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25- to 30-nm virus particle associated with a hospital outbreak of acute gastroenteritis with evidence for airborne transmission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233035
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Jun;127(6):1261-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
L A Sawyer
J J Murphy
J E Kaplan
P F Pinsky
D. Chacon
S. Walmsley
L B Schonberger
A. Phillips
K. Forward
C. Goldman
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Jun;127(6):1261-71
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Microbiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Disease Outbreaks
Emergency Service, Hospital
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norwalk virus - isolation & purification
Ontario
Virion - isolation & purification
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
Between November 1 and 22, 1985, an outbreak of acute, nonbacterial gastroenteritis occurred in a 600-bed hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Illness in 635 of 2,379 (27%) staff was characterized by fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting and had a median duration of 24-48 hours. The finding of virus-like particles measuring 25-30 nm in six stool specimens and low rates of seroresponse to Norwalk virus (3/39) and Snow Mountain agent (1/6) suggest that a Norwalk-like virus was responsible for the outbreak. The outbreak was of abrupt onset and high incidence, affecting 79 people in a single day. No common food or water exposure could be identified. The attack rate was greatest (69%) for staff who had worked in the Emergency Room. Of 100 patients and their companions who visited the Emergency Room on November 11-12 for unrelated problems, 33 (33%) developed gastroenteritis 24-48 hours after their visit, versus 0 of 18 who visited the Emergency Room on November 8 (p less than 0.001). An analysis of housekeepers who worked at least once during the period from November 9-13, which included those who became ill during the period of November 9-14, showed that the risk of becoming ill was four times greater for those who visited or walked through the Emergency Room than for those who did not (p = 0.028). These data are consistent with the possibility of the airborne spread of a virus.
PubMed ID
2835899 View in PubMed
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APIC/CHICA-Canada Infection Control and Epidemiology: Professional and Practice Standards. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc, and the Community and Hospital Infection Control Association-Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202287
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1999 Feb;27(1):47-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999

A cluster of surgical wound infections due to unrelated strains of group A streptococci.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221095
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1993 May;14(5):265-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
F B Jamieson
K. Green
D E Low
A E Simor
C. Goldman
J. Ng
A. McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1993 May;14(5):265-7
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cluster analysis
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Hospitals
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Restriction Mapping
Shock, Septic - diagnosis
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus pyogenes - isolation & purification
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Group A streptococci account for less than 1% of all surgical wound infections but are an important cause of nosocomial outbreaks. We report here a cluster of four group A streptococcal infections that occurred within an 11-day period on a single surgical service. The index case presented with toxic shock-like syndrome. Epidemiologic investigation did not identify any relationship between infections. Restriction endonuclease analysis and M and T typing found the four isolates to be unrelated. Restriction endonuclease analysis is a useful tool for determining relatedness of nosocomial isolates of group A streptococci.
PubMed ID
8496580 View in PubMed
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Improved access to women's health services for Alaska natives through community health aide training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72315
Source
J Community Health. 1999 Aug;24(4):313-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
C H Sox
A J Dietrich
D C Goldman
E M Provost
Author Affiliation
Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755, USA.
Source
J Community Health. 1999 Aug;24(4):313-23
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Breast Diseases - diagnosis - ethnology
Community Health Aides - education
Comparative Study
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Rural Population
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - diagnosis - ethnology
Vaginal Smears
Women's Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This project demonstrates the effect of increasing the skills of Community Health Aides (CHAs) on the use of specific preventive health services by women in remote Alaska villages. Eight CHAs were trained in specimen collection for Pap and sexually transmitted disease testing, and in clinical breast examination. Skill competency was monitored. Computerized medical records of all women between the ages of 18 and 75 in the four villages with trained CHAs and in four comparison villages (n = 1093) were checked for Pap status prior to CHA training and again 12 months later. All eight CHAs achieved competency and provided services in their village clinics with telephone support from an experienced clinician. The post-training year Pap test rate of women who were overdue for a Pap test was 0.44 in the villages with trained CHAs; the rate among the women in the comparison villages was 0.32 (p = .079).
PubMed ID
10463474 View in PubMed
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Use of molecular typing to study the epidemiology of Serratia marcescens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103326
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Jan;28(1):55-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
A. McGeer
D E Low
J. Penner
J. Ng
C. Goldman
A E Simor
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Jan;28(1):55-8
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
DNA, Bacterial - genetics - isolation & purification
Enterobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Serratia marcescens - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Although Serratia marcescens is a well-known nosocomial pathogen, investigation of its hospital ecology has been limited by the lack of available typing techniques. During an investigation of the occurrence of this organism in a neonatal intensive care unit, we evaluated a number of such techniques. Using a selective medium, we conducted prospective surveillance of neonatal rectal colonization and environmental contamination with S. marcescens. In 8 months of surveillance, 5.1% (20 of 394) of the infants admitted to the unit became colonized. Most sink surfaces and drains were also culture positive. Differences between isolates could not be detected in biotypes from a commercial identification system (MicroScan) or by antibiograms, total protein fingerprints, or plasmid profiles. Serogrouping and genomic DNA restriction endonuclease analysis revealed the presence of six strains that colonized infants and a similar number of environmental strains. These two methods were concordant, with the exception that genomic DNA analysis demonstrated lack of relatedness between some strains within the same serogroup. DNA restriction endonuclease analysis was practical and reliable. The differences this method detected between environmental and neonatal strains provided strong evidence that the environment was not an important reservoir for S. marcescens in our neonatal intensive care unit.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2405015 View in PubMed
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Utilization review of the use of BACTEC PLUS high-volume blood culture bottles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220195
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Oct;31(10):2794-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
R C Porter
P. Lo
D E Low
A E Simor
A. McGeer
S. Scriver
T C Moore
C. Goldman
M. Skulnick
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Oct;31(10):2794-5
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteremia - diagnosis
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Bacteriological Techniques
Humans
Ontario
Utilization Review
Abstract
The BACTEC PLUS 26 (NR26) (Becton Dickinson, Towson, Md.) high-volume blood culture bottle replaced the less expensive smaller-volume NR6A bottle in our hospital. An audit carried out several months after their introduction revealed that only 17.5% of the NR26 bottles received the required blood volume. Several audits and educational programs were required in order to achieve a compliance rate of > 60%.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8253987 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.