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Excess mortality in giant cell arteritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225971
Source
J Intern Med. 1991 Aug;230(2):119-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
C. Bisgård
H. Sloth
N. Keiding
K. Juel
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital of Holstebro, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1991 Aug;230(2):119-23
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biopsy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Giant Cell Arteritis - mortality - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymyalgia Rheumatica - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Temporal Arteries - pathology
Abstract
A 13-year departmental sample of 34 patients with definite (biopsy-verified) giant cell arteritis (GCA) was reviewed. The mortality of this material was compared to sex-, age- and time-specific death rates in the Danish population. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.8 (95% confidence limits, 1.1-2.8). During the same period 146 patients with probable (not biopsied, but clinically diagnosed in the department) GCA and 85 cases of possible (diagnosed and treated before admission) GCA had been admitted to the department. Those two groups did not differ from the biopsy-verified group with respect to SMR, sex distribution or age. In the group of patients with department-diagnosed GCA (definite + probable = 180 patients), the 95% confidence interval for the SMR of the women included 1.0. In all other subgroups there was a significant excess mortality. Excess mortality has been found in two of seven previous studies on survival in GCA. The prevailing opinion that steroid-treated GCA does not affect the life expectancy of patients is probably not correct.
PubMed ID
1865162 View in PubMed
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[Seasonal variation in disseminated sclerosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229252
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Apr 16;152(16):1160-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-1990
Author
C. Bisgård
Author Affiliation
Centralsygehuset i Holstebro, Neurologisk Afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Apr 16;152(16):1160-1
Date
Apr-16-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Abstract
Forty-five patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (DS) with onset in the period studied, were reviewed retrospectively. The time of the first exacerbation after the onset, but not the time of onset exhibited seasonal variation (p = 0.003), as 76% of the exacerbations occurred in the winter months. On review of all 148 cases of clinically definite DS in the department's records, a seasonal variation was found of both the time of onset (p = 0.047) and the time of the next exacerbation (p = 0.0004). In previous studies different seasons of peak disease activity were found. These differences may be caused by different methods or by differences in the local factors, which influence the course of the disease. The seasonal variation of the frequency of the disease manifestations is probably caused by a variation in environmental factors. In this study, the importance of infections could not be evaluated.
PubMed ID
2330640 View in PubMed
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