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Accuracy of administrative data for assessing outcomes after knee replacement surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209148
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Mar;50(3):265-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
G A Hawker
P C Coyte
J G Wright
J E Paul
C. Bombardier
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Mar;50(3):265-73
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Hospital records
Humans
Joint Diseases - complications - surgery
Knee Prosthesis - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pilot Projects
Postoperative Complications
Registries
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of information in an administrative database (Canadian Institute for Health Information; CIHI) compared with the hospital record for patients undergoing knee replacement (KR).
A stratified random sample of 185 KR recipients from 5 Ontario hospitals were chosen. Their hospital records and corresponding CIHI files were compared to assess percent complete agreement, false negative (FN) and false positive (FP) rates for demographic data, procedures, and diagnoses.
Of 185 records, 175 (95%) were reviewed. Percent complete agreement was greater than 94% for each of patient demographics and procedures (mean FN rates: 0%; mean FP rates: 0-5%). For comorbidities and complications, although mean percent complete agreement was high, and FP rates were low, mean FN rates were 63% for specific comorbid conditions and 70% for organ systems.
High FN rates have been found in documentation of comorbidities and in-hospital complications for CIHI data compared with the hospital record. Under-coding of comorbidities and in-hospital complications has potential implications for researchers using administrative databases.
PubMed ID
9120525 View in PubMed
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Comparative costs of the various strategies of urinary stone disease management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214465
Source
Urology. 1995 Sep;46(3 Suppl A):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
M A Jewett
C. Bombardier
C W Menchions
Author Affiliation
Division of Urology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Urology. 1995 Sep;46(3 Suppl A):15-22
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Capital Expenditures
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs
Humans
Lithotripsy - economics
Nephrostomy, Percutaneous - economics
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Calculi - economics - therapy
Abstract
New technology is a major determinant of total healthcare costs. The assessment of alternative technologies from a cost-effectiveness perspective is important, although other considerations may finally determine which technology is used. The alternatives of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PCNL) for the treatment of renal stone disease were compared by studying 1000 cases of ESWL and 133 cases of PCNL using a noncontemporaneous cohort study with PCNL representing the earlier cohort. The effectiveness, defined by success and stone-free rates, was higher with PCNL than with ESWL (96% success vs. 70%); PCNL was also accompanied by a lower burden of additional therapy, whereas ESWL had a higher retreatment rate. From the perspective of a third-party payer, total costs per case of ESWL ($2,746) were lower than those of PCNL ($4,087), but the figure varies with the annual volume. These represent the costs for complete treatment of a patient, including the costs of alternative technology such as PCNL or ureteroscopy that may ultimately be necessary in a patient initially managed by ESWL. The cost for a single ESWL treatment was $2,226 (at a volume of 1000 cases per year), but this increased to $2,746 when costs of retreatment and alternative treatment were prorated to each patient treated. The relative contribution of capital costs to the total cost of ESWL was always less than total professional fees and was only 12% at a volume of 2000 cases/year. Therefore ESWL is less expensive but it is also less effective in rendering patients stone-free.
PubMed ID
7653018 View in PubMed
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The cost-effectiveness of misoprostol for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-associated adverse gastrointestinal events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221372
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1993 Apr;36(4):447-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
S E Gabriel
R L Jaakkimainen
C. Bombardier
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905.
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1993 Apr;36(4):447-59
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Humans
Middle Aged
Misoprostol - economics - therapeutic use
Peptic Ulcer - chemically induced - prevention & control
Abstract
To compare, in a Canadian health care setting, the costs and consequences of 3 strategies of misoprostol prophylaxis for osteoarthritis patients: prophylaxis for all patients taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), for no patients taking NSAIDs, and for only elderly patients (age > or = 60) taking NSAIDs.
We designed a decision-analysis model which incorporated costs (estimated with ulcer patient profiles and medical records), review, and probabilities (estimated from a companion meta-analysis, selected literature review, and Ontario Ministry of Health Statistics). Effectiveness was defined as the number of episodes of gastric ulceration requiring hospitalization or outpatient management that were averted by each strategy.
On average, prophylaxis cost an additional $650 for every additional gastrointestinal event prevented. Prophylaxis for elderly NSAID users was cost saving if the ulcer complication rate in this group exceeds 1.2%, or if either the charges for outpatient ulcer treatment exceed $2,000, or the 3-month price of misoprostol is
PubMed ID
8457220 View in PubMed
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Crosscultural validation and reliability of 3 disease activity indices in systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224016
Source
J Rheumatol. 1992 Apr;19(4):608-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
D D Gladman
C H Goldsmith
M B Urowitz
P. Bacon
C. Bombardier
D. Isenberg
K. Kalunian
M H Liang
P. Maddison
O. Nived
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Rheumatology Disease Unit, Wellesley Hospital, ON, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1992 Apr;19(4):608-11
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Boston
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Great Britain
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - physiopathology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Rheumatologists from 4 countries, representing 8 rheumatology centers, tested 3 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity indices: the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) from Toronto; the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) from Boston and the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) for their reproducibility and validity in the assessment of real patients. Seven patients representing a spectrum of disease manifestations and activity were each examined by 4 of 7 observers from all centers except Toronto, using a Youden square design. Each observer completed all 3 indices and a category rating scale for disease activity on each of the 4 patients seen. All 3 indices detected differences among patients. There was no detectable observer effect among the 7 observers with each of the 3 indices. There was a detectable order effect with the SLAM. The 3 indices are comparable and reproducible for evaluating disease activity in SLE.
