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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and risk of myocardial infarction in middle-aged Danes: the diet, cancer and health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290731
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 05; 71(5):652-658
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
V B Gunge
I Andersen
C Kyrø
C P Hansen
C C Dahm
J Christensen
A Tjønneland
A Olsen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 05; 71(5):652-658
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet, Mediterranean
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Healthy Diet
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
For decades, the Mediterranean diet has been in focus regarding healthy eating as it has been associated with reduced risk of non-communicable diseases. Less interest has been given to health benefits of other regional diets. The aim of the present study was to assess whether adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was associated with lower risk of myocardial infarction (MI) among middle-aged Danes.
Data were obtained from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study of 57?053 men and women aged 50-64 years recruited between 1993 and 1997. The healthy Nordic food index comprised healthy Nordic food items selected a priori (fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apple and pears and root vegetables). Information on incident MI was ascertained through linkage with national registries. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from sex-specific Cox proportional hazard models.
In total, 1669 men and 653 women developed MI during follow-up (13.6 median years). In adjusted models, those with an index score of 5-6 points (highest scores) had significantly lower MI risk (men: HR=0.77, 95% CI=0.62, 0.97; women: HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.37, 0.82) relative to those scoring 0 points in the index (lowest score). A significantly lower MI risk was found per 1-point increment in the index in both men (HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.92, 0.99) and women (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.88, 0.98).
A healthy Nordic diet is associated with lower MI risk among middle-aged Danes, suggesting that Nordic diets should be considered in recommendations for dietary changes in the promotion of coronary health.
PubMed ID
28247857 View in PubMed
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Baseline patterns of adipose tissue fatty acids and long-term risk of breast cancer: a case-cohort study in the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264936
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct;68(10):1088-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
J A Schmidt
A. Gorst-Rasmussen
P W Nyström
J H Christensen
E B Schmidt
C. Dethlefsen
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
C C Dahm
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct;68(10):1088-94
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Subcutaneous Fat - chemistry
Abstract
The evidence regarding fatty acids and breast cancer risk is inconclusive. Adipose tissue fatty acids can be used as biomarkers of fatty acid intake and of endogenous fatty acid exposure. Fatty acids in adipose tissue are correlated owing to common dietary sources and shared metabolic pathways, which group fatty acids into naturally occurring patterns. We aimed to prospectively investigate associations between adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and long-term risk of total breast cancer and breast cancer subtypes characterised by oestrogen and progesterone receptor status (ER and PR).
This case-cohort study was based on data from the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health. At baseline, a fat biopsy and information on lifestyle and reproductive factors were collected. From the 31 original fatty acids measured, patterns of fatty acids were identified using the treelet transform. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 474 breast cancer cases were identified. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of risk of total breast cancer and of subtypes according to quintiles of factor score were determined by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression.
After adjustment for potential confounders, factor scores for the seven patterns identified by the treelet transform were not associated with risk of total breast cancer, nor with risk of ER+, ER-, PR+ or PR- tumours.
No clear associations between the patterns of fatty acids at baseline and long-term risk of total breast cancer or ER+, ER-, PR+ or PR- tumours were observed.
PubMed ID
24642780 View in PubMed
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