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Baseline patterns of adipose tissue fatty acids and long-term risk of breast cancer: a case-cohort study in the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264936
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct;68(10):1088-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
J A Schmidt
A. Gorst-Rasmussen
P W Nyström
J H Christensen
E B Schmidt
C. Dethlefsen
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
C C Dahm
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct;68(10):1088-94
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Subcutaneous Fat - chemistry
Abstract
The evidence regarding fatty acids and breast cancer risk is inconclusive. Adipose tissue fatty acids can be used as biomarkers of fatty acid intake and of endogenous fatty acid exposure. Fatty acids in adipose tissue are correlated owing to common dietary sources and shared metabolic pathways, which group fatty acids into naturally occurring patterns. We aimed to prospectively investigate associations between adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and long-term risk of total breast cancer and breast cancer subtypes characterised by oestrogen and progesterone receptor status (ER and PR).
This case-cohort study was based on data from the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health. At baseline, a fat biopsy and information on lifestyle and reproductive factors were collected. From the 31 original fatty acids measured, patterns of fatty acids were identified using the treelet transform. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 474 breast cancer cases were identified. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of risk of total breast cancer and of subtypes according to quintiles of factor score were determined by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression.
After adjustment for potential confounders, factor scores for the seven patterns identified by the treelet transform were not associated with risk of total breast cancer, nor with risk of ER+, ER-, PR+ or PR- tumours.
No clear associations between the patterns of fatty acids at baseline and long-term risk of total breast cancer or ER+, ER-, PR+ or PR- tumours were observed.
PubMed ID
24642780 View in PubMed
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Obesity and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144594
Source
Eur Respir J. 2010 Dec;36(6):1330-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
J B Kornum
M. Nørgaard
C. Dethlefsen
K M Due
R W Thomsen
A. Tjønneland
H T Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. j.kornum@rn.dk
Source
Eur Respir J. 2010 Dec;36(6):1330-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Obesity may be associated with increased risk of pneumonia, but available data on this relationship are sparse and inconsistent. We followed a prospective cohort of 22,578 males and 25,973 females from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study, aged 50-64 yrs and free from major chronic diseases at baseline (1993-1997), for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia (median follow-up 12 yrs). Compared with males of normal weight, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for pneumonia were 1.4 (95% CI 1.2-1.7) for males with moderate obesity (body mass index (BMI) 30.0-34.9 kg·m?²), and 2.0 (95% CI 1.4-2.8) for males with severe obesity (BMI = 35.0 kg·m?²), controlling for lifestyle and educational variables. Among females the associations were weaker, with adjusted HRs of 0.8 (95% CI 0.6-1.0) for moderate obesity, and 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.6) for severe obesity. Adjustment for major chronic diseases diagnosed during follow-up eliminated the associations between obesity and pneumonia risk. Obesity is associated with higher risk of hospitalisation with pneumonia among males but not among females, which is apparently explained by occurrence of other chronic diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2011 May;37(5):1298; author reply 1299-130021532024
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2011 May;37(5):1299; author reply 1299-130021532025
PubMed ID
20351023 View in PubMed
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Seasonal variation of venous thrombosis: a consecutive case series within studies from Leiden, Milan and Tromsø: a rebuttal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117636
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):568-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
A L Christensen
C. Dethlefsen
M T Severinsen
S R Kristensen
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):568-70
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Seasons
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):570-223311721
Comment On: J Thromb Haemost. 2012 Aug;10(8):1704-722681473
PubMed ID
23279121 View in PubMed
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