PubMed ID
1593583 View in PubMed
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Effects of occupational therapy home service on patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226191
Source
Lancet. 1991 Jun 15;337(8755):1453-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1991
Author
A. Helewa
C H Goldsmith
P. Lee
C. Bombardier
B. Hanes
H A Smythe
P. Tugwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Lancet. 1991 Jun 15;337(8755):1453-6
Date
Jun-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - rehabilitation
Follow-Up Studies
Home Care Services
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - methods - standards
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
Because there is little information about the efficacy of home occupational therapy, we decided to assess the effects of a home service on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 105 patients aged 18-70 years, on stable medical therapy, were randomised to receive a 6-week comprehensive programme of occupational therapy (experimental group, 53 patients) or to receive no such treatment (control group, 52). At 6 weeks, control patients received the experimental regimen, and experimental patients were continued on treatment as needed up to 12 weeks. Outcomes were measured at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks with a global functional capacity score (functional score). At 6 weeks the functional score for the experimental group was significantly higher than that for the control group (mean difference = 8.1, 95% Cl 1.7 to 15.8, p = 0.012). Control patients at 12 weeks showed a similar improvement to experimental patients at 6 weeks, and between 6 and 12 weeks the experimental patients were stable. Occupational therapy leads to a statistically significant and clinically important improvement in function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
PubMed ID
1675329 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of musculoskeletal disorders (complaints) and related disability in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238030
Source
J Rheumatol. 1985 Dec;12(6):1169-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985
Author
P. Lee
A. Helewa
H A Smythe
C. Bombardier
C H Goldsmith
Source
J Rheumatol. 1985 Dec;12(6):1169-73
Date
Dec-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Disability Evaluation
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
Data on musculoskeletal disorders (complaints), collected as part of the Canada Health Survey were analyzed. Sixteen percent of those sampled reported having arthritis, rheumatism or back, limb or joint disorders with a greater prevalence among females and in the older population. In 21% this was associated with limitation of activity with an average of 11 disability days/person/year. Serious back disorders were reported in 4.4% of the population. While the majority of health consultations (53%) were with a physician, a substantial number (34%) were with chiropractors.
PubMed ID
3879279 View in PubMed
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Evaluating changes in health status: reliability and responsiveness of five generic health status measures in workers with musculoskeletal disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210257
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Jan;50(1):79-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
D E Beaton
S. Hogg-Johnson
C. Bombardier
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Jan;50(1):79-93
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Metallurgy
Musculoskeletal Diseases - rehabilitation
Occupational Diseases - rehabilitation
Ontario
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
To compare the measurement properties over time of five generic health status assessment techniques.
Five health status measures were completed on two occasions by a sample of workers with musculoskeletal disorders. They included the SF-36, Nottingham Health Profile, Health Status Section of the Ontario Health Survey (OHS), Duke Health Profile, the Sickness Impact Profile and a self-report of change in health between tests.
Subjects were accrued from a work site (within one week of injury) (n = 53), physiotherapy clinics (four weeks after injury), (n = 34), and a tertiary level rehabilitation center (more than four weeks after injury) (n = 40).
Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) derived from nonparametric one-way analysis of variance were used for test-retest reliability in those who had not changed (n = 49). Various responsiveness statistics were used to evaluate responsiveness in those who claimed they had a positive change in health (n = 45) and in those who would have been expected to have a positive change (n = 79).
Of the 127 subjects recruited, 114 completed both questionnaires (89.8%). In the subjects who reported no change in health, analysis of targeted dimensions (overall scores, physical function, and pain) demonstrated acceptable to excellent test-retest reliability in all but the Duke Health Profile. In subjects with change in health, the SF-36 was the most responsive measure (moderate to large effect sizes [0.55-0.97] and standardized response means ranging between 0.81 and 1.13).
The results suggest that the SF-36 was the most appropriate questionnaire to measure health changes in the population studied. The selection of a health status measure must be context-specific, taking into account the purpose and population of the planned research.
