention
Abstract
The involvement of folic acid in the aetiology of neural tube defects (NTDs) has been discussed for decades. Both observational and controlled intervention trials have shown periconceptional folic acid supplementation (PFAS) to significantly reduce the incidence both of first-time and recurrent NTDs. PFAS may also be associated with reduction in the incidence of certain other congenital malformations, preterm delivery, and intra-uterine growth retardation. However, the mechanism whereby folic acid exerts its protective effect remains unclear. Thermolabile 5,10-methyl-enetetrahydrofolate reductase was the first folate-related enzyme to be associated with an increased risk of NTDs. This genetic variant may result in increased plasma homocysteine levels, which have been linked to an increased risk of NTDs. The folate-dependent genetic variants known today can explain no more than 30-50 per cent of the observed protective effect of folate. However, available evidence suggests low maternal folate status itself to be the major determinant of NTD risk. Since the vast majority of NTDs are first occurrences, and in Sweden a large proportion of fetuses with spina bifida remain undetected at routine ultrasonography during pregnancy, primary prevention by means of PFAS represents a major potential public health asset, capable of reducing both mortality and morbidity due to NTDs. Accordingly, implementation of a national strategy to reduce the incidence of NTDs, and promote awareness among health care providers and women of reproductive age of the benefits of PFAS is strongly to be recommended. Although supplemental folic acid tablets are the best proven means of improving folate status, compliance may be a problem, which emphasises the importance of considering a nutrient fortification programme as a complementary strategy for reducing the incidence of NTDs.
PubMed ID
10330863 View in PubMed
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Hip dislocations after 2,734 elective unilateral fast-track total hip arthroplasties: incidence, circumstances and predisposing factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258772
Source
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2014 Nov;134(11):1615-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Christoffer C Jørgensen
Per Kjaersgaard-Andersen
Søren Solgaard
Henrik Kehlet
Source
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2014 Nov;134(11):1615-22
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Elective Surgical Procedures
Female
Hip Dislocation - etiology - radiography
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Retrospective review of prospectively collected data.
To investigate the incidence of hip dislocation 90 days after total hip arthroplasty in relation to time after surgery, mechanism of dislocation and predisposing factors.
Prospective data on preoperative patient characteristics from six Danish arthroplasty departments with similar fast-track approaches were cross-referenced with the Danish National Patient Registry for complete 90-day follow-up on readmissions, including emergency-room contacts. Complete patient files and postoperative radiographs were reviewed in case of dislocations. Unadjusted comparisons were made using t test/Chi-square analyses, while evaluation of risk factors potentially predisposing to dislocations was done using uni- and multivariate regression analysis.
A total of 2,734 consecutive unselected procedures were available for analysis, of which 65 (2.4 %) had dislocations. Of these, eight were during index admission and five were treated and discharged from the emergency room. Mechanisms of dislocation were most often movement while supine or sitting for the first 30 days and due to squatting/bending from day 31 to 90. The 65 patients with dislocations had suboptimal cup placement in 34 (52.3 %), and a femoral head size of
PubMed ID
25118616 View in PubMed
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Holistic assessment of a secondary water supply for a new development in Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264053
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Nov 1;497-498:430-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2014
Author
M. Rygaard
B. Godskesen
C. Jørgensen
B. Hoffmann
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Nov 1;497-498:430-9
Date
Nov-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Denmark
Housing
Humans
Water Resources - standards - statistics & numerical data
Water Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Increasing stress on water resources is driving urban water utilities to establish new concepts for water supply. This paper presents the consequences of proposed alternative water supply options using a unique combination of quantitative and qualitative methods from different research fields. A former industrial harbor area in Copenhagen, Denmark, is currently under development and all infrastructure will be updated to accommodate 40,000 inhabitants and 40,000 jobs in the future. To reduce stress on water resources it has been proposed to establish a secondary water supply in the area as an alternative to the conventional groundwater-based drinking water supply. Four alternative concepts for a secondary water supply have been considered: 1) slightly polluted groundwater for use in toilets and laundry, 2) desalinated brackish water for use in toilets, laundry, and dishwashers, 3) desalinated brackish water for all uses, including drinking water, and 4) local reclamation of rain and gray water for use in toilets and laundry. The concepts have been evaluated for their technical feasibility, economy, health risks, and public acceptance, while the concepts' environmental sustainability has been assessed using lifecycle assessment and freshwater use impact methods. The holistic assessment method exposes conflicting preference solutions depending on assessment criteria, and reveals multi-faceted consequences for choices in urban water management. Not one concept turns out unambiguously positive based on the evaluation criteria included here, but the systematic evaluation will leave decision-makers informed on the consequences of their choices.
PubMed ID
25150737 View in PubMed
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Outcomes in smokers and alcohol users after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116210
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 May;57(5):631-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
C C Jørgensen
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Section for Surgical Pathophysiology 4074, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark. christoffer.calov.joergensen@regionh.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 May;57(5):631-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Smoking and alcohol use impair post-operative outcomes. However, no studies include fast-track surgery, which is a multimodal-enhanced recovery programme demonstrated to improve outcome. We hypothesised that outcome is similar in smokers and alcohol users as in non-users after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty.
Prospective questionnaires on co-morbidity and smoking/alcohol use were cross-referenced with the Danish National Health Registry to investigate relationship between smoking/alcohol use and length of stay of > 4 days and readmissions = 90 days after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty.
In 3041 consecutive patients, 458 reported smoking and 216 drinking > 2 drinks a day, of which 66 did both. Smokers/alcohol users were younger than non-users (mean age: 64.3 vs. 68.0 years, P 4 days and smoking (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], P) (1.34 [0.92-1.95], 0.127) or alcohol use (0.59 [0.30-1.16], 0.127). Thirty- and ninety-day readmission rate was 6.6% (n = 201) and 9.4% (n = 285). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed an increased risk of readmissions in smokers at 30 (1.60 [1.05-2.44], 0.028) but not 90-day follow-up (1.17 [0.80-1.73], 0.419). No increased risk of readmissions was found in alcohol users at 30 (0.94 [0.50-1.76], 0.838) or 90-day follow-up (0.83 [0.47-1.49], 0.532). No increased risk of specific readmissions (i.e. wound infections or pneumonia) typically related to smoking/alcohol use was found in smokers (1.56 [0.93-2.62], 0.091) or alcohol users (1.00 [0.47-2.15], 0.999) at 90-day follow-up.
Influence of smoking or alcohol use may be less pronounced in fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty compared with data with conventional care programmes.
PubMed ID
23421518 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.