PubMed ID
9048693 View in PubMed
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Hospitalizations for back and neck problems: a comparison between the Province of Ontario and Washington State.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204269
Source
Health Serv Res. 1998 Oct;33(4 Pt 1):929-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
V M Taylor
G M Anderson
B. McNeney
P. Diehr
J N Lavis
R A Deyo
C. Bombardier
A. Malter
T. Axcell
Author Affiliation
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98104, USA.
Source
Health Serv Res. 1998 Oct;33(4 Pt 1):929-45
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Back Pain - therapy
Cost Control
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - therapy
Ontario
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Small-Area Analysis
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Washington
Abstract
To examine back and neck hospitalizations in the Province of Ontario and Washington State. Because of their different organization and financing, there has been considerable interest in comparing healthcare systems in Canada and the United States. Features of healthcare systems might be expected to result in greater variations in care for elective than urgent conditions.
Automated hospital discharge databases.
Previously developed algorithms were used to identify surgical and nonsurgical hospitalizations for back and neck problems in the administrative databases. We compared overall rates of hospitalization and lengths of hospital stay in Ontario and Washington as well as small area variations within the province and state.
Surgical back and neck hospitalizations were three times as common in Washington, but medical hospitalizations were twice as common in Ontario. Provincial lengths of stay were longer for both surgical and nonsurgical hospitalizations. Admission rates varied substantially and significantly among small areas in both Washington and Ontario. Variations in hospital length of stay were greater in Ontario, particularly for nonsurgical back and neck hospitalizations.
The two jurisdictions had very different patterns of hospital utilization for one of the most common health problems seen by physicians. Our results suggest that the global controls on hospital budgets and access to technology in Ontario were associated with lower rates of surgery, higher rates of hospital-based medical care, and longer lengths of stay. They also indicate that the utilization review process in Washington was associated with lower small area variation rates for medical back care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9776943 View in PubMed
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How Canadian and US rheumatologists treat moderate or aggressive rheumatoid arthritis: a survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203599
Source
J Rheumatol. 1998 Dec;25(12):2331-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
A. Maetzel
C. Bombardier
V. Strand
P. Tugwell
G. Wells
Author Affiliation
Healthcare Research Division, Arthritis & Immune Disorder Research Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. maetzel@whri.on.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 1998 Dec;25(12):2331-8
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Canada
Data Collection
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns
Rheumatology
Sulfasalazine - therapeutic use
United States
Abstract
To determine which second line agents Canadian and US rheumatologists use to treat patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
A one page survey was sent by fax or mail to all 263 members of the Canadian Rheumatology Association and 320 members of the American College of Rheumatology (10% random sample weighted by region) known to practice adult rheumatology. The survey asked for first and second treatment preferences in patients with (1) aggressive RA; (2) moderate RA; and (3) aggressive RA failing a trial of methotrexate (MTX) 25 mg.
Altogether 231 (87.8%) Canadian and 230 (71.7%) US rheumatologists responded, and 214 responses in each survey were analyzable. In aggressive RA. MTX was the drug of first choice of most Canadian (68.7%) and US (78.5%) rheumatologists. Intramuscular gold was a drug of first choice for 14.5 and 1.9% of Canadians and Americans, respectively. 93.9% of Canadian and 90.2% of US respondents preferred single agents for the treatment of moderate RA. Among US rheumatologists. no clear leader emerged as a single agent alternative for the management of aggressive RA unresponsive to MTX. Most said they would use combination (38.3%) or triple (23.8%) therapy involving MTX plus sulfasalazine and/or hydroxychloroquine. 52.3% of Canadians preferred single agent therapy, with 34.6% choosing gold as an alternative to MTX.
Canadian and US rheumatologists preferred MTX for the treatment of aggressive RA. Canadian rheumatologists saw a small but significant role for intramuscular gold. No single agent emerged as a clear alternative to MTX among US rheumatologists.
PubMed ID
9858426 View in PubMed
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How should importance and severity ratings be combined for item reduction in the development of health status instruments?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202378
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Mar;52(3):193-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
R G Marx
C. Bombardier
S. Hogg-Johnson
J G Wright
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery and Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Mar;52(3):193-7
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Arm
Arthritis
Female
Health status
Hip
Humans
Joint Diseases
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pain Measurement
Patients
Questionnaires - standards
Radius Fractures
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Patients' ratings of the severity and importance of items are often used to select items for health status instruments. The purpose of this study was to compare six different methods of combining severity-importance ratings. Two different patient groups separately rated the importance and severity of their complaints; (i) 76 patients with upper-extremity disorders rated 70 upper-extremity-related questions; and (ii) 86 patients with hip arthrosis rated 22 questions relating to their hip problem. The rank ordering of the items using the six different methods in the two populations were very similar (tau(bi) = 0.91 and 0.87, respectively). Furthermore, the six methods when used to choose 30 upper-extremity items shared 25 items in common and shared 9 (of 10) hip items in the second group. In conclusion, the results of item reduction were not affected by the method of creating importance-severity ratings.
PubMed ID
10210236 